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Subjective Paradigm Shift in Genealogy?

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  • #16
    Did the British-of-other-origins preferentially settle in one or another American colony? Were some colonies more welcoming of otherwise-pedigreed immigrants?

    Psychologically, those who had managed a separation from one society and integration into another would seem particularly prepared to become colonists.

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    • #17
      Socio-economic class also had something to do with it. Puritans and Quakers were more or less self-sufficient and self-disciplined. Then there were indentured servants who would've been more oriented toward agriculture (e.g. Virginia). The Dutch colony of New Netherland seems to have been quite open to other European Protestant colonists.

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      • #18
        I know Mass Bay Colony was rather religiously intolerant and that Pennsylvania and Maryland were somewhat religiously tolerant. My question was whether there was colonial intolerance of the ethnically different.

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        • #19
          I found a reference that states the Middle Colonies were both ethnically and religiously tolerant. I suppose, then, the other colonies were not.

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          • #20
            Yeah, Maryland is well known for its Catholic foundation, although the eastern shore was virtually Protestant Virginia. Virginia was ruled by Royalists, and there was friction during the Cromwell era. In my own maternal threads back then, there looks to be English (and apparently Welsh), Dutch and Swedish (apparently with Finnish) pretty much blended in.

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            • #21
              I have ancestors who were in New Amsterdam beginning in the 1630s, who were in constant trouble, and in and out of court. One of the cases brought against them was for "harboring a Quaker". Peter Stuyvesant was known for intolerance of Quakers.

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              • #22
                True.

                Originally posted by tomcat View Post
                I know Mass Bay Colony was rather religiously intolerant and that Pennsylvania and Maryland were somewhat religiously tolerant. My question was whether there was colonial intolerance of the ethnically different.
                One way to decipher this is through the Freeman's Oath. In Mass. Bay Colony, it was a requirement to take this oath which was administered by the church. One could not socially function without taking this oath. On the other hand, in Connecticut, one could take the Freeman's Oath without belonging to a church. Such was the case in my line.

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                • #23
                  The direct maternal line that I put together, largely based on Ancestry.com stuff, has a few genrations in Newtown, Long Island. The Dutch permitted that English settlement to be officially set up there. In my case, it looks like they were Presbyterians. Then that female line goes back to New haven Connecticut before going back to England. There is a case, though, of a marriage being performed in Rhode Island, and not New Haven. A paternal offshoot line (Phillips) goes back to Massachusetts, and a comment that Zarubabel Phillips was a cantankerous character and left MA to settle on the eastern end of Long Island. From there his son moved to Newtown (Queens County, apparently).
                  Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 30 April 2013, 07:50 AM.

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                  • #24
                    'Language and Country Borders'

                    If you are trying to sus out ethnic origins by using modern language and borders you are taking the wrong approach.

                    The best approach is to map haplogroup distributions and see how they coincide with major geographic and climate areas. These will tend to be the long time 'millennial' residents of an area.

                    Secondly, look for patterns of migration in times of a culture's ascendance out of that culture's homeland: e.g. the English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and the Netherlands basically were the major players of the colonial era. These will be the recent migrants to an area.

                    What I find interesting is the Siberian migrations that populated the Americas about 10,000 years ago and yet FTDNA has a Y-DNA haplotype in the Americas as long ago as 50,000 years but no coinciding female mtDNA haplotype for that time period? Where did they find this anomaly?

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                    • #25
                      Could you clarify please?

                      Originally posted by B52 View Post
                      If you are trying to sus out ethnic origins by using modern language and borders you are taking the wrong approach.

                      The best approach is to map haplogroup distributions and see how they coincide with major geographic and climate areas. These will tend to be the long time 'millennial' residents of an area.

                      Secondly, look for patterns of migration in times of a culture's ascendance out of that culture's homeland: e.g. the English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and the Netherlands basically were the major players of the colonial era. These will be the recent migrants to an area.

                      What I find interesting is the Siberian migrations that populated the Americas about 10,000 years ago and yet FTDNA has a Y-DNA haplotype in the Americas as long ago as 50,000 years but no coinciding female mtDNA haplotype for that time period? Where did they find this anomaly?
                      I'm uncertain as to whom you are directing the "language and country borders" statement to. So I'd like to re-emphasize my original statement.

                      My research results provide indisputable primary sourced records that flesh out the morphing or altering of surnames from the Dutch/German/Danish languages into English. Admittedly, I fell into these results by accident, but once I did, it all made clear sense. It's one approach to finding solutions.

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