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I2b1 - No matches in 3+ years

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  • I2b1 - No matches in 3+ years

    Hi folks,

    A group of us need help. We all have the same (more or less) surname, and are all I2b1, and none of us is getting any matches. Beyond my original 3 matches when I first signed up about 3 years ago, I haven't gotten one single match. (And the matches I did get all ignored my emails.)

    Can anybody tale a look at the bottom 5 entries on this family surname chart and advise us which steps should be taken next?

    http://www.familytreedna.com/public/...ction=yresults

    Is there another group we can join that might direct us on which tests need to be taken next? Or how we should proceed?

    I just joined "I2*, new ISOGG I2b and I2c Haplogroup Project", but I am listed as "ungrouped", so I'm not sure it's going to help any, but I'm emailing the group administrator to see if he has any ideas, but I thought I'd ask here, too.

    I don't know that we care whether the 5 of us care if we are related to each other, or how close, as none of us has a paper trail to fall back on, but I think we all would like to know where we came from in the Old World.

    Thanks,
    Lime

  • #2
    I am assuming your talking about Y matches? I haven't had a match yet in over one and half years despite being a very common Haplogroup (L21). So not having Y matches is probably more common than people think. Likely this is due to the fact few Continental Europeans have tested. My family is from France via Quebec.
    I am not an expert but it seems to me that the best strategy would be to turn toward autosomal testing and finding cousins.

    Comment


    • #3
      Having matches really depends on your Haplogroups. For example my MTDNA Haplogroup is I5a which is found in less than 3% of the worlds Population. I think if you have a common Haplogroup and still don't have matches, it has to do with who is testing. Your best bet is to get FamilyFinder as it has been suggested. Better shot with FF to get matches.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Lime View Post
        Hi folks,

        A group of us need help. We all have the same (more or less) surname, and are all I2b1, and none of us is getting any matches. Beyond my original 3 matches when I first signed up about 3 years ago, I haven't gotten one single match. (And the matches I did get all ignored my emails.)

        Can anybody tale a look at the bottom 5 entries on this family surname chart and advise us which steps should be taken next?

        http://www.familytreedna.com/public/...ction=yresults

        