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Haplogroup J2

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  • Haplogroup J2

    Hello,
    I am a J2 HVR1 16069T 16193T 16278T 16362C. I still have to print out my HVR2 results. Is there anyone out there a J2 who can help me understand all this?
    My mother was from the Border area of Scotland and England.
    Thanks,
    Linda D.

  • #2
    Hi Linda,
    My paternal YDNA haplogroup is J2.
    So, I'm the opposite.
    I really struggled to understand my J2 as well.
    My paternal line, as far as I can trace, seem to have come from the UK.
    So, the J2 was a surprise.
    I received MUCH help from this mailing list:
    [email protected]
    I subscribe to this list & can submit any kind of question about my results, & within a few minutes, somebody will answer.
    They will help you figure out your mtDNA or paternal YDNA.
    You can also read from FTDNA's online library. It's on the main page.
    And you can email FTDNA directly, & they will try to help you as well.
    Good luck!
    Cinda

    Comment


    • #3
      Mtdna J2 is not uncommon in British Isles. It may reflect Celtic origin with high rates in Ireland.

      Comment


      • #4
        Note that Ftdna and National Geographic provide different pathways for Mtdna J. (Ftdna --Southen Europe heading west; National Geographic--Eastern Europe heading north) My impression is that the Southern Europe route applies more to J2 relatively speaking, i.e. a higher % of J2 on the southern route.
        Last edited by josh w.; 1 December 2005, 02:52 PM.

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        • #5
          Haplogroup MtJ2

          Hello list,
          I thought I knew something about genealogy but now that I've discovered genetic genealogy I find I'm a a babe in the woods.
          On a British Isles 2nd list I found someone with the Kit#N35522 and the earliest ancestor Sarah Bennett. If s/he is a J2 then we are a match. I can't find a British Isles project 2 forum, so I hoping s/he also reads this forum.
          Geraldine

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Geraldine
            Hello list,
            I thought I knew something about genealogy but now that I've discovered genetic genealogy I find I'm a a babe in the woods.
            On a British Isles 2nd list I found someone with the Kit#N35522 and the earliest ancestor Sarah Bennett. If s/he is a J2 then we are a match. I can't find a British Isles project 2 forum, so I hoping s/he also reads this forum.
            Geraldine
            Geraldine,
            Your matches should show up on your personal page, with an email address. Are you a member of the Bristish Isle 2 Project?

            Make sure you have your settings on your "User Preference" page for matching against the Entire Database
            Though the other person may have his/her settings to show matches within the groups they have joined only, not the entire database.

            Also check out mitosearch, you can join from you personal page.

            Comment


            • #7
              Haplogroup J2

              Thank you Rivergirl, for that suggestion. I'll check what preferences I requested. As for BI -2 there doesn't seem to be a project as there is for J2.

              Comment


              • #8
                Haplogroup J2

                Whoops, let me rephrase that. There is a British Isles 2 project - I joined it as it's for the Mt Js. What I can't find is a list of members or a forum.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by LindaD
                  Hello,
                  I am a J2 HVR1 16069T 16193T 16278T 16362C. I still have to print out my HVR2 results. Is there anyone out there a J2 who can help me understand all this?
                  My mother was from the Border area of Scotland and England.
                  Thanks,
                  Linda D.
                  Geraldine,
                  I also am J2 and have those same markers in common with you..my HVR2 results are:
                  73G 150T 152C 263G 295T 315.1C 489C

                  My oldest known ancestor is Margaret Lynch who came from Cork Ireland.I match 4 people exactly.They are from the Border of England and Scotland also.Northumberland.I think my Margaret who was my grandmother's grandmother(GG) had a Mother who was Scottish maybe? Two of my matches also describe an irish Grandmother..
                  There is a J2 group that you can join here at FTDNA..
                  Kathleen
                  Last edited by Kathleen Carrow; 29 July 2007, 09:01 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Haplogroup J2

                    Kathleen,
                    That is a very funny coincidence. My earliest known female ancestor is also a Margaret Lynch who was bc 1825 in Newry Co Down. This Margaret Lynch's father was Patrick (who was deceased before 1841) and her mother Mary (I don't know her maiden name). She arrived in Australia in 1841.
                    It will be interesting to see if any of my HVR2 results match yours when I get them. They are scheduled for early September.
                    Have you had contact with any of your matches?
                    Geraldine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Too many Margaret Lynch's.
                      Ive also got a Margaret Lynch in my family, born 1868 in Clunes,Victoria. Married Michael in Eltham, Victoria. Her father was John Lynch, mother Margaret. Any connection??

                      Anyway, I know there is a forum on the British Isles Project, but Im not sure if its just for BI-1 or both.
                      There should be a notepad icon on your personal page,next to an icon for Mitosearch. Under the drop down box for the projects.
                      It only has about 5 messages so far though.

