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R1b haplogroup/random results questions

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  • R1b haplogroup/random results questions

    If you match a same surname person 24/25 markers and in the R1b haplogroup - does this mean the results may be random?

    People who have the R1b haplogroup, it is possible that two people who have no proven common ancestor can have matching DNA?
    Last edited by sissy; 26 August 2005, 11:24 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by sissy
    If you match a same surname person 24/25 markers and in the R1b haplogroup - does this mean the results may be random?

    People who have the R1b haplogroup, it is possible that two people who have no proven common ancestor can have matching DNA?

    any one can have different surnames and be close relatives reguardless of the hallogroup or type.reguardless of the nation of origin

    people didnt always do what paperwork says they did a polite way of saying infidelity exists,so did adopting you sisters kid when both parents died unexpectaly and having them take your name. some names like mine change every generation. in chelsea ma the dnn people had a meeting and decided denning would be the one name . even then some didnt abide by that. yet they still share ydna

    take a good look at your results as we get more people you will get more matches . maybe a pattern will emerge.i have some people who joined my project at the start and have no matches after 1.5 years. we need more people and even he will get a pattern and a sence of what happened as will you
    btw
    denning dennin dinnin dennen dinan denney dennehy dinning ect in chelsea are the same name

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    • #3
      Please let me clarify; we have the same Surname, we matched 24/25 Markers and my Haplogroup is R1b. The point of confusion is because our group Administrator stated "A word of caution--their haplogroup is R1b, the most common haplogroup. It is possible that the match is random."

      Seems like a 24/25 marker match with a person of the same surname is pretty significant to me. Perhaps our group Adminisitrator is off base in his statement?
      Last edited by sissy; 26 August 2005, 02:32 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sissy
        Please let me clarify; we have the same Surname, we matched 24/25 Markers and my Haplogroup is R1b. The point of confusion is because our group Administrator stated "A word of caution--their haplogroup is R1b, the most common haplogroup. It is possible that the match is random."

        Seems like a 24/25 marker match with a person of the same surname is pretty significant to me. Perhaps our group Adminisitrator is off base in his statement?
        Sissy,

        Yes, it is possible that the match is random, but the probability of this happening is extremely low. It is even possible that a 25/25 match between 2 people with the same surname is random. It's also possible I'll win the Powerball drawing tomorrow night.

        Nothing is certain in genealogy and DNA testing. The best we can do is compare our test results and calculate the probability we share a common ancestor. Using the conservative mutation rate of 0.002 per marker (1 mutatation in 500 generations) there is 50% chance that you share a common ancestor within the last 17 generations. There is a 95% chance that you share a common ancestor within 48 generations.

        A 24/25 match is highly significant. As a project administrator, I consider anyone who matches 24/25 (same surname) to be related sometime within in the time frame on surnames and very possibly within the past few hundred years. I also consider a 23/25 match a relationship though it is probably farther back in time.

        As for haplogroup R1b, it is the most common haplogroup and I would be wary of even 25/25 matches with other surnames because R1b is so common. But once you move within a surname I wouldn't be too concerned about the haplogroup.

        I think your group administrator is simply being overly cautious.

        John

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        • #5
          Thanks John I appreciate the help!

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          • #6
            Haplogroup R1b (ht-15) Variations & their Significance

            Is the variation in 390 from 24 to 23 an indicator of a significant subgrouping or is it just so much background noise ?


            DYS19/388/390/391/392/393

            14-12-24-11-13-13
            14-12-23-11-13-13

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            • #7
              Random Resuts

              Sissy, I agree with John. In the Meek Family project most folks have upgraded to 37 markers. The Meek family has more random mutation than average and 37 marker help us make connections that are not obvious with only 25 markers.

              Chris

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              • #8
                Thanks Chris.
                The 37 Marker might be beneficial. I will ask the other participant to consider
                upgrading from the 25 marker to the 37. I already have the 37 marker results.

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                • #9
                  R1b in Sicily

                  R1b in Sicily


                  If R1b is Celtic. Then how did R1b's find themselves in Sicily?

                  Are R1b's native to Sicily?

                  Or were they brought from Austria or the British Isles?

                  Or could the Normans have Celtic genes that left there mark in Sicily?



                  Two types of Normans - Celtic-Normans & Nordic-Normans


                  Two types of Sicilian Normans - Celtic-Normans & Nordic-Normans

                  I believe there are two types of Norman poplations in Sicily: R1a & R1b.

                  The question is whether R1b came from continetial European - from Spain or Austria or from the British Isles?

                  I am asking this question - due to having a name via my mother's father's side "Azzo" that means "noble" in Germanic.



                  Sicilian Peoples: The Normans


                  Here is interesting article written by Vincenzo Salerno:

                  http://www.bestofsicily.com/mag/art171.htm

                  Genetics & Anthropology in Sicily

                  http://www.bestofsicily.com/genetics.htm

                  I think r1b's could be result of - the influx of the "Celtic-Nordic" Normans intermarrying with the local population.

                  Nordic - most generally, refers to native inhabitants of Scandinavia, northwestern Europe and regions bordering the North Sea.

                  Normans - residual Norse civilization of medieval Normandy, amalgamated with the essentially Gallic-Celtic population already resident there. In the medieval context, the Normans were Frankish as well as Scandinavian.

                  R1a = Nordic
                  R1b = Celtic

                  There would have to be a few of us in Sicily

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