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Please ignore mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplogroups

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  • Darren
    replied
    I am going to post this in a new thread since it is not really applicable to this older thread.

    http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...520#post418520

    -Darren
    Family Tree DNA

    Leave a comment:


  • bgw3133
    replied
    Autosomal DNA

    I am female. To learn something on my father's line should I get the autosomal test?
    His paternal gr.father was b.1830 Scotland. I do not know about the gr.mother other than her name and supposedly b.Louisiana. I know more on the gr.father's mother's Scottish line into late 1600s.

    My father's father was b.TX of Scottish and ___ descent. My father's mother was b.TX but her father b.Cuba/Mexico and her mother b.Germany.
    Cuba/Mexico line to 1805 (the father in Spanish army). The German line to about 1815 in Germany.
    =What do you think is best: autosomal or mtFullSequence or what? Or do I know enough that additional info is a waste of money?

    JCW

    Leave a comment:


  • twang
    replied
    I'm most interested in my mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplogroups. Later on when the tests get better and cheaper I'd like to explore the rest of my DNA.

    Leave a comment:


  • fbirder
    replied
    Originally posted by madman View Post
    Mtdna is just a protein
    Astounding ignorance!

    Leave a comment:


  • vinnie
    replied
    Speaking of mtDNA: http://extremelongevity.net/2013/05/...an-slow-aging/

    Leave a comment:


  • Táltos
    replied
    Originally posted by madman View Post
    If I could I would its what makes you get older.
    Good luck with that madman. If this is a concern for you I suggest a diet rich in antioxidants, as it may help repair or rejuvenate damaged mtDNA from the aging process. Who knows maybe the scientists will find the "Fountain of Youth" from our mtDNA.

    Javelin well said-"Take all your mitochondria out of all your cells, let's see how long you can live without them. "

    Leave a comment:


  • madman
    replied
    Originally posted by Javelin View Post
    Take all your mitochondria out of all your cells, let's see how long you can live without them.
    If I could I would its what makes you get older.

    Leave a comment:


  • Javelin
    replied
    Originally posted by madman View Post
    mtdna is worthless.
    Take all your mitochondria out of all your cells, let's see how long you can live without them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Táltos
    replied
    Originally posted by madman View Post
    Males pass on there ydna & xdna.

    Females pass on ether of there xdna.

    and mtdna is worthless.
    The point is mtDNA cannot be passed on from males. Males also do not have the ability to pass on their father's X chromosome. mtDNA is the powerhouse of the cell hardly something I would call useless.

    And though I find the X chromosome absolutely intriguing, the science is not there to even tell for the females with a lot of certainty which came from her mother and which is from her father's MOTHER.

    Leave a comment:


  • madman
    replied
    Originally posted by 1796 View Post
    Actually I am well aware that it is the X chromosome that determines if the child will be female and the yDNA that determines if the child is male.

    My point was that only males can pass the yDNA to their male offspring. Though a male can inherit the mtDNA they cannot PASS it on to their offspring. Only the females can do this. Hence the direct maternal line.
    Males pass on there ydna & xdna.

    Females pass on ether of there xdna.

    and mtdna is worthless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Táltos
    replied
    Originally posted by madman View Post
    I think you meant this

    Man (YDNA / XDNA) + Woman (XDNA) = CHILDREN TO PASS ON DNA!

    Mtdna is just a protein its not the same as Xdna
    Actually I am well aware that it is the X chromosome that determines if the child will be female and the yDNA that determines if the child is male.

    My point was that only males can pass the yDNA to their male offspring. Though a male can inherit the mtDNA they cannot PASS it on to their offspring. Only the females can do this. Hence the direct maternal line.

    Leave a comment:


  • madman
    replied
    Originally posted by 1796 View Post
    Actually knox if you paid attention to what I said toward the end, is that I find value in all the tests. I am not a big fan of the mtDNA as my haplogroup is large and common, and a lot of the newer subclades haven't really been studied that I know of. The only thing it can tell me is that my direct maternal line is European. As for the yDNA it looks like you can get better resolution with that. I can't wait to upgrade my brother's test to more makers and or SNPs. Hopefully i can get a clearer picture. It is also obvious that you will not get every single one of your ancestors represented in your autosomal tests. But the tests do provide some answers so I will take what I can get out of them.