                      If you are both in the British Isles 2 Project and have a match, then the other person should be on your matches list. But it will only show up as the person who tested, and their email.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Geraldine
                        Kathleen,
                        That is a very funny coincidence. My earliest known female ancestor is also a Margaret Lynch who was bc 1825 in Newry Co Down. This Margaret Lynch's father was Patrick (who was deceased before 1841) and her mother Mary (I don't know her maiden name). She arrived in Australia in 1841.
                        It will be interesting to see if any of my HVR2 results match yours when I get them. They are scheduled for early September.
                        Have you had contact with any of your matches?
                        Geraldine
                        Geraldine
                        It would be cool if we were connected..did you join the J2 mtDNA list also? I did not see you there..
                        One of my matches is to a Jane Cook whose father and Mother came on the Mayflower.The Mother was a Walloon.I don't think I got an e-mail from them yet but I found this on google just now: " On April 25, 1603, "Francois Cooke" appeared as witness to the betrothal of Raphael Roelandt, a woolcomber who would be a witness at his own betrothal a few months later. In his own betrothal on June 30, 1603, "Franchoijs Couck" is identified as a bachelor from England, with the occupation "woolcomber" and Hester Mahieu is described as an unmarried young woman from Canterbury in England. [Although Hester Mahieu is listed as "of Canterbury," she was a actually French-speaking Belgian, and not English. The Huguenots and Walloons were Protestant exiles from Europe. Those from France (known as the Huguenots) and those from present-day Belgium (known as Walloons), were persecuted for their religion and left in large numbers, with a good number coming to England. "

                        And one whose ancestry sounds a lot like mine has maternal line coming from Ingram Northumberland, close to Scotland. Funny thing there is that my married name is Ingram..hubby's parents are both Scots who came to US as adults and met here.Aberdeen which is close to Ingram Northumberland.

                        Margaret Lynch my Great Great Grandmother comes from Cork Ireland.She is born in 1841. She marries my GGGF by 1861 when she has my Great GM in Newport RI.He is Charles Rementer from Philadelphia.
                        Lots of misinformation about who is from where.Originally I was told that Charles was Canadian but he was not.His family are in Phila. in Revolutionary times.
                        So it remains a possibility, even a strong possibility that Margaret's family could have immigrated into Canada and then to NH & RI where she is found in July 1860. The reason I say strong possibility is that ships to US carrying someone of her name and age put her in New England perilously close to when she marries Charles..long enough to have a child of course but not long enough to have had any courtship to speak of. She was strongly religious.

                        I have not discarded the Canadian tale completely.

                        Margaret came here close to adulthood probably as she had a strong brogue.

                        I would love to track her and have had an Irish researcher do other stuff but Margaret Lynch Cork 1841 is a lot of people...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I just joined the British Isles 2 group also.MY MtDNA markers are not there yet though..
                          Here is the link for J2 http://www.familytreedna.com/public/mtJ2/

                          All J2's please join..most of us are Scottish or Irish and as I have learned lately it is mostly the same thing..
                          Except for the Walloon ..hmmmm..but I think it is a haplotype that is only centered near the Ocean and along the Mediterranean and Atlantic fringe.
                          For that reason I have read Oppenheimer's book and he states that my j2 and my grandfather 's I1b1b(Sardinian type) followed the same pathways in pre-history.Beachcombers.
                          Oppenheimer referred often to the book "Facing the Ocean" by Barry Cunliffe..which is about this same group of peoples.I have that one also.

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                          • #14
                            I misspoke(misswrote?) the person I match exactly is Linda D the first person to start this thread..seems I have an unusual marker 362C and have 4 high res. matches..all from Brtiish Isles except Jane Cook..

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=Kathleen Carrow]

                              And one whose ancestry sounds a lot like mine has maternal line coming from Ingram Northumberland, close to Scotland. Funny thing there is that my married name is Ingram..hubby's parents are both Scots who came to US as adults and met here.Aberdeen which is close to Ingram Northumberland[QUOTE]

                              Kathleen, speaking as a resident Brit (east-coast Scot), I must take issue with you when you say Aberdeen is close to Ingram in Northumberland. At a guesstimate, I would say they're about 150 miles apart. OK, I grant you, that's chickenfeed in North America where you can travel for a couple of hundred miles and still be in the same state (USA) or province (Canada). But a tiny distance in these islands can take you a long way, ethnically and culturally speaking. Just look at the place-names on the map and you can see where Pictish, Gaelic, Welsh, Norse, Anglo-Saxon and even Norman French names indicate different ethnic groups of settlers, often only a few miles from each other. We FEEL different from each other (even Scot from Scot, never mind the English!), and DNA testing programmes like Bryan Sykes's "Blood of the Isles" project have borne out what people have always suspected, that in different parts of the UK, even in little Scotland, people a few miles apart can have different ethnic profiles.

                              Travelling south from Aberdeen, which is in the heart of old Pictland, you cross the Firth of Tay into Fife and soon come to the Firth of Forth, beyond which lies Edinburgh, and the Lothians and Borders, which were originally Welsh then Anglo-Saxon - part of the kingdom of Northumbria. The Romans called the Forth "Mare Caledonicum", the Caledonian Sea, because the people of Fife and beyond were "Caledonians" or Picts, different from the Lothians people.

                              Cross the border into England and you're in Northumberland, where the Vikings were once strong. My wife's mtDNA ancestors were from this county, and her haplogroup is U4 (Ulrike), which suggests Viking forebears. Incidentally, I had Northumberland ancestors myself called Stephenson, who came from Alwinton, just a few miles SW of Ingram.

                              Harry

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