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  • #31
    Originally posted by econnore View Post
    I just found a second marriage record (for a son of George & Josephine's) that shows Josephine's maiden name as Miscavage. Look at what I sent you to confirm it's the right people in the right place.

    That name can be spelled many ways. Just change up the vowels but I've seen the name as Miskevich, too. Miskewicz. Maybe Mesevicius.
    Thank you so very much econnore for finding this. It is indeed my grandfather's brother! And this could definitely clear up the last name. However I am totally confused again, why on Earth are they listing Slovakia as both my great grandparents places of birth??? That is the first time I ever saw or heard that one.

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    • #32
      good luck!



      The other marriage record says they were both born in Lithuania. By 1946, when the second brother's marriage took place, it was politically correct to say anything other than Soviet Union. Perhaps they really were Slovaks born in Lithuania, and felt more comfortable mentioning Slovakia.

      My Lithuanian-born grandfather changed his first AND last names several times during his life. Not just the spellings, the entire names. From Vladislavos/Wladislaw to Walter to Edward. From Niewerdowski to Neverdauskas to Neverdovski to Rudnikoff to Rudnic to Rudner. Sometimes said he was born in Poland. Sometimes said Germany. Later on, he said he was born in Chicago.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by econnore View Post


        The other marriage record says they were both born in Lithuania. By 1946, when the second brother's marriage took place, it was politically correct to say anything other than Soviet Union. Perhaps they really were Slovaks born in Lithuania, and felt more comfortable mentioning Slovakia.

        My Lithuanian-born grandfather changed his first AND last names several times during his life. Not just the spellings, the entire names. From Vladislavos/Wladislaw to Walter to Edward. From Niewerdowski to Neverdauskas to Neverdovski to Rudnikoff to Rudnic to Rudner. Sometimes said he was born in Poland. Sometimes said Germany. Later on, he said he was born in Chicago.
        That does make sense about not wanting to say the Soviet Union. I can always remember disdain from grandfather about people being sent to Siberia because of the Soviets.

        Yes it certainly sounds that your Lithuanian ancestors gave you a hard time as well with name and place changes. Now I don't know if I should let myself go out on a total limb, but what the heck. I just found a record for a Geo. Krackoski a marriage license, he was supposed to marry a Tekla Hrycin (definitely does not look like Josephine) The license was issued but it does not appear that they had been married. It says no duplicate certificate was returned. Geo. Krackoski on the record both he and Tekla are born in Galicia,Austria. Geo. Krackoski's birth year seems too early 1877 instead of 1891.

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        • #34
          In 2009, I traveled to Laukuva, the tiny village in Silale, Lithuania, where my grandfather was born. During that trip, I met an older lady named Neverdauskiene (widow of a distant cousin) and through the interpreter she told me that she'd been sent to a work camp in Siberia and didn't get back home to Laukuva until 1957! The interpreter told me that the villagers had been rounded up in their summer clothes and exiled to a much colder climate.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by econnore View Post
            In 2009, I traveled to Laukuva, the tiny village in Silale, Lithuania, where my grandfather was born. During that trip, I met an older lady named Neverdauskiene (widow of a distant cousin) and through the interpreter she told me that she'd been sent to a work camp in Siberia and didn't get back home to Laukuva until 1957! The interpreter told me that the villagers had been rounded up in their summer clothes and exiled to a much colder climate.
            How horrible. The fear of Siberia was certainly something hanging over their heads on a daily basis. On a lighter note that is terrific that you have been to one of your ancestral homelands.

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            • #36
              Maybe he was married more than once and that other woman is the 1st wife and she died. Or the second wife depending on year. It wouldn't be odd to have had been previously married and not told anyone or not talked about it- especially if there were no children from the union.


              Originally posted by 1796 View Post
              How horrible. The fear of Siberia was certainly something hanging over their heads on a daily basis. On a lighter note that is terrific that you have been to one of your ancestral homelands.

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