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GEDCOM should contain???

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  • GEDCOM should contain???

    I have a very large database (24,000 people) so I was going to upload direct line ancestors for my parents kits (I had them each tested; mt-DNA & Family Finder for mother, mt-DNA, Family Finder & Y-DNA37 for dad) and then I'm also planning to test my Uncle and my son. I think each "kit" needs to have a GEDCOM loaded but I want to know "just how much" to upload to be most useful to matches? When you upload a GEDCOM does that mean anyone can "grab" it and copy it or is it just "viewable" - I was only going to put the very basic birth, marriage, death info.

    And someone mentioned a surname list - is that here on FamilyTreeDNA or on another site?

    Thank you for helpful suggestions.

    Denise

  • #2
    I'm sure the FTDNA gedcoms only have direct ancestors, no siblings etc.

    Its up to you, but Full name, birth and death details eg the year and place are usually enough.
    I cant remember if the program hides living individuals or you choose to that yourself. (I hide living ancestors)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DSproed View Post
      I want to know "just how much" to upload to be most useful to matches? When you upload a GEDCOM does that mean anyone can "grab" it and copy it or is it just "viewable" - I was only going to put the very basic birth, marriage, death info.

      And someone mentioned a surname list - is that here on FamilyTreeDNA or on another site?
      The GEDCOM data viewable by yourself and your matches is for each ancestor:
      Name
      DOB + Place
      DOD + Place

      Any other information appears to be ignored, currently.

      When exporting to GEDCOM I have my genealogy software filter out contemporary information prior to upload and then on the FTDNA upload choose to make all info visible. That way I do not have to trust FTDNA to handle contemporary data.

      Your matches can also see a list of your surnames, that list is created from your uploaded GEDCOM.

      I consider the browsing of the uploaded GEDCOM data to be a _very_ inefficient process. So I never browse the trees of my matches. Instead I rely on the much more efficient automatic GEDCOM-matching, such as that performed by gedmatch.com - and my own site, see link below.

      I still upload my GEDCOM to FTDNA, not so much because I don't mind that others waste their time browsing my data, but just to show that I have data.

      Whenever someone contacts me, I immediately suggest that they upload their data (DNA + GEDCOM) to gedmatch.com and for the GEDCOM also my own site.

      I have information on 3000 persons in my GEDCOM, only a small fraction of that is visible via FTDNA. And the chance that someone with a DNA-match will actually realise that there is a GEDCOM-match is small, that type of task can be done much more reliably by a computer.

      That point of view is naturally even more valid for a database of 24.000 persons.

      Back in 2004 the New York Times ran a story about my GEDCOM comparison service - because it is based on the volunteer effort so commonly seen in genealogy.

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      • #4
        A Common Ancestor is a Grandparent and Gedcom only need to be a tree of Grandparents. Uncles, Aunts, and Cousin while they do share DNA with you they don't pass in on to you so they want be a Common Ancestor. Also helpful is Name and place of Birth and death like mention in the post before.

        When I see a tree with just names and no dates and location I don't wast my time. I put effort into my Gedcom and when you see just a name its really no help and frustrating. The reason why is you have the same surname but its not the same person its just another name. If you put the names date and location you might be able to piece things together.

        Example: Both matches share a surname and have traced their lines back to Clarke County around the same time 1830 but don't know who the parents for both earliest know ancestor is. But the name dates and location has made in possible to research those who lived in Clarke County during this time frame and a search of who the parents might be is possible.
        Last edited by EdwardRHill; 16th November 2012, 11:53 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Lklundin View Post
          The GEDCOM data viewable by yourself and your matches is for each ancestor:
          Name
          DOB + Place
          DOD + Place

          Any other information appears to be ignored, currently.
          In addition to the above, information regarding any ancestor 12 or more generations back is also (silently) ignored. FTDNA has informed me that this is a deliberate restriction.

          They could have chosen to make all generations in the purely maternal and paternal lines viewable (at least when the relevant tests have been taken), but they have not.

          Also, their GEDCOM-import does not support the ANSEL character set, so try to export your data using a different character set.

          I am actually happy that FTDNA put their efforts in the area of sequencing and not in trivial GEDCOM-matters that others already handle better.

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          • #6
            Gedcom uploaded

            Thanks for the suggestions. I have uploaded 4 GEDCOM's to match the ancestry of the 4 kit clients. It appears to have been successful. I also included a "note" in the profile that includes my larger online database which I update every couple days with whatever progress I make. Some researchers might find that easier to see once they have a hint of a match.

            I'm hoping for matches to appear with results soon altho my father (being 100% German ancestry) is skeptical of the value of my testing him

            Appreciate the feedback!
            Denise in Oregon

            Comment


            • #7
              I see there has been changes recently to how gedcoms work on FTDNA. I'm going to upload a gedcom but like the 1st poster in this thread, I'm wondering just how many of my 9000 odd people in my database I should load.
              1. me & my direct ancestors only
              2. me my ancestors and their children
              3. me my ancestors and their children and the children's children

              What have others found works best?

              Regards, Graham

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              • #8
                I only uploaded direct ancestors, but I have since wondered whether I should have included collaterals so that their surnames would show and help indicate possible connections to people. However, given the way gedcom works on FTDNA, it's hard to see much of the pedigree at one time.

                While I want FTDNA to focus its attention on the DNA rather than on the gedcoms, I'm not all that pleased with the ease-of-use on the gedcoms. I want to be able to at least say which line I suspect the connection to be from and avoid the "hey these kits match, any idea why" approach.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by khuebner View Post
                  I only uploaded direct ancestors, but I have since wondered whether I should have included collaterals so that their surnames would show and help indicate possible connections to people. However, given the way gedcom works on FTDNA, it's hard to see much of the pedigree at one time.

                  While I want FTDNA to focus its attention on the DNA rather than on the gedcoms, I'm not all that pleased with the ease-of-use on the gedcoms. I want to be able to at least say which line I suspect the connection to be from and avoid the "hey these kits match, any idea why" approach.
                  After you upload your GEDcom file, you are then requested to select the individual in the file who DNA was tested. What is your problem with GEDcom files?

                  That said, I do agree that the FT-DNA family tree layout sucks. The pedigree format employed by AncestryDNA is immeasurably better.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I didn't have any problem following the directions. I just find it a real pain to navigate around the pedigrees (first they have to be set to 9 generations, then I have to check for further data if someone looks potentially interesting). And with only the ancestral names in there rather than collateral as well, it's very easy to miss seeing a name that might be recognizable. It's useless looking at Scandinavian patronymics, but I do know some of the surnames of distant cousins.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by khuebner View Post
                      it's very easy to miss seeing a name that might be recognizable. It's useless looking at Scandinavian patronymics, but I do know some of the surnames of distant cousins.
                      Yes, manually looking for overlaps between GEDCOMs is process that is inefficient to the point of being a waste of time.

                      An automated search, such as that for Scandinavians mentioned below, is better by far.

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