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  • Clovis culture

    The Solutrean hypothesis builds on similarities between the Solutrean industry and the later Clovis culture / Clovis points of North America, and suggests that people with Solutrean tool-technology crossed the Ice Age Atlantic by moving along the pack ice edge, using survival skills similar to those of modern Eskimo people. The migrants arrived in northeastern North America and served as the donor culture for what eventually developed into Clovis tool-making technology. Archaeologists Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley suggest that the Clovis point derived from the points of the Solutrean culture of southern France (19,000 BP) through the Cactus Hill points of Virginia (16,000 BP) to the Clovis point.[1][2] This would mean that people would have had to move from the Bay of Biscay across the edge of the Atlantic ice sheet to North America. Supporters of this hypothesis believe it would have been feasible using traditional Eskimo techniques still in use today,[1] while others argue that the conditions at the time would have made such a journey unlikely.[3]

    The idea of a Clovis-Solutrean link remains controversial and does not enjoy wide acceptance. The hypothesis is challenged by large gaps in time between the Clovis and Solutrean eras, a lack of evidence of Solutrean seafaring, lack of specific Solutrean features in Clovis technology, and other issues.

    It must have been these people who brought the O bloodgroup and R1b to America.

  • #2
    Those are interesting theory's so thanks for bringing them up. Although as you correctly point out the evidence does not look convincing enough to embrace it. That is , a large scale immigration. However I personally believe that ancient populations abilities to navigate oceans has been greatly underestimated. I think early man has traveled from the old world to the new world many many times before previously accepted dates that is. Not in large numbers but enough to influence the populations of the new world genecticaly.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Brunetmj View Post
      Those are interesting theory's so thanks for bringing them up. Although as you correctly point out the evidence does not look convincing enough to embrace it. That is , a large scale immigration. However I personally believe that ancient populations abilities to navigate oceans has been greatly underestimated. I think early man has traveled from the old world to the new world many many times before previously accepted dates that is. Not in large numbers but enough to influence the populations of the new world genecticaly.
      49% of NA people and 47% of Irish people belong to bloodgroup O so there is an ancient connection there.

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      • #4
        Blood type has nothing to do with Ethnicity

        Originally posted by 1798 View Post
        49% of NA people and 47% of Irish people belong to bloodgroup O so there is an ancient connection there.
        Eskimo are Chinese not Native American.

        Eskimo are the only ones who have East Asian dna all other Native American do not have East Asian dna.

        Originally posted by 1798 View Post
        The Solutrean hypothesis builds on similarities between the Solutrean industry and the later Clovis culture / Clovis points of North America, and suggests that people with Solutrean tool-technology crossed the Ice Age Atlantic by moving along the pack ice edge, using survival skills similar to those of modern Eskimo people. The migrants arrived in northeastern North America and served as the donor culture for what eventually developed into Clovis tool-making technology. Archaeologists Dennis Stanford and Bruce Bradley suggest that the Clovis point derived from the points of the Solutrean culture of southern France (19,000 BP) through the Cactus Hill points of Virginia (16,000 BP) to the Clovis point.[1][2] This would mean that people would have had to move from the Bay of Biscay across the edge of the Atlantic ice sheet to North America. Supporters of this hypothesis believe it would have been feasible using traditional Eskimo techniques still in use today,[1] while others argue that the conditions at the time would have made such a journey unlikely.[3]

        The idea of a Clovis-Solutrean link remains controversial and does not enjoy wide acceptance. The hypothesis is challenged by large gaps in time between the Clovis and Solutrean eras, a lack of evidence of Solutrean seafaring, lack of specific Solutrean features in Clovis technology, and other issues.

        It must have been these people who brought the O bloodgroup and R1b to America.

        Comment


        • #5
          Some years ago I saw an article about a boat anchor being found in the Pacific ocean just off of the California coast. The boat anchor was in the shape of a big donut, a round rock having a hole in the middle of it and it was historically identified with an ancient Chinese type of boat anchor of several thousand years ago.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by madman View Post
            Blood type has nothing to do with Ethnicity



            Eskimo are Chinese not Native American.

            Eskimo are the only ones who have East Asian dna all other Native American do not have East Asian dna.
            Is it the Eskimoes that belong to bloodgroup "O"?
            Is it not true that we inherit our blood types from our parents?

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