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  • Finding maternal relatives

    I have submitted DNA from my 99 year old father in hopes of tracking his line beyond our immigrant ancestor with some certainty.

    I have submitted my own in hopes that some shot in the dark may find a connection to my adopted mother's ancestry. The only thing we think we know is the state and region where she was born. The surname on her original birth certificate, we feel, was probably ficticious. My real question is this: Would it be of any great value in this search to submit a sample of my brothers' DNA since I am looking for a female line? Other than me, they are the only blood relatives of hers that are known.

  • #2
    Your brother's MtDNA should be the same as yours. If you have had your MtDNA tested, there's really no reason to have him tested for MtDNA. The fact that you are submitting your father's Y-DNA makes it no reason for your brother to submit his sample for Y-DNA either. Your MtDNA test and your father's Y-DNA test should take care of all the information your brother would be able to contribute.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Judith Andrews
      I have submitted DNA from my 99 year old father in hopes of tracking his line beyond our immigrant ancestor with some certainty.

      I have submitted my own in hopes that some shot in the dark may find a connection to my adopted mother's ancestry. The only thing we think we know is the state and region where she was born. The surname on her original birth certificate, we feel, was probably ficticious. My real question is this: Would it be of any great value in this search to submit a sample of my brothers' DNA since I am looking for a female line? Other than me, they are the only blood relatives of hers that are known.
      judith your dad and son should be the same ydna but different mtdna assuming he is your moms son he would match you mtdna and your dads ydna

      that said your problem is locational and one alot of people have
      I run 6 locational studies what states and regions do you have?
      for the sake of an example lets say this you moms people came from chelsea ma and your dads people came to quincy ill. from longford. putting your mtdna in Chelsea would be the place to park your mtdna and your dad in his surname project again for the sake of the story say he is a farrell and he enters that project here is what you get he is compared to farrells and the longford projects where more of them will come from. and you do his mtdna and look for your dads mom in hannibal/quincy the next thing i would do is find a cousin preferably a son ending a line of females from your moms family why?
      to check if she was an daughter of the sister of her adopted family
      maybe they matche and maybe the same ydna comes up

      many times sisters got pregnant and gave the baby to a sister and her husband to raise or the sister died in birth.i have a theresa denning who had lawrence denning and larry was adopted by theresa's sister Mary Ann denning who was married to james dunlea. the original dad was never mentioned and i never saw theresa mentioned again
      so if your larry what do you do ? you join the chelsea &dunlea project and look for ydna matches of the same time period and mtdna will show you match your mom but really her sister .nut the ydna matches duggans alot

      who knows maybe theresa after the birth of larry actually wed the jerk who for the minute is names duggan. larry tests and matches james lawrence duggan son of James duggan and theresa denning. james is born in the same or neighboring town 4 yrs latter.

      do you think that could be found i do . stuff like this happened alot before 1973. lol you would never know until you matched lawrence dunlea With james lawrence duggan maybe you see it cause you dont match james f. dunlea your brothers ydna but you do his mtdna.
      maybe and probably james lawrence and lawrence played together

      the theresa and maryann dunlea actually happened.i dont know if larry knew but the paperwork showed it.so it wasnt hidden .

      so here is the questions
      where when who find out if the mom went away or just to an aunts three towns over . because that mtdna probably still remains in the towns around there
      we need to get you locational projects

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      • #4
        tracing maternal lines

        Originally posted by Judith Andrews
        I have submitted DNA from my 99 year old father in hopes of tracking his line beyond our immigrant ancestor with some certainty.

        I have submitted my own in hopes that some shot in the dark may find a connection to my adopted mother's ancestry. The only thing we think we know is the state and region where she was born. The surname on her original birth certificate, we feel, was probably ficticious. My real question is this: Would it be of any great value in this search to submit a sample of my brothers' DNA since I am looking for a female line? Other than me, they are the only blood relatives of hers that are known.
        Judith, have you considered consulting the old Census records that would have included your mother while she was a child? Census records are sealed for 70 yrs. once taken, to protect the privacy of the respondents; however, your mother's family has passed that point. Those records are in the public domain now...and your information from your mother's birth certificate could point you in the right direction.

        I discovered, via census, that my gr-grandmother had three brothers and a sister that I had not known about. In tracing them, I was able to learn more about her.

        Clara

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        • #5
          .................................................. ..
          Last edited by Kir; 9 October 2005, 04:38 AM.

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