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  • Reluctant family members

    I have some family members who are reluctant to give their DNA because they have an unfounded fear that it will somehow get in the hands of an insurance company or the government. Obviously this is not true but they are worried about it anyway. I would like to know if anyone else has encountered this and found a way to successfully deal with it. Thank you.

  • #2
    Originally posted by glenn223 View Post
    I have some family members who are reluctant to give their DNA because they have an unfounded fear that it will somehow get in the hands of an insurance company or the government. Obviously this is not true but they are worried about it anyway. I would like to know if anyone else has encountered this and found a way to successfully deal with it. Thank you.
    You could get written permission from them to obtain a DNA sample after
    they are deceased. (if you are willing to wait)

    The insurance company or the government can't really do anything to them at that point.

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    • #3
      Hi glenn223,

      You are already in trouble, big trouble. The insurance companies and the government already now have your DNA, and so your immediate family and other relatives are now already compromised, too. Oh, no!

      Hehehe! Relax, that is no big deal, no problem.

      Well, that could be a problem if you could be wanted for some sort of a crime, but you do not seem to be that sort of a person.

      So, simply assure your family and your relatives that DNA testing is not a big deal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by glenn223 View Post
        I have some family members who are reluctant to give their DNA because they have an unfounded fear that it will somehow get in the hands of an insurance company or the government. Obviously this is not true but they are worried about it anyway. I would like to know if anyone else has encountered this and found a way to successfully deal with it. Thank you.
        Glenn223, given the totalliarian state that many thoughtful Americans believe that we now live in, it is a valid concern. I choose to do it because I am now older, 70. Had I been 50 I likely would not have done so. After all, it wasn't until 1963 that involuntary forced sterilization was ended in the United States. The idea was to improve the American stock by sterilizing the bottom 10% each year. That was a mere 50 years ago. A quiet genocide of American Indians continues to this day. So those worries being expressed are not so far fetched. Respect peoples wishes.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by glenn223 View Post
          I have some family members who are reluctant to give their DNA because they have an unfounded fear that it will somehow get in the hands of an insurance company or the government. Obviously this is not true but they are worried about it anyway. I would like to know if anyone else has encountered this and found a way to successfully deal with it. Thank you.
          Why not let them use your contact information and the name of an ancestor.

          There is no legal chain of possession of the DNA sample. How can the government or insurance company use the information?

          Comment


          • #6
            reluctant family members

            This is easy. Just make up a name for them or use fake initials and numbers as their name, whatever. Just create an alias. Send the kit to your address and list you as the kit owner and return address.
            Then if you attach a tree to their account, just put private next to all until maybe the great grandparents line. Or else, don't include a tree and take requests one by one. There is no way for the government or anyone else to know who you got the kit from unless they are a wanted criminal and have their dna on file as a criminal suspect for a murder or rape or something.
            I have already done the same thing with my family. I even created Hotmail email accounts to go with the alias. Easy enough.

            Comment


            • #7
              For those with Privacy Concerns

              Hello,

              I wrote this for an something else recently, but all who work to get people to test may find it useful.

              Family Tree DNA has several levels of privacy. First, you need only share as much of your contact information with your matches as you wish. This is usually your full name and e-mail address. You may if you wish use only your first initials or even test under an aylias. You may use a free e-mail service (for example Gmail) to create a DNA testing specific contact address.

              From there, testing is separate from our matching consent form. You can if you wish test with us but not sign the matching consent. Your genetic matching information would then not be shared. If you do sign the consent, your matching follows what is in our privacy policy (http://www.familytreedna.com/privacy-policy.aspx).

              Matching time-frames depend on the test you take. Y-DNA (paternal lineage) matching is usually recent back to the 1600s. You will have the option to match only other men who share your surname or to match all men who have consented into the database. There is implied sharing your exact Y-DNA values for your exact matches. I.e., if you match them exactly, they can assume you have the exact same values as you. The true raw Y-DNA lab results are not shared though.

              Maternal lineage (mtDNA) matching can reach back about 9,000 years. Again, a consented exact match can assume that your processed genetic markers are exactly the same as theirs. As you will find in the privacy policy, we allow some differences. While we show contact (name & e-mail) information for matches with 1, 2, or 3 differences, we do not disclose to either person the other's results.

              Universal autosomal DNA matching is almost always within recent generations. Most matches will be within 5 generation. In some cases matching may reach back to around 12 generations. We do not share raw autosomal data with matches. We do provide a Chromosome Browser tool that shows you on each autosomal chromosome where you and a match have matching DNA.

              Customers always have the right to revoke their matching consent and/or to have their DNA results and DNA sample destroyed. They are not common requests, but we act on them promptly


              I, myself, deal with extended Italian-American family that is neither criminal nor paranoid, but culturally takes privacy personally.

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              • #8
                reluctant family members

                Thanks everyone for the feedback. I like the idea of false names. That might help convince these people.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
                  There is no legal chain of possession of the DNA sample. How can the government or insurance company use the information?
                  Court Order can force any company to give up just about anything. It is easy to find a good reason to obtain a DNA sample.

                  That said, the US has a law saying Insurance Companies cannot use DNA as a factor in their decisions, so they would not be able to get it. The police could easily find a good reason to sway a judge to issue the order.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If the police wanted your dna they would just swab your mouth almost all police stations do dna test at your cost when you go to jail.

                    How would they even know where you tested they wouldn't.

                    Originally posted by cybrsage View Post
                    Court Order can force any company to give up just about anything. It is easy to find a good reason to obtain a DNA sample.

                    That said, the US has a law saying Insurance Companies cannot use DNA as a factor in their decisions, so they would not be able to get it. The police could easily find a good reason to sway a judge to issue the order.
                    Last edited by madman; 9 February 2014, 12:40 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cybrsage View Post
                      Court Order can force any company to give up just about anything.
                      Without a legal chain of possession of the DNA sample it is worthless in any court.

                      Originally posted by cybrsage View Post
                      It is easy to find a good reason to obtain a DNA sample.
                      True! And that is when they get a court order to come get your DNA sample from you. When they come get it there is a legal chain of possession. Why would anyone get a court order to get a DNA sample from a lab when there is no way to prove it is your DNA? Why would any judge issue such a court order?

                      The DNA samples we send to FTDNA have NO VALUE to anyone but us. If you haven't done anything against the law why would you care if they did get you DNA from anywhere?

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