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no mtDNA matches : rare DNA??

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  • no mtDNA matches : rare DNA??

    My mtDNA data has been in the FTDNA database for 2 years, but I've never had a single match -- not even a low resolution one. I'm wondering how common this is and what, if anything, it means.

    BTW, my maternal ancestry comes from southern Italy. I'm in haplogroup J* and have 5 mutations.

    My husband, on the other hand, has a slew of low resolution matches on his mtDNA and Y-DNA. His ancestry on both sides is from Germany, Austria & thereabouts.

    So, what are other folks's experience? Is anyone else out there matchless??

    thanks!
    Sherry

  • #2
    Like your husband, I have zillions of mtDNA matches--well, 32 at last count, anyway, and lots of Y also. My wife, like you, has zero matches to her mtDNA, though it has only been a short time. Some people just spread their genes around more than others!

    Probably at least as important, if not more so, is the nature of the FTDNA database. It is NOT a random sampling of the world population. If your mtDNA is very common in Southern Italy but very few Southern Italians bought kits from FTDNA, you will have few matches; your husband's DNA type could be rare as hen's teeth, but folks from Germany and Austria might be keenly interested in Genealogy or, because a local newpaper article had a feature on Family Tree DNA, many of them sent in kits. See the problem? Likely your type is more rare than your husband's but it is not possible to say by how much or just what this means.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by phillygal
      My mtDNA data has been in the FTDNA database for 2 years, but I've never had a single match -- not even a low resolution one. I'm wondering how common this is and what, if anything, it means.

      BTW, my maternal ancestry comes from southern Italy. I'm in haplogroup J* and have 5 mutations.

      My husband, on the other hand, has a slew of low resolution matches on his mtDNA and Y-DNA. His ancestry on both sides is from Germany, Austria & thereabouts.

      So, what are other folks's experience? Is anyone else out there matchless??

      thanks!
      Sherry

      i run the frosinone project A MTDNA project you might want to join as a second project
      here are things you need to do
      i assume like my wifes family her family migrated from san danato frosinone and went to areas like brighton ma, columbus ohio venesualia scotland ect
      if this is true find childhood friends from that area . small italian towns shared mtdna alot beause of small female starter groups
      my first two mtdnas are my son hrv1 519c and hrv2 263G,315.1C
      the second mtdna is again hrv1 519c and hasnt done the hrv2 yet
      i was shocked . so by getting people probably from the same area as your mom
      bingo i bet. it might be rare but i bet not where your moms from
      btw my son has 834 hrv1 matches and hrv2 64 matchs
      where ever your moms is from start a mtdna project like i did in frosinone ,chelsea,longford.
      maybe one at each end of her migration

      did you sign release form?
      Last edited by Jim Denning; 11 September 2005, 05:55 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dentate
        Like your husband, I have zillions of mtDNA matches--well, 32 at last count, anyway, and lots of Y also. My wife, like you, has zero matches to her mtDNA, though it has only been a short time. Some people just spread their genes around more than others!

        Probably at least as important, if not more so, is the nature of the FTDNA database. It is NOT a random sampling of the world population. If your mtDNA is very common in Southern Italy but very few Southern Italians bought kits from FTDNA, you will have few matches; your husband's DNA type could be rare as hen's teeth, but folks from Germany and Austria might be keenly interested in Genealogy or, because a local newpaper article had a feature on Family Tree DNA, many of them sent in kits. See the problem? Likely your type is more rare than your husband's but it is not possible to say by how much or just what this means.

        ydna is surname and location
        mtdna is all locations thus you need locational studys to go with surname studies
        my surnames denning farrell duggan cogan are all locationaly tied to longford chelsea and frosinone
        thuse i hope to get all sorts of conections across the ocean

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        • #5
          Originally posted by phillygal
          My mtDNA data has been in the FTDNA database for 2 years, but I've never had a single match -- not even a low resolution one. I'm wondering how common this is and what, if anything, it means.

          BTW, my maternal ancestry comes from southern Italy. I'm in haplogroup J* and have 5 mutations.

          My husband, on the other hand, has a slew of low resolution matches on his mtDNA and Y-DNA. His ancestry on both sides is from Germany, Austria & thereabouts.

          So, what are other folks's experience? Is anyone else out there matchless??

          thanks!
          Sherry
          I'm also in the mtDNA haplogroup J*. I have one low resolution match and it's not perfect and no high resolution matches at all. However, I have over 400 exact 12 marker matches and over 40 high resolution matches on my Y-DNA test. It seems even common mtDNA haplogroups don't have many matches. One reasons for this may be that the database for mtDNA testees is still small. But aside from this, I'd say the lack of matches among mtDNA testees suggests that more women had descendants than did men throughout humanity's ancestry, and so there is more variation in the mtDNA pool.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by paitenceofjob
            I'm also in the mtDNA haplogroup J*. I have one low resolution match and it's not perfect and no high resolution matches at all. However, I have over 400 exact 12 marker matches and over 40 high resolution matches on my Y-DNA test. It seems even common mtDNA haplogroups don't have many matches. One reasons for this may be that the database for mtDNA testees is still small. But aside from this, I'd say the lack of matches among mtDNA testees suggests that more women had descendants than did men throughout humanity's ancestry, and so there is more variation in the mtDNA pool.

            it probably means your females had sons and my wifes had daughters
            thats why location is important because women in one area might be more prolific with sons

            i am working on an idea with mtdna. something thats missing is a followup on the family trees associated with mtdnas
            my wife had 3 girls of 4 ,her mom had 2 girls of 3 and her mom had 4 of 7 i believe.
            or maybe their were wars and the men died before reproducing

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