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Best Read on mtDNA Haplogroup J

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  • Best Read on mtDNA Haplogroup J

    You can download the ultimate research paper on mtDNA Haplogroup J at:



    It is a Maters thesis by Piia Serk of University of Tartu. 65 pages, pdf. It is the best read I have come across on Jasmine clan.

  • #2
    Thank you for posting this.

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    • #3
      J* vs J1b

      Excellent MSc thesis - even though I only understood about half of it! I must get to grips with the terminology.

      According to FTDNA I am mtDNA Haplogroup J* with the following CRS differences: 19069T, 16126C and 16519C.

      Reading the paper I easily see the 16126 and 16069 changes to get from CRS to J, but as far as I can find, there is only one reference to the 16519 polymorphism in the whole paper, Fig 6, where it indicates I belong to the J1b subclade. But in the large summary figure at the end, Fig 11, I cannot find any reference to the 16519 pm.

      Does this just mean that there were no 16519C polymorphism samples in the project's total database, or is this a very infrequent polymorphism? And is this the reason I'm J* and not one of the sub-clades?

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      • #4
        As Dentate has noted, Mtdna haplogroups were defined on the basis of RFLP tests. FTdna provides results in terms of a different test, the SNP test. SNP results cannot always be translated to RFLP results with the consequence that there may be ambiguity about subclade membership. Ethnoancestry may provide subclade results-- I am unsure about which subclades they test for.

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        • #5
          P.S. A J* classification suggests that you do not have the specific mutations that define J1 or J2, with definitions ultimately based on RFLP results.
          Last edited by josh w.; 2 December 2005, 11:28 PM.

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          • #6
            P.P.S. I should have explained the RFLP test measures a physically different region than the HVR1 SNP test, but the results for the different regions are correlated.
            Last edited by josh w.; 3 December 2005, 12:02 AM.

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            • #7
              CRS Difference 16159C

              Davidsen

              16159C is a recurrent mutation in just about every sub-branch of mtDNA Haplogroup J, so it is usually ignored even if detected. It can be considered meaningless for purposes of definition of mtDNA sub-groups within J group.
              Your 16069T & 16126C signify J* (with or without 16159C). You are not a J1 or J2 on the matriline.

              Kaiser

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              • #8
                Just a footnote. Berk's position appears to be different from both the "official" approach of relying on RFLP mutations for mtdna haplogroup and subclade definition and Ftdna's approach of using SNP mutations. Noting that the two strategies differ on occasion, the thesis suggests that both types of mutations be included in the definition. At this point however, technically speaking, SNP definitions are suggestive.
                Last edited by josh w.; 5 December 2005, 02:41 PM.

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