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  • Dna Print Test

    Hi again! Here is a question perhaps someone can answer for me. Being female, I had my MTDNA tested and received the results about a year ago. Now, my sister will do the DNA PRINT TEST. This is the one that tells one what percentage is European, Asian, Native American and African. I think this is what the test is called. It is suggested that she do the 2.5. What both my sister and I want to know is, will her test results work for both of us? Will her results me mine also? Could she carry different results than if I did it, or would be automatically match because we are sisters? Thanks, Nan

  • #2
    Unless you are an identical twin, in theory, the test results would be different because each of you has inherited a different combination of your four grandparents' genes from your two parents. That being said, the "DNA Print test" is in my opinion, a pretty useless test. There are many reasons for this, including insufficient DNA markers and lack of specificity, to give more than the most general picture. You might want to look back through the postings on this site from people from Greece and Italy whose results told them they were 10% or more Native American. I think you can learn more by looking in the mirror.

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    • #3
      Dna Print Test

      Thank you for your swift response. I appreciate your taking the time to give me an answer. I wonder how the body works? It seems as if two people are related as sister's or brother's are, that each one would have inherited exactly the same. I guess this means that one brother or sister might inherit genes from one or two grandparents, while another might inherit from the other set of grandndparents on either their mothers or fathers side of the family. Is this why we sometimes cannot share kidney's, or liver's from brother's or sister's in some cases?
      Also... If your grandparents on one side were Italian and the otherside were English, let's say, would one sibling be more Italian and the other, more English? Very curious!
      I hope these are not dumb questions! This is the first time I have ever ran across this. Thanks again, Nan

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      • #4
        Essentially what you have said is correct, although there are not really genes that make someone Italian or English.

        You inherit half your genes from each parent (except mtDNA and YDNA, which come exclusivley from mother and father respectively).

        Your reproductive cells are created during a special process of cell division called meiosis. This is different from the usual doubling and then separation of genes that happens with ordinary cell division. In meiosis, the end result is a reproductive cell (sperm or egg) with half the usual number of genes--one copy of each, instead of two. That is why your children end up with the same number of genes as you--one pair of each--when sperm and egg unite.

        When this process of meiosis happens, it contains a special step in which the chromosomes (sets of genes) that you inherited from your father and those you inherited from your mother line up, and do a sort of little dance, exchanging segments in a nearly random fashion, to create a new set of chromosomes that are a mix of what came from your parents. Therefore, the set of genes that your child gets from you is a mix of the genes from your two parents. If this did not occur, your child would get only your mother's genes or your father's genes, but not both. Because this process takes place both in you and in your partner, your children inherit genes from all four grandparents, instead of from only one on your side and one on your partner's. This reshufflilng leads to endless variety in the combinations of genes that we can inherit.

        Identical twins develop from a single egg after fertilization, that splits into two embryos. They are, therefore, clones. Strange, but true. With the exception of clones, brothers and sisters will each have inherited a different combination of genes. So if there really were such things as "English genes" and "Italian genes," and you had one set of Italian grandparents and one set of English grandparents, you and your sibling would each be half Italian and half English, though which particular English and Italian genes you each received would differ. On the other hand, if each grandfather were Italian and each grandmother were English--two ethnically mixed couples--then you and your sibling would end up with *different* proportions of English and Italian genes depending on what gene mixture comes along on the chromosome you inherit from each parent. This variability in composition will tend to get greater and greater with each generation, until, ultimately, there will be ancestors from whom you inherit not a single gene. But they are still your ancestors--so, how do you count them when you decide your ethnicity???

        Hope this has not confused too much.
        Last edited by dentate; 12 September 2005, 03:55 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NANCY JONES
          Also... If your grandparents on one side were Italian and the otherside were English, let's say, would one sibling be more Italian and the other, more English? Very curious!
          I hope these are not dumb questions! This is the first time I have ever ran across this. Thanks again, Nan
          If you mean phenotype (your physical looks), what you say probably can be true. One sibling may have darker, mediterranean looks and look more italian, while the other sibling might have more northern european features. But it will still make you full siblings. Children will receive their genes from each parent randomly, so each sibling will have their own personal 'mix' of genes. This may result in different 'looks' for full-blooded siblings. Unless of course in the case of identical twins.

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