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been researching for years yet no legit answers..?

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  • been researching for years yet no legit answers..?

    Hello I started research about 2 years ago just doing family tree genealogy on ancestry.com finding close ancestors within the past few hundred years.

    Mid 2012 I ordered a autosomal dna test from DNAtribes.com and got the results my family has always told me that my heritage was..

    I wanted to know more though so later I ended up taking a test from ancestry.com and getting 80% autosomal dna results for Scandinavian.

    I ordered a paternal test kit from ftdna 12 markers and the results came back Welsh/Wales country of origin. with a genetic distance of 1

    I ordered a upgrade from 12 to 25 and the country of origin was Germany with a genetic distance of 2.

    Somewhere along the line Ancestry.com updated there results database and all of a sudden my results went from 80% scandinavian to 80% great britain and I dont have a clue why or what happened...

    What I am wanting to know is what my DNA says that i most relatively am closely similar to as far as ethnicity towards a country, because i know that when you mix father and mother you get dna from all the grandparents involved and you could be anything.

    From what I have said about my paternal testing with the 12 and 25 markers does anyone know anything about if i am more german or more welsh?

    The ancestry.com results answer would be a bonus answer as well that I would greatly appreciate as when I call the companies noone knows what to say and they just say that we tested more chromosomes and we plan to update in the future.

    To my point I don't trust ancestry.com because they can change their results every 6 months and say that they are analyzing my dna more thoroughly, although i think its a load of crap and am waiting to hear that my ancestors were from Antartica! LOL

  • #2
    You may need to pursue testing of your Y-DNA in great detail, not in STRs but in SNPs, especially if it is a common type like R1b.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi,

      Scandinavians are of Germanic origin, of Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, etc. The English language is Germanic at its core, although that language then became modified by Latin languages, too, of French, Italian, etc. And so if your genetics go to Germanic origins, then you could expect a widespread distribution of your genetics to central, northern and northwestern Europe.

      You should consider testing at 37 markers. 12 markers proves that you are human and 25 markers does have its uses, but 37 markers puts you into the game, and that is the point where the resident genetic "experts" will begin to take you seriously.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Tyler89 View Post
        Somewhere along the line Ancestry.com updated there results database and all of a sudden my results went from 80% scandinavian to 80% great britain and I dont have a clue why or what happened...
        This question has been covered quite extensively elsewhere.


        Originally posted by Tyler89 View Post
        What I am wanting to know is what my DNA says that i most relatively am closely similar to as far as ethnicity towards a country, because i know that when you mix father and mother you get dna from all the grandparents involved and you could be anything.
        This is where you are running into one problem - trying to force a molecule (DNA) into our notions of the modern nation-state.

        There is no "German" DNA, nor is there any "Welsh" DNA.

        We all have ancestors that came from many places. Some of us may be more admixed than others, but that is only a relative scale.

        There is no single answer - your "ethnicity" is dependent upon the time frame about which you are inquiring.

        "Britain" is a social/legal construct. The current residents of the British Isles are made of up ancestors who came from all over the place, mostly from northwest Europe, though the post-colonial period has brought in immigrants from all over the world.

        As for your Y chromosome - there are projects here dedicated to Welsh DNA, to Viking/Germanic Y, etc. If you contact the project managers they could give you some help in figuring out through which ancestral groups your Y may have travelled.

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        • #5
          Well actually the British are not considered to be celtic nation considering the fact that Britain was mainly the Anglo-saxons migrating and the Old English we refer to is actually A germanic dialect the anglo-saxons used back in around the 5th century.

          During my lapse of time from writing the original post I was able to discover my paper trail of my paternal lineage dating back to 1550 Southeastern Germany on my dads side.
          my second great grandma on my dads side takes me to Scotland specifically the Mclaine clan of lochbuie, i guess thats around where the loch ness monster has been spotted.

          Since my Familytreedna has resulted in celtic/german results for 12 and 25 marker dna testing. Does anyone happen to know what the range of the timeline is for how far they analyze our dna? or is it just what our dna is most similar too in regards to relativity?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tyler89 View Post
            Well actually the British are not considered to be celtic nation considering the fact that Britain was mainly the Anglo-saxons migrating and the Old English we refer to is actually A germanic dialect the anglo-saxons used back in around the 5th century.

