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  • #16
    There is definitely something for you to do - read the experts, rather than try to get all of your information on a Forum!

    Try "The Seven Daughters of Eve, by Bryan Sykes, follow with his "Adam's Curse".

    Then go to "The Journey of Man", by Spencer Wells, and "The Real Eve", by Stephen Oppenheimer.

    When you get brave, try DNA - The Secret of Life", by none other than James D. Watson, of Watson-Crick fame.

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    • #17
      As an OLDPh.D I have discovered that neither age nor degree confers wisdom.

      layman, there is some hope. A new endeavor, HapMap is based on the empirical finding that some autosomal dna does not recombine. In addition the non-recombined dna is inherited in clusters or haplotypes. If this is really the case, it may be possible to trace ancestral lines in autosomes. It will probably take years for this to be available.

      Correction--in an earlier post I mistated that humans differed on 3 million genes. I should have said that they differed on 3 millon base pairs (A,G,C,T) located on around 25,000 genes. To get an idea how little of our inheritance is covered by current tests, the non-recombinant portion of the Y chromosome covers about 25 genes. The mtdna test which amazingly gives a fairly clear picture of our maternal line does not test for our human dna at all. Mitrochondria are essentially bacteria- like organisms living in a symbiotic relationship with our cells. They have"bacterial" genes and chromosomes along with their own mutations and evolutionary history.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by OldMD
        There is definitely something for you to do - read the experts, rather than try to get all of your information on a Forum!

        Try "The Seven Daughters of Eve, by Bryan Sykes, follow with his "Adam's Curse".

        Then go to "The Journey of Man", by Spencer Wells, and "The Real Eve", by Stephen Oppenheimer.

        When you get brave, try DNA - The Secret of Life", by none other than James D. Watson, of Watson-Crick fame.

        AND THEY CAN VERY WELL BE WRONG

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        • #19
          layman, if you are interested,"Ancestry by dna" will give you a geographic breakdown by continent and for an additional fee by region of Europe. This includes percentage contributions to your genome by the regions involved.
          Last edited by josh w.; 16 November 2005, 08:14 PM.

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          • #20
            What do you mean with "and they can very well be wrong" ?

            Yes, I know about the ABD, but too many people say it's flawed so I think it's better to wait for the 3.0 version.
            Have any of you undergone this test?

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            • #21
              Jim can speak for himself, but I think he meant that research is still in its infancy. At least some of the points stated in any of the books have been disputed by others. For example, in my own case one source stated that my haplogroup began near Iraq while another concluded that it was near India. Most of the conclusions in these books should be regarded as theories with some empirical support. A critic would have a field day pointing out flaws in the design of some of the studies. On the other hand, developing some idea of what happened more than 10,000 years ago is an incredible accomplishment.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by layman
                What do you mean with "and they can very well be wrong" ?

                Yes, I know about the ABD, but too many people say it's flawed so I think it's better to wait for the 3.0 version.
                Have any of you undergone this test?


                i am about to start a new thread check it out about people being wrong

                always remember the ebb and flow doctors we sure they were right and did medicine accordingly

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                • #23
                  I did not mean to be overly negative about the state of the research. Like any other human activity science is an imperfect process. Science should be tentative rather than absolute. There is no such thing as a scientific study without flaws in design. Flaws in design, unless they are numerous, do not require that a study be rejected, but rather be treated with some caution. Having said all that, we still have a long way to go in genetic geneology. If Spencer Wells thought we already have a clear picture, he would not have started the Natioal Geographic project.

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