Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

recommended tests?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • recommended tests?

    I have a friend who is looking for advice on what tests to have his 80-year old aunt take. He would also like to take himself any of the same tests that are appropriate for males, as well as tests that are for males only. While I wouldn't say money is no object, the resources are available for any reasonable testing. I think the point is just to tie down as much ancestry as is possible, rather than looking for a missing link. Let's consider all vendors.

    I'm having trouble with the pro's and cons's of the AncestryDNA versus Family Finder. Since the approaches are a bit different and it's not clear who will end up with the biggest database, would ordering both not be unreasonable. What about Geno 2.0?

    I appreciate any help with this. Though I think I'm progressing past the novice stage, I'm uncomfortable with saying to him that you need to do this, this, and this.

  • #2
    Given the parameters of what she is looking for I think the Geno 2 test might be the best bet. It wins on the cost factor, gives population finder results and mtDNA for her. The disadvantage is no ability to find matches or to download raw data.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't think you posted what you expect out of the tests.

      For medical info: 23andme is the ONLY choice

      For recent cousin matches: Family Finder, 23andme and Ancestry. Note: long term Ancestry will probably have the largest database but now is the smallest. 23andme currently has the largest database and FTDA tends to have the highest percentage of matches actually interested in discussion with others.

      For broad general test: Gen 2.0 is probably be the best with 23andme a close second.

      For YDNA and mtDNA: FTDNA is the ONLY option. All other companies are a waste of time and money.

      For third party ancestry (Genmatch/Eurogenes/Dodecad) . 23andme is preferred , but Family Finder will work.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
        I think the point is just to tie down as much ancestry as is possible, rather than looking for a missing link. Let's consider all vendors.
        Recent or older?

        The autosomal tests (like Family Finder) that give you (roughly) the chance to match people who are related at a point up to about 6 generations back. They're mostly about the last couple of hundred years.

        Y-chromosome (male only) and mtDNA tests (the female line, but males can take it) can be useful for genealogy if you're lucky, but if they turn out to be from a common group then its a bit of "you are related to all Europe, hooray" and not useful for connecting to people. It can be fascinating for intellectual curiosity tho.

        The geno2.0 test is oriented around trying to figure out which population sources your DNA might have come from - the aim is less about genealogy, and more about looking at your deeper ancestry.

        If It Were Me, I'd prob suggest FamilyFinder (or similar) and the Geno2.0 test to see what comes up. They can always expand it out further later.

        Comment


        • #5
          Whatever they decide they should elect for the family elder a company that stores her unused sample for the future.

          The advantage of 23&Me and Geno2.0 is that both sample both Y and mtDNA to arrive at 'pretty good' haplogroup assignments. The sampling of Y and mtDNA by Geno2.0 is much more thoroughgoing than 23&Me but no sampling can replace the complete sequencing of the entire mtDNA genome available only from FTDNA. Geno2.0's sampling of Y SNP's is far ahead of FTDNA's comparable Deep Clade test and is expected to replace it.

          If Geno2.0 has the same degree of success as Geno1.0, that enrolled more than half a million participants from all over the world, they will eventually have the biggest database of all providers. They also promise some sort of matching and contact capability in the future, but neither their test nor their website are optimized for that the way the others are. At the same time, 23&Me has disappointed many users interested in identifying relatives as most 23&Me users are more concerned with health and privacy than making contact. So, if you don't care about health and are not too concerned about identifying relatives, I would rate Geno2.0 ahead of 23&Me as an 'all-in-one' test.

          Like FTDNA, Ancestry offers other tests for Y and mtDNA but neither compares with FTDNA. Both FTDNA and Ancestry are specifically set-up to identify relatives and facilitate contact. Ancestry has a large user base and if they are able to convince most of them to add DNA testing to their search capability they will surpass FTDNA in database size. The downside to Ancestry is it is a subscription service.

          I suggest the aunt do either Geno2.0 or chose between FTDNA and Ancestry, and the nephew take the test the aunt doesn't take. If other family members are interested they might select one from the two not chosen or double-down on a selected platform.
          Last edited by tomcat; 28 October 2012, 10:23 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi everyone, thanks for the advice. Like I said, I'm trying to help a friend and I'm not completely sure what his objectives are except to get as much ancestry as possible nailed down while his aunt is still living.