            During my lapse of time from writing the original post I was able to discover my paper trail of my paternal lineage dating back to 1550 Southeastern Germany on my dads side.
            my second great grandma on my dads side takes me to Scotland specifically the Mclaine clan of lochbuie, i guess thats around where the loch ness monster has been spotted.

            Since my Familytreedna has resulted in celtic/german results for 12 and 25 marker dna testing. Does anyone happen to know what the range of the timeline is for how far they analyze our dna? or is it just what our dna is most similar too in regards to relativity?
            Matches at the 12 and 25 marker levels don't have a good resolution for estimating "time to most recent common ancestor" (TMRCA). Matches at that level may have a TMRCA with you of over 1,000 years.

            The strong recommendation is to test at least 37 markers and preferably 67 markers when trying to find any useful information about TMRCA. Also, as I posted in reply to you in another thread, in general you can't read a great deal of ethnic/geographic ancestry into yDNA results.

            If you're interested in your overall ethnic/geographic ancestry, you should order an autosomal DNA test, like Family Finder. These tests cover all the lines in your tree, not just your paternal line. Autosomal tests allow you to find cousins in the testing database and also give you estimated percentages for the various ethnic/geographic components of your ancestry.

            Comment


            • #7
              There was no England, no Ireland, no Scotland and no Wales, etc., about 2,000 years ago when the Romans named all of those islands off of the northwestern coast of Europe as the British Isles, and at that time there was a significant Celtic presence there. But time did not stand still, and then some 1,500 years ago the Germanic Saxons settled into the British Isles. And then a few hundred years later came the Germanic Vikings.

              All of those Germanic settlers had a strong impact on what was once the British Isles. But remember, we are talking about a very long time ago.
              Last edited by Tourist; 26 December 2013, 08:42 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                A couple of suggestions:
                First, update the Y-DNA to 37 which is a good cutoff point for finding a fairly recent common ancestor if a cousin has tested, and join a surname DNA project. FTDNA has projects for thousands of names and the administrators can often be a great help in evaluating your results. Two away from 25 is not a very good match.

                Second the ethnic predictions are a very new science and should be taken with a big grain of salt. In other words, they are interesting but should not greatly influence your family tree search.

                If I were you, I would transfer my Ancestry raw data to FTDNA family finder before the holiday sale ends. You will have fewer matches, but will at least have a way to evaluate the matches. FTDNA has some excellent chromosome matching and evaluating tools.

                Read A Beginner's Guide to Genetic Genealogy to better understand what the tests can and can't do. DNA tests are an amazing tool if you know how to use them.
                .
                https://sites.google.com/site/wheato...etic-genealogy

                Happy hunting

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MtnMama View Post
                  Two away from 25 is not a very good match.
                  In general, I agree with you. But I became an exception to that rule. For instance, I found myself with not just one or two 25 marker matches, but with twenty-three 23/25 and 24/25 marker matches. Yet none of those matches appeared at my 37 markers, but I am now listed on that family's project because at 37 markers I am at a GD of only 1 outside of that family's modal range. Then it turned out that that we all are of identical SNP haplogroup AND that there are known historical links between our family names going back hundreds upon hundreds of years.

                  Doug

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                    There was no England, no Ireland, no Scotland and no Wales, etc., about 2,000 years ago when the Romans named all of those islands off of the northwestern coast of Europe as the British Isles, and at that time there was a significant Celtic presence there. But time did not stand still, and then some 1,500 years ago the Germanic Saxons settled into the British Isles. And then a few hundred years later came the Germanic Vikings.

                    All of those Germanic settlers had a strong impact on what was once the British Isles. But remember, we are talking about a very long time ago.
                    Of course there were humans there in the terroritories you have listed..
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxgrove_Quarry

                    The link above dates back to 500,000 years ago evidence.

                    The tribes that lived in the terroritories in the united kindgom are found here:
                    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient.../iron_01.shtml

                    and if your interested in 4,000 years ago United kingdom terroritory here you go:
                    http://www.hartleyfamily.org.uk/NamePage.htm
                    Mainly scots, britons, and picts
                    Last edited by Tyler89; 4 January 2014, 08:20 AM.

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