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  • Need some help choosing the correct DNA test

    Hello,
    I'm kinda new at this and I am trying to choose the correct DNA test(s) but as you can imagine it is quiet confusing for me. I have done a lot of genealogical research and still have a lot more to do; you are always finding more things and will probably never be completely finished but I enjoy doing it so that’s good. I have went to a few seminars, talked to a few people about the testing and I think I know what tests I want but would like a little confirmation to be sure. I’m ready to take the big leap and get the whole package. First a little back ground about me so you can understand what I am searching for. I’m a fifty-six year old man; I am certain that I am Italian, Irish & English decent and possibly German, all my relatives except for a few distant cousins are deceased and I never knew my father. My Grandparents adopted me but my Mother lived with us also but more like a sister. I have three basic questions but would be happy for any advice or help with the testing or would be happy to give any information that may be needed, Thank You.

    1) Y-DNA test, I have been told that with most people start off with the Y-DNA37 is adequate but if you are adopted or do not know who your father was, as in my case it would be best to get the Y-DNA111test. I understand it is more expensive but I am willing to the extra for it. I am not so much looking to have a reunion with my biological father but would very much like to know who he was or as much information about him as possible. I have an idea what his name was, where he was from and his ethnic back ground. I understand this test will not tell me his name and where he was from but I believe I can find this out through the other information I have.

    2) mtFullSequence test, this test appears to be the only one for tracing your mother’s DNA but I was planning on purchasing a Family finder also. Now my question is should I purchase both or is there a kit that is better for what I am looking for? Also is there a kit that would encompass all three?

    3) Comprehensive Genome, is this the test I want or this along with mtFullSequence test what I need? This is where it gets confusing for me. I don’t mind paying for the tests but I don’t want to purchase unneeded tests. Basically I want to get the whole deal and feel if I am going to do it, do it all at once instead of piecemeal.

    Any help or advice would be very much appreciated in choosing the correct tests as I am very new at this. Thank You very much for your help.

    Rocky DeMarco

  • #2
    Hi Rocky,

    I will refer you to this website:
    http://dnaadoption.com/AboutUs.aspx

    These nice folks are experts on the subject and they can
    advise you the best way to go.

    Best of Luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      I am sure you will find more expert advice from the folks specializing in adoptees. I simply would like to point that both the Y -DNA and mt-DNA provide deep ancestry information and people who tested and are coming as close matches may share an ancestor hundreds of years ago.
      Therefore may not provide much direct useful information for genealogy.
      The Family Finder should be a better test to find relationships since it covers the last 5 generations. Its usefullness may be also impacted by your ethnic group -- in case there is a history of some close knit community, of cousins marrying cousins, etc its results may magnify the suggested relationship. The comprehensive genome is simply a combined Y, mt and FF test (on Y goes to 67 markers) so there may be some slight discount as compared to buying individual tests.

      G

      Comment


      • #4
        The link given by ajmr1a1 has much useful information, but just to clarify some of your questions:


        2) mtFullSequence test, this test appears to be the only one for tracing your mother’s DNA but I was planning on purchasing a Family finder also. Now my question is should I purchase both or is there a kit that is better for what I am looking for? Also is there a kit that would encompass all three?
        The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) you received from your mother, it is true, and she received it from her mother, and so on.

        However, it's a very tiny bit of information compared to what is in the nuclear DNA. Family Finder (FF) tests the nuclear DNA. Going the FF route you will pick up cousins, though no one can tell in advance if one will find close cousins or not.

        You indicate by your age that you think most of your close biological relatives have already passed. If that truly is the case then finding a first or even second cousin may be out of the question. That would leave you with a bunch of third cousins or more distant. I will warn you that piecing together a family connectedness from distant cousins on DNA tests is difficult. Even for those of us with developed family trees, placing DNA matches often can't be done.

        Assuming you have the money it would seem that simply going for Comprehensive Genome is the easiest way to cover all bases. One thing to remember, though, is that when those who specialize in helping adoptees find biological relatives via DNA the mantra repeated over and over is to "fish in all ponds". This makes sense as there will be people who test at one company who do not at another.

        Comment


        • #5
          Au contraire, Goldschlager. As of today with MMaddi's help, I have proved that mtDNA can be most useful and valuable in more recent times, not just deep ancestry. There was a myth in my family that one of my ggg grandmothers was 100% Native American. Since my and her mtDNA haplogroup is U3a1b (which is not a NA haplogroup), she could not have been 100% NA. She could have had a NA father, thereby making her 50% NA, BUT not 100% NA. Therefore, mtDNA helped dispel the myth, and also proves it can be a very valuable tool TODAY. As well, as a legacy for our personal future generations, everyone should know their mother's Haplogroup through mtDNA testing. This is my personal experience.
          Last edited by Biblioteque; 4 December 2013, 04:35 PM. Reason: clarify

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by marietta View Post
            Au contraire, Goldschlager. As of today with MMaddi's help, I have proved that mtDNA can be most useful and valuable in more recent times, not just deep ancestry. There was a myth in my family that one of my ggg grandmothers was 100% Native American. Since my and her mtDNA haplogroup is U3a1b (which is not a NA haplogroup), she could not have been 100% NA. She could have had a NA father, thereby making her 50% NA, BUT not 100% NA. Therefore, mtDNA helped dispel the myth, and also proves it can be a very valuable tool TODAY. As well, as a legacy for our personal future generations, everyone should know their mother's Haplogroup through mtDNA testing. This is my personal experience.
            Since the paper discussed in Science last month about a 20,000 year old Siberian burial that matched Native American DNA but had U haplogroup mtDNA, there may be some question remaining. The article suggested as much as 30% of Native American DNA may match European DNA. There is a thread elsewhere on this.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JohnG View Post
              Since the paper discussed in Science last month about a 20,000 year old Siberian burial that matched Native American DNA but had U haplogroup mtDNA, there may be some question remaining. The article suggested as much as 30% of Native American DNA may match European DNA. There is a thread elsewhere on this.
              It's not quite what you posted in the sentence I bolded.

              The 24,000 year old remains of a Siberian boy was of the U mtDNA haplogroup and the R yDNA haplogroup. Both these haplogroups are common among Europeans today.

              However, the 30% figure of matching European DNA you cite is the figure for the 24,000 year old Siberian remains, not modern Native Americans. The Siberian was also similar to Native Americans in his DNA. So, his people were ancestors of both modern Europeans and modern Native Americans.

              This does not mean that Native American DNA matches European DNA. There's no evidence to change the view that the two modern populations are separate populations who happen to have common ancestry over 20,000 years ago, a long time ago. They are two different branches.

              Comment


              • #8
                My post should have included the word "typical". U3a1b is not a "typical" Native American haplogroup. Perhaps, this provides some mitigation. Yes, the jury is still out on the suggestion of the article that "as much as 30% of NA DNA "may" match European DNA, U Haplo specifically." I also read the conflicting views. The article referring to U is too all-encompassing since U has a multitudinous number of clades, sub-clades, sub-sets, etc. For this sageful skeptic, there are too many variables at present in this new theory, and as such, I propose to stand by my post. A new theory is just a new theory until it is proven. And again, everyone should have a record of their mother's haplogroup through mtDNA testing. Your future generations will appreciate it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Rocky,

                  The FTDNA 37 marker test is a great place to begin, offering a lot of useful information.

                  But following that trail, be prepared to go into further testing.

                  One step at a time, my friend, one step at a time!

                  Comment

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