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  • Different Hapologroups

    This question seems almost too obvious to answer, but as a newbie I need some answers, so thanks in advance.

    Can variants of a surname be geneologically connected if they originate from different haplotyes / groups (not sure of the difference there).

    The scenario is as follows: The interest haplogroup is I1. There are twelve different variants of the surname spelling ultimately derived from what I've found to be just two focus groups and thus far those others are turing up R1B1 or at least I in one case. Now I realize that people marry and things change, but in this case we're trying to pin down a direction on introduction to the originating country. I1 figures into the geneology quite well as it follows on recorded origins of the patronymic.

    R1d1 however, originates froma complelteyl differnt intro duction and time period for the other main variant: of which there after two that are known. One is Gaelic (Celt) R1b1 and the other is Nomran / Dane I1.

    Rather than confuse it any further, I think that those more experienced may well know what I'm trying to ask.

    Thoughts?

    ps: I know that spelling really means nothing in genealogy, but DNA does!
    Last edited by A1A; 22 January 2014, 09:04 PM.

  • #2
    There's a simple answer to your question. No.

    If two people with the same surname or a variant have different haplogroups (for instance, one I and the other R1b), then they are not related in a genealogical time frame. They haven't had a common paternal line ancestor in at least several thousand years. If the paper trail indicates they have a common ancestor in the last few hundred years, then there's probably been an NPE, such as an adoption or illegitimacy.

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    • #3
      I can't thank you enough for that reply. It really helps me with the most difficult brick wall I've delt with as yet. The plan now is to start a project and invite all the differnt variants to submit samples and see what we get.

      Whom can I talk to about that? I'm sort of a computer dummie with things like that.

      Thanks so much once again!

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      • #4
        Hi. You need to check very carefully that a project for the surname and variants does not already exist. If not and you are willing to do the administration there is an application form for a new project to be set up at the following link...

        http://www.familytreedna.com/project-application.aspx

        Good luck.

        Earl.

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=A1A;376669]This question seems almost too obvious to answer, but as a newbie I need some answers, so thanks in advance.

          Can variants of a surname be geneologically connected if they originate from different haplotyes / groups (not sure of the difference there)./QUOTE]

          Haplotype is the results from you STR tests (Y-DNA12, 25, 37, 67 or 111).

          Haplogroup can be predicted from your Haplotype and can be verified by SNP tests.

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          • #6
            "If two people with the same surname or a variant have different haplogroups (for instance, one I and the other R1b), then they are not related in a genealogical time frame"

            I understand the answer was in the context of surname search, just to make sure I am not confused as well:

            It means they arent related via the corresponding DIRECT paternal lines but they could still be cousins, even close cousins.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by goldschlager View Post
              "If two people with the same surname or a variant have different haplogroups (for instance, one I and the other R1b), then they are not related in a genealogical time frame"

              I understand the answer was in the context of surname search, just to make sure I am not confused as well:

              It means they arent related via the corresponding DIRECT paternal lines but they could still be cousins, even close cousins.
              Correct. They could be cousins, but not in the direct paternal lines. In fact, that could be an explanation of why they have the same surname. Perhaps they were adopted by an uncle with the surname they don't match in haplogroup.

              For instance, John Smith is the birth father. He and his wife die and his sons are orphans. They're taken in by a brother of John's wife, named George Jones. The adopted children are given that name. So, the descendants are genetically Smiths, but have the Jones surname. But they are cousins of the Jones line that raised them.

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