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  • Great Great Grandfather question.

    My Father researched our family tree many many years ago and he done his best to make sure the information he gave us kids was accurate. But even though he done his best that still does not mean the Family tree names and places and dates are accurate. I even have a picture of one of my ancestors. My Great Great Grandfather. My grandfather's grandfather. Supposedly we know his name and birthplace and I even know where he is buried. How can I be sure that is him ? How can I be sure this person in this picture is MY ancestor ? In other words, I have taken the YDNA 37 marker test and I have lots of matches but I have learned that this is only comparing me with people who I may possibly share a common ancestor with from 10 or 20 generations back. And even then, the ones that match me on 37 of 37 markers are even more unsure of their family tree than I am of mine. There is so much uncertainty with it all that it discourages me sometimes. The way our project coordinator explains it is that if we match people on this ydna test then we share a common ancestor with them. That is nice but I would like to know for sure where these ancestors came from. For certain. Anyone can guess. I had guesses before I took the test. If the matches I match have the same flawed information and records that I have then were both blind and leading each other down into the ditch. If that makes any sense. There are so many different tests you can take that it is confusing which tests tell you what. What test can i take that would tell me about all lines of my family tree and where those people came from? What countrys they came from ? I took the YDNA test and it tells me a Haplogroup but its only a "predicted" haplogroup.

  • #2
    Ok, I been reading , what does ETHNIC PERCENTAGES mean and will it be accurate or more guesswork ? The family Finder says it gives this.

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    • #3
      ethnic percentages ...... I am fairly certain I am white. I dont need confirmation on that. I am caucasion. I mean Irish, english, German, polish, Russian ????????? etc. Does that make sense ?

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      • #4
        I copied this straight from this website. Looks like I have my ancestor.

        Population Finder Percentage Test
        The Population Finder program determines your biogeographical ancestry — the story of your personal genetic history — by comparing your autosomal DNA to that of our world DNA population database. Population Finder results consist of up to four out of seven continental groups (Africa, America, East Asia, Europe, Middle Eastern, Oceania, and South Asia). For each, the percentage of your genome that matches is shown.


        "Europe" LOL ! really ? Ya think ? That is way way less specific than i had hoped for. The bathroom mirror tells me Europe !

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        • #5
          Post back here when your Population Finder results are in and you are wondering what "Mozabite" means.

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          • #6
            Hi 507 -- I'm brand new to the DNA matters myself and also to this forum, so I can't be a lot of help on your ancestry questions in regard to the specifics of the DNA.

            But I can maybe be of some help on your initial question as to how can you be certain that a photo of your GG Grandfather is truly who you think he is. It depends first on how your father went about the family tree research that he did. One of my Aunts and my maternal Grandmother did the first research on that side of my family. My Grandmother knew of course who her parents were, what their names were. Starting with those, and the names of the related aunts and uncles, she and my Aunt were able to get copies of birth certificates and marriage records. This can be done for anyone in your family whom you are sure about -- in some cases, church records have these, or the county or state may have them. Parental names that also appear on these records will take you another generation back. Some families have kept family Bibles and recorded information there.

            You can also rely fairly well on the memories of the older people in your family. My Mother well remembers her elderly relatives -- she may not be so certain about dates of birth and what-not, but those important details can be found in records.

            Online websites such as Ancestry.com can be very helpful because if you know where your family members were living in the past, you can with a little bit of time find them on census records which will assist in getting a good or fair idea of birth years, family member names and usually the occupation of the head of household (generally the father).

            As to the broader DNA matters, I don't yet know myself really how specific the results can be. It's interesting to me that although I know I'm of generally European descent, my long ago ancestors came there from other parts of the world and that my family DNA can tell me about other ethnic groups that tie in to my own ancestry. From what I've been reading, some people or groups can end up being pretty sure what part of what country they come from, and I'm of course especially interested in finding that out, but the larger picture is also pretty intriguing.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Javelin View Post
              Post back here when your Population Finder results are in and you are wondering what "Mozabite" means.


              If that was the answer then that would be fantastic because at least thats an honest answer. But whats listed is simply 7 very, very, vague choices. And by vague, like I said, "europe". This is laughable. So they lump German, Irish, English, and french all in the same catagory ? Thats my point.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BarbP View Post
                Hi 507 -- I'm brand new to the DNA matters myself and also to this forum, so I can't be a lot of help on your ancestry questions in regard to the specifics of the DNA.

