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  • Subclade testing

    My DNA results confirm I am related to an emigrant from England in the 1600's. What will a subclade test prove for me?

  • #2
    The short answer is no . For the most part a haplogroup or subclade cannot be assigned to any particular country. There are some exceptions like native American but for the most part they cannot.
    For example I am L21 , around 50% of Irish males are L21 and around 80% of the UK belong to that subclade . However I am of French heritage as this subclade can also be found in parts of France, Spain and Germany.

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    • #3
      Sorry I misread your question. However, even still , a subclade of say L21 would make sense or add more evidence but would not "prove" it.

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      • #4
        Subclades

        I should have stated what it will reveal for me, instead of what it will prove.
        And what is a subclade.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jlawrence View Post
          I should have stated what it will reveal for me, instead of what it will prove.
          And what is a subclade.
          To make it easier for helpful people to help you, you could also state what you mean by

          Originally posted by jlawrence View Post
          My DNA results
          Y-DNA, mtDNA, autosomal DNA ?

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          • #6
            To make it easier for helpful people to help you, you could also state what you mean by DNA results
            I assumed the OP was asking if a deep clade test would offer proof or
            reveal to him more information about this ancestor. However, you are correct , he would need to clarify.

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            • #7
              Just received test results

              Finally received mtDNA full sequence results and I'm x2b. I see it's mostly considered European. I uploaded the results to the mtDNAcommunity.org and I have a 1 step match, a 2 step match and a 4 step match. Ok, someone tell me what that means time wise, forgive me if you've gone through this but I forget where I read some of this stuff in the forum. I read that this full sequence test is the ultimate test. I am strictly interested in my direct maternal line so that's why I took it in the first place, it was advertised as the ONLY test I'd need to take. But now I'm wondering about that. I have a brick wall and can't get out of N.J. all the way back to 1774. Is there a book I can buy like "DNA and Genetics for dummies?" I sure need it.

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              • #8
                Regarding ^ post, I would look at the local history of New Jersey, as well as traditional genealogical sources/websites. !774 is rather late in New Jersey history; i.e English/Quaker, Dutch, Swedish/Finnish, etc. I have a few roots there myself. By that date, my ancestors there had already moved on to new geographical locations, such as Virginia and the Carolinas. After the Revolutionary War, people then moved westward, instead of southward, as the western frontier opened up. X2b could be Scottish, among other possibilities; and may have come via early Norse (just guessing).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                  Regarding ^ post, I would look at the local history of New Jersey, as well as traditional genealogical sources/websites. !774 is rather late in New Jersey history; i.e English/Quaker, Dutch, Swedish/Finnish, etc. I have a few roots there myself. By that date, my ancestors there had already moved on to new geographical locations, such as Virginia and the Carolinas. After the Revolutionary War, people then moved westward, instead of southward, as the western frontier opened up. X2b could be Scottish, among other possibilities; and may have come via early Norse (just guessing).
                  The research has been exhausted in this line, as many have given up on this research since the 1930's. I have been told that professional genealogists could not find the information and talked to historical librarians from N.J. who said the research i'm looking for has never been found. it's a true mystery. The surname is quite common, Adams, and there were many by that surname in that area at the time not all necessairly related. Will never give up looking!

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                  • #10
                    Is there a book I can buy like "DNA and Genetics for dummies?" I sure need it.
                    Have you tried the ebook on the main FTDNA web page? It is titled Interpreting Your Results
                    It does have other links for understanding mtDNA

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                    • #11
                      Yes, been reading that e-book this morning and it's interesting. That I can understand, it's just when people quote certain segments and SNP'S is where I get all confused. I do have 3 matches to the full sequence when I uploaded to the mtDna Community. A one step match which I read should be in the 16 generation time frame or so, and a 2 step match and a 4 step match. Then 8 matches are listed on FTNDA for my full sequence, but don't know what "steps" away they are and wouldn't know how to calculate it. At least I have people to email to ask questions.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jlawrence View Post
                        My DNA results confirm I am related to an emigrant from England in the 1600's. What will a subclade test prove for me?
                        The Y Deep Clade test offered by FTDNA is obsoleted by the NatGeo 2.0 extensive sampling of Y SNP's, so if you wanted to do Y-SNP's the 2.0 is the way to go until FTDNA refines their Y-SNP offering.

                        Doing any Y-SNP testing will not add to your understanding of your relation to your English ancestor that, I assume, was determined by a Y STR test.

                        Your Y SNP test would add to the public understanding of Y phylogeny and the deeper ancestry of your Y haplogroup and place you, with greater certainty, on the proper twig of the Y tree. If you and your Y STR match both test for Y SNP's and find you share a rare Y SNP, you may be able to make a connection with others in your Y lineage if their results include that rarity.

                        However, that matching capability is only an imagined future feature of NatGeo 2.0.

                        Hope this helps.

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