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Best test for my mother to take

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  • Best test for my mother to take

    I have recently had my yDNA tested and am also interested in learning more about other possible genealogy connections through DNA testing. My father passed away several years ago but my mother is still living as well as a sister. I am thinking of having my mother do a test but am not sure what I should recommend to her.

    Can anyone give advice on what gives the most bang for the buck and why? I am guessing that having her take the test rather than me is beneficial because she is one generation back which I think would give better confirmation of any matches.

    My interest are strictly for genealogy and tracing my ancestry as far back as possible.

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Two tests are available for females: mtDNA and autosomal.

    If you plan on doing autosomal testing, you should definitely have your mom take that test, since you have only 50% of her autosomal DNA.

    For mtDNA, you and your sister inherited that from your mom, so either of you could be tested for mtDNA later if you don't have your mom tested for it now. mtDNA is typically passed down in-tact, unlike autosomal DNA.

    So priority should be autosomal, and if you want to test her for both, that's fine too.

    Elise

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    • #3
      I would say, don't bother with the MtDNA, go straight for the autosomal. And value-wise, at the risk of promoting another company, your best bet is to test at 23andMe first and then transfer your results to FTDNA (unless you're part Ashkenazi Jewish, in which case 23andMe is worthless.) Next step is to upload results to Gedmatch (which should be working by the time you receive them) and phase your mother's DNA against yours. Phasing eliminates a lot of the noise and is more accurate.

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      • #4
        I went ahead and ordered the FF for my mother while it was on sale. I am mainly interested in unlocking some mysteries on my fathers side so when I get her results should I upload her and my FF results to gedmatch and "phase" them? Will that assist me in determining if my matches are on the maternal or paternal side?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Kevin? View Post
          I went ahead and ordered the FF for my mother while it was on sale. I am mainly interested in unlocking some mysteries on my fathers side so when I get her results should I upload her and my FF results to gedmatch and "phase" them? Will that assist me in determining if my matches are on the maternal or paternal side?
          If you've taken the FF test, it shows both maternal and paternal sides, but won't distinguish which is which. When you get your mother's results back, run "Not in Common With Mom" on your matches, and the results, with only a few minor exceptions, will represent your paternal matches on FF.

          You can extend those paternal matches by uploading you and Mom to Gedmatch and phasing your matches with hers. It will give you another paternal-side list (which will include the paternal FF matches, but also 23&Me, etc.)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by boi568 View Post
            If you've taken the FF test, it shows both maternal and paternal sides, but won't distinguish which is which. When you get your mother's results back, run "Not in Common With Mom" on your matches, and the results, with only a few minor exceptions, will represent your paternal matches on FF.
            ... Unless you're Ashkenazi. In which case those with 50%+ more shared dna are from your mom's side, and it's anyone's guess beyond that.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sjadelson View Post
              ... Unless you're Ashkenazi. In which case those with 50%+ more shared dna are from your mom's side, and it's anyone's guess beyond that.
              If you're Ashkenazi, that "Not in Common With Mom" set will still be Dad, except it will be more likely to be missing a chunk of cousins who are primarily Dad, but also have a lesser connection to Mom.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by boi568 View Post
                If you're Ashkenazi, that "Not in Common With Mom" set will still be Dad, except it will be more likely to be missing a chunk of cousins who are primarily Dad, but also have a lesser connection to Mom.
                ...and a goodly portion of "In Common With Mom" are just as likely to be more closely related to Dad.

                *sigh*

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