                But I can maybe be of some help on your initial question as to how can you be certain that a photo of your GG Grandfather is truly who you think he is. It depends first on how your father went about the family tree research that he did. One of my Aunts and my maternal Grandmother did the first research on that side of my family. My Grandmother knew of course who her parents were, what their names were. Starting with those, and the names of the related aunts and uncles, she and my Aunt were able to get copies of birth certificates and marriage records. This can be done for anyone in your family whom you are sure about -- in some cases, church records have these, or the county or state may have them. Parental names that also appear on these records will take you another generation back. Some families have kept family Bibles and recorded information there.

                You can also rely fairly well on the memories of the older people in your family. My Mother well remembers her elderly relatives -- she may not be so certain about dates of birth and what-not, but those important details can be found in records.

                Online websites such as Ancestry.com can be very helpful because if you know where your family members were living in the past, you can with a little bit of time find them on census records which will assist in getting a good or fair idea of birth years, family member names and usually the occupation of the head of household (generally the father).

                As to the broader DNA matters, I don't yet know myself really how specific the results can be. It's interesting to me that although I know I'm of generally European descent, my long ago ancestors came there from other parts of the world and that my family DNA can tell me about other ethnic groups that tie in to my own ancestry. From what I've been reading, some people or groups can end up being pretty sure what part of what country they come from, and I'm of course especially interested in finding that out, but the larger picture is also pretty intriguing.
                My Dad used census records and death certificates and marriage certificates and things like that. I don't know about Ancestry.com. I tried that and one of my supposed relatives had someone on their family tree that was born before her own mother was. I couldn't hardly believe ancestry.com didn't flag it or even block her from listing that. That is really my whole point with Geneaology. There is so much wrong information floating around out there that its almost impossible to really rely on anything and trust it.

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                • #9
                  I dont think any DNA test of any kind can tell you exactly who your ancestor was.
                  DNA is a tool to help you and be used in conjunction with traditional genealogy.
                  It can help eliminate or confirm your paper trails. etc....
                  As for "is the person in a photo the person you think it is", maybe you need to get someone else in the family with a very good trail back to this person and see if they have photos aswell, that may help confirm your photo.
                  Why do think it may not be him? Does it have anything on the back of the phot or in the photo itself to help you date it or place it in a certain region etc...

                  If your so uncertain, you should start the paper trail agial and do it all yourself.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 507 View Post
                    My Dad used census records and death certificates and marriage certificates and things like that. I don't know about Ancestry.com. I tried that and one of my supposed relatives had someone on their family tree that was born before her own mother was. I couldn't hardly believe ancestry.com didn't flag it or even block her from listing that. That is really my whole point with Geneaology. There is so much wrong information floating around out there that its almost impossible to really rely on anything and trust it.
                    I agree that one has to be careful about the information on Ancestry.com and be watchful about dates that don't match up (as in your example), locations that seem off base (most of one's relatives are in Rhode Island but here's one in Nevada for some reason), things like that. But it's a very good source for the census records as long as one can begin with certain knowledge of where grand- or great-grandparents were living at such and such a time. Other records there are useful to either establish additional information or to present possibilities to be followed up on.

                    Another good place is Genforum, where one can post questions and hopefully get in contact with others researching the same family lines.

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                    • #11
                      507

                      It sounds like your father has already started much of the leg work, pick up on that work and expand on his work, that is why he worked all those hours on the family tree, to pass it on to you. He already showed you how it is supposed to be done by researching the birth, marriage, death records, census records and other various records, follow in those foot steps and expand on his work.

                      Those Y DNA matches of your surname you have, may start to fall in to place because you will have been able to figure out exactly who the common male ancestor is by obtaining copies of the paper records.
                      And I would highly suggest you upgrade to the 67 marker level one day in the future. 37 markers is good, 67 is best.

                      The answers you seek are in the paper records, you just have to go out and do the leg work just like your father and continue on with his work and expand on it.

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                      • #12
                        I think in many ways , when going back a number of generations, it is impossible to know with 100% certainty who your ancestors were. My mother who has DNA tested is 95. She remembers her father and grandfather and knows their stories. There are at least 10 family trees on ancestry.com who have this grandfather wrong ( his parents and place of birth).
                        To make it worse the old ( 1848) French documents are also wrong. Apparently it was hard for the author to understand how a father and son could have a different surname so they gave the father the same surname as the son. In fact this son was adopted , unknown to the authors. My point is without my mothers oral tradition both the written documention and family trees would go unchallenged.
                        In my case I have a standing offer to pay for DNA testing for anyone with my surname and claiming the same Y decent as I.
                        There were 6 unrelated settler's in early Quebec with my surname. I am reasonably sure of which one. However to be 100% sure would require DNA testing

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