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HVR2 refined test ~263G

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  • HVR2 refined test ~263G

    OK.... now I am getting somewhere.. don't know where though...

    Sooo...

    I have HVR2 Differences of...
    263G
    309.1c
    315.1c

    So anyone know where those numbers show up.. what race they are?

  • #2
    Shari, those three mutations are so common I don't think they will help much. Mutations don't have "race."

    Bill Hurst

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    • #3
      James Charles Denning, Jr. H2b 129A 152C,263G,309.1C,315.1C

      we continue to match

      Comment


      • #4
        Ah Well.....figures.

        So what do they mean?

        Comment


        • #5
          What do they mean?

          Shari,

          That is a very difficult question to answer, mutations 263G, 309.1C and 315.1C are very common, and are found in several Haplotypes. Those mutations, though common, are not 'defining mutations'. If you check this diagram:

          http://www.familytreedna.com/Hclade.html

          you will see that those mutations are not among the 'red' numbers listed there. If you go to "mito search" and type in those three mutations and search you will find a whole drove of folks with them. You will not, however; find a common Haplogroup, but if you search by haplotype and use, for example, H3; you will find that everyone with H3 will have at least one of those mutations and many will have all three.
          What do they mean? I haven't a clue, but if you find out; PLEASE post it here so we can all know.

          Jeffrey Stewart

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          • #6
            None of these mutations define haplogroups. The haplogroups were originally defined by a different kind of testing called RFLP testing. Certain single nucleotide mutations (the "figures" you refer to) turn out to be unique or almost unique to certain RFLP-defined haplogroups, but others are very widespread. I'm an N1b, and I have all the HVR-2 mutations that you have. If you are trying to establish a genealogical relationship to a particular person through the maternal line, and you are the same haplogroup as that person, and in addition share all these mutations, then you have supported your hypothesis that you are related. mtDNA mutations occur rarely, so the recent common ancestor may have been thousands of years ago. In general, mtDNA is more useful--once your haplogroup has been identified--for looking at the deep ancestral origins of your mother's mother's mother's mother...etc. Taken as a whole in a survey of the population, the frequency with which particular mtDNA haplogroups occur in that population will suggest where the population originated and to what other populations it is related. Hope this helps.

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            • #7
              If I find out I will post it, Jeffrey!!

              I am Halogroup H via R.

              So I am guessing those numbers.... are kind'a all over the place geographically?
              Was hoping to at least see a map of where those numbers show up.

              Before I had that refined test done.. I didn't even have any numbers to hopefully send me in a direction.
              So I am guessing those numbers aren't going to be able to help me out at all??

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jaken24
                Shari,

                That is a very difficult question to answer, mutations 263G, 309.1C and 315.1C are very common, and are found in several Haplotypes. Those mutations, though common, are not 'defining mutations'. If you check this diagram:

                http://www.familytreedna.com/Hclade.html

                you will see that those mutations are not among the 'red' numbers listed there. If you go to "mito search" and type in those three mutations and search you will find a whole drove of folks with them. You will not, however; find a common Haplogroup, but if you search
                Jeffrey Stewart
                I have no idea even how to read that chart... did take a look and did not see them there.
                Sigh ~ ~

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