            My biases lean toward FTDNA, but for myself, I have only been doing Y-chromosome STR and SNP testing. I'm not that familiar with the mtDNA and autosomal products. Would you say that FTDNA is the only company that is storing samples and offering a wide catalog of tests? My thoughts are that he should go with the Family Finder and the lowest level of mtDNA testing for the aunt and the same for himself along with at least a 37-marker Y-DNA test. The mtDNA and Y-DNA tests can always be upgraded with the samples on hand if he sees a need.

            In the scheme of things, AncestryDNA tests or even Geno 2.0 are not really that expensive. Is it worthwhile to go ahead and order one or both besides the battery of the FTDNA tests?

            Once again, I appreciate the help. While I was composing this reply, I see tomcat had a post that answers some of my questions. I appreciate the input there, but I'm going ahead and post what I've already written.

            Comment


            • #7
              Any direct maternal line descendant of the aunt will, most likely, have exactly the same mtDNA as the aunt. So, if there is another direct maternal line descendant available, testing the aunt for mtDNA is not urgent.

              It is important that her DNA sample be preserved because it cannot be recovered if lost.

              If the nephew is the son of a woman who is the sister to the aunt, he is a direct maternal line descendant, he will have the same mtDNA as the aunt. As such, he would be the best candidate for Geno2.0 that would give the family the best available read on the mtDNA and the paternal (to the nephew) Y.

              Their best shot at identifying autosomal relatives is either Ancestry or FTDNA FamilyFinder, and if the nephew and aunt have a direct maternal line relationship, the aunt would be the candidate for Ancestry or FTDNA. Ancestry is, most likely, the better bet but there is a subscription cost for Ancestry.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tomcat View Post
                Any direct maternal line descendant of the aunt will, most likely, have exactly the same mtDNA as the aunt. So, if there is another direct maternal line descendant available, testing the aunt for mtDNA is not urgent.....
                Thanks, tomcat, for the additional advice..

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
                  I have a friend who is looking for advice on what tests to have his 80-year old aunt take. He would also like to take himself any of the same tests that are appropriate for males, as well as tests that are for males only. While I wouldn't say money is no object, the resources are available for any reasonable testing. I think the point is just to tie down as much ancestry as is possible, rather than looking for a missing link. Let's consider all vendors.

                  I'm having trouble with the pro's and cons's of the AncestryDNA versus Family Finder. Since the approaches are a bit different and it's not clear who will end up with the biggest database, would ordering both not be unreasonable. What about Geno 2.0?

                  I appreciate any help with this. Though I think I'm progressing past the novice stage, I'm uncomfortable with saying to him that you need to do this, this, and this.
                  My recommendation is that your friend stick to the Family Finder test for now. Through matches (distant cousins) a picture will evolve showing related families and places of origin. Still, whoever does this must be patient and take in the broad picture that evolves over a year or two of matches, and not rely on the initial list of cousins. Do I like the Population Finder associated with Family Finder? No, I think it is not reliable at all, but they tell me a new version will be out within a few months that is more accurate. Forum users on here seem to recommend using the tools on GEDmatch, once we've tested with FTDNA or 23 and Me -- and I am happy that I took their advice. Communication with my Family Finder cousins and use of GEDmatch tools has been very rewarding and has enriched my experience in genealogy.

                  Having said all of that, I plan on testing with 23 and Me within a few months, for the emphasis on health-related issues. Also, I like its version of overall ancestry much better too.

                  My elderly parents tested with Family Finder after me. My guesses at which of my own matches were related to my respected parents (or grandparents) were correct most of the time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mixedkid View Post
                    Having said all of that, I plan on testing with 23 and Me within a few months, for the emphasis on health-related issues. Also, I like its version of overall ancestry much better too.
                    23&Me is testing a new version of Ancestry Painting, their ancestry admixture estimation tool, that "promises to be" a big advance for them and more nuanced than FTDNA's Population Finder. Can't say how it compares to AncestryDNA although there have been complaints that AncestryDNA overestimates Scandinavian ancestry.

                    All providers (FTDNA, 23&Me, AncestryDNA, Geno2.0) offer data downloads that will allow aftermarket analysis (Dienekes, Eurogenes, GedMatch, DNATribes, etc.). I haven't read if/how/when these aftermarket analyses will respond to the newest offerings, AncestryDNA and Geno2.0.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X