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How to find % composition of other Haplogroups in my DNA?

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  • How to find % composition of other Haplogroups in my DNA?

    I had my Y-chromosome analyzed and I know the Haplogroup that I belong to, thereby I am able to trace my paternal ancestry.

    How do I find out the other Haplogroups in my ancestry (since there would be ancestors other than my direct paternal line) and their percentage composition? is it possible?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Digging_DNA
    I had my Y-chromosome analyzed and I know the Haplogroup that I belong to, thereby I am able to trace my paternal ancestry.

    How do I find out the other Haplogroups in my ancestry (since there would be ancestors other than my direct paternal line) and their percentage composition? is it possible?
    The only way to do this is to find male cousins or uncles to take Y-DNA tests. Start with your mother's brothers or uncles. Check to see if there is a surnane project for their name. Contact them and ask them to test. Lots of luck.

    For Y-DNA there is no "percentage" involved. Your Y-DNA results are 100% your Y-DNA, not affected by any of your other ancestors.

    You can also test your mtDNA, your father's mtDNA, etc. Again, your mtDNA is 100% your mtDNA.

    You may be thinking of the DNAPrint test by AncestryByDNA which looks at autosomal DNA which is inherited from all your ancestors. Completely different subject.

    Bill Hurst

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    • #3
      What is autosomal DNA testing?

      Thanks for the info, but I am new to this subject.

      I am pretty sure that around 75% of my ancestors were of one ancestry (both male and female ancestors) and 25% were of a related but slightly different ancestry. I wanted some test done to formalize these % numbers.

      I know I can get the following tests done on my parents and my 2 surviving grandparents - My mtDNA, Father's mtDNA, Paternal Grandfather's mtDNA, Mother's Y, Maternal Grandmother's Y. But that makes it 5 more tests, $550 more, and painstaking. And how do I know if I got the entire picture even then since I am testing only some lineages.

      Isnt there a cheaper / simpler way of 1 single test performed on my DNA?

      What does the autosomal testing do? Will it help me achieve what I am loking for?

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      • #4
        AncestryByDNA

        Originally posted by Bill Hurst
        The only way to do this is to find male cousins or uncles to take Y-DNA tests. Start with your mother's brothers or uncles. Check to see if there is a surnane project for their name. Contact them and ask them to test. Lots of luck.

        For Y-DNA there is no "percentage" involved. Your Y-DNA results are 100% your Y-DNA, not affected by any of your other ancestors.

        You can also test your mtDNA, your father's mtDNA, etc. Again, your mtDNA is 100% your mtDNA.

        You may be thinking of the DNAPrint test by AncestryByDNA which looks at autosomal DNA which is inherited from all your ancestors. Completely different subject.

        Bill Hurst
        I checked AncestryByDNA. They say -"This service will predict your Indo-European heritage among the following groups:

        Northern European
        Southeastern European
        Middle Eastern
        South Asian
        "

        This is at a too high level. I am looking for something which will give me finer composition than this, at a Haplogroup level so that I can trace the ancestry of most of my ancestors.

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        • #5
          There are no tests to do what you are asking. Haplogroups tend to correlate with ethnicities, but are never a 100% predictor, especially because "ethnicity" implies a lot of different things. Your Y DNA comes from only one line of ancestry and is no more than 2% of your total genome. Also, these haplogroups are generally between 10,000 and over 80,000 years old, so that they originated long before any modern ethnicities other than the most general groupings. To find genes that would accurately differentiate between two closely related ethnicities is not possible at this time, and because of the way that autosomal DNA (everything that is not Y DNA or mtDNA) mixes itself up at every generation, getting a "percentage" of a particular ethnicity in your background will never be possible. Keep in mind that because of this process of DNA rearrangement, one can only state that while you definitely have 50% of your autosomal genes from one parent and 50% from the other, farther back than that one can only say that on *average* you have 25% of your autosomal genes from each grandparent. The actual percentage could in theory range from 0 to 50%. The farther back in time you go, the less certain it becomes what any ancestor contributed to your modern genome. Thus when you go back a few centuries, there will be people who are your ancestors--in the sense that you would not be here without them, you are their biological descendant--but from whom you have inherited not a single gene.

          This whole business of Y DNA and mtDNA is really most useful in statistical population studies. The frequency of different haplogroups within a population compared to their frequency in other populations suggest the relationships between those populations. For you as an individual, the most you will be able to say is that your Y DNA or mtDNA is of a type frequently found in such-and-such a population and rarely found in some other population, and that therefore you have some statistical likelihood that one particular line out of all the lines of your ancestors came from a population that frequently has that haplogroup. Getting such information from as many cousins as possible, and combining it with any paper trail you may have, is as close as you will get to what you are asking for.

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          • #6
            interesting..

            That was informative. But why cousins, I will try my parents and the surviving Grandparents for DNA analysis

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Digging_DNA
              That was informative. But why cousins, I will try my parents and the surviving Grandparents for DNA analysis
              Your father will have the exact same Y-chromosome pattern as you, as will your paternal grandfather. It would be a waste of money to do that.

              Your maternal grandfather's Y chromosome would provide a picture of your maternal deep ancestry.

              If your paternal grandmother has surviving brothers, or if any of those brothers had male children, you could test them for your father's maternal grandfather's Y chromosome which they would share.

              Similarly if your maternal grandmother has surviving brothers, or if any of those brothers had male children, you could test them for your mother's maternal grandfather's Y chromosome which they would share.

              Be careful about this and don't spend any more money until you understand more about how DNA is passed on and measured.

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              • #8
                mtDNA and Y..

                I guess I meant I will trace
                1) my father's maternal side from mtDNA from my father,
                2) my mother's paternal side from Y chromosome from my mother.
                3) my mother's maternal side from mtDNA from my own DNA
                4) I aready have my father's paternal side from my own DNA's Y chromosome

                National Georaphic's Genographic test doesn't allow the first 3 combinations, it tests Y for males and mtDNA for females, but Family Tree DNA allows these.

                However I need to check if they will charge me for only that, or will the vanilla tests (Y for male, mtDNA for female) also be mandatory.

                If there is a fault in this logic,please let me know

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                • #9
                  correction

                  Originally posted by Digging_DNA
                  I guess I meant I will trace
                  1) my father's maternal side from mtDNA from my father,
                  2) my mother's paternal side from Y chromosome from my mother.
                  3) my mother's maternal side from mtDNA from my own DNA
                  4) I aready have my father's paternal side from my own DNA's Y chromosome

                  National Georaphic's Genographic test doesn't allow the first 3 combinations, it tests Y for males and mtDNA for females, but Family Tree DNA allows these.

                  However I need to check if they will charge me for only that, or will the vanilla tests (Y for male, mtDNA for female) also be mandatory.

                  If there is a fault in this logic,please let me know
                  2) is the wrong approach inasmuch as your mother does not have a Y chromosome to test. You could test your mother's father, her brothers, or, any male descendants of theirs for this purpose.

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                  • #10
                    now I get it. thanks

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