    I like to look at some of my matches who took the Y and Mito tests, and sometimes wonder could this particular lineage represent my direct paternal great grandmother? Of course I will never know unless I can find out if she had any siblings that had children.

    Another poster pointed out some matches will only talk to people who share their same yDNA and mtDNA lines. That is totally crazy to do. I have not come across that problem that I am aware of anyway. Most who I have tried to correspond with do respond and try to find a connection.

    The point is the Y and the Mito are very important due to a basic simple fact.
    Man (yDNA) + Woman (mtDNA)= CHILDREN TO PASS ON DNA! (At least in most cases LOL)
    I think you meant this

    Man (YDNA / XDNA) + Woman (XDNA) = CHILDREN TO PASS ON DNA!

    Mtdna is just a protein its not the same as Xdna
    Last edited by madman; 24 May 2013, 01:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Táltos
    replied
    Originally posted by djknox View Post
    Yes all tests provide some meaning. But each of us are the net result of hundreds, thousands of maternal & paternal lines. To focus on only 2 of them and place some disproportionate value doesn't "seem" sensible to me. However, I am curious about whether people do think there is some disproportionate value to their paternal & maternal lines? In my opinion, many hold this disproportionate value simply because they have nothing else to grasp onto, as autosomal doesn't provide much beyond several generations!

    Mine is not an indictment of mtdna or ydna - I actually like those tests BECAUSE they do offer me something to chase - BUT, he is correct in that they represent an insignificant portion of one's genealogy and thus they should be remembered in such context.
    Actually knox if you paid attention to what I said toward the end, is that I find value in all the tests. I am not a big fan of the mtDNA as my haplogroup is large and common, and a lot of the newer subclades haven't really been studied that I know of. The only thing it can tell me is that my direct maternal line is European. As for the yDNA it looks like you can get better resolution with that. I can't wait to upgrade my brother's test to more makers and or SNPs. Hopefully i can get a clearer picture. It is also obvious that you will not get every single one of your ancestors represented in your autosomal tests. But the tests do provide some answers so I will take what I can get out of them.

    I like to look at some of my matches who took the Y and Mito tests, and sometimes wonder could this particular lineage represent my direct paternal great grandmother? Of course I will never know unless I can find out if she had any siblings that had children.

    Another poster pointed out some matches will only talk to people who share their same yDNA and mtDNA lines. That is totally crazy to do. I have not come across that problem that I am aware of anyway. Most who I have tried to correspond with do respond and try to find a connection.

    The point is the Y and the Mito are very important due to a basic simple fact.
    Man (yDNA) + Woman (mtDNA)= CHILDREN TO PASS ON DNA! (At least in most cases LOL)

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by djknox View Post
    Fair enough - but out of curiousity, what has mtdna told you about your long range family tree? Has it told you who they are (by tribe) or where they lived (by region) or more importantly, at WHAT TIME were they part of that TRIBE or living in THAT region? Just curious to know what some people have learned from mtdna & Ydna haplogroups?
    I believe that my U5 MTdna line came to Ireland in the Mesolithic and my Y-
    Z156 line came here in the Bronze age.
    I have found a lot of cousins but not by dna tests.

    Leave a comment:


  • josh w.
    replied
    Originally posted by djknox View Post
    Fair enough - but out of curiousity, what has mtdna told you about your long range family tree? Has it told you who they are (by tribe) or where they lived (by region) or more importantly, at WHAT TIME were they part of that TRIBE or living in THAT region? Just curious to know what some people have learned from mtdna & Ydna haplogroups?
    I have an Ashkenazi background and my PF is 100% Near Eastern--Jewish. However my Mt dna subclade clearly originated in Europe rather than Asia. The history of Jews in Eastern Europe suggests that this line entered the Jewish population no earlier than the 1300s.

    Leave a comment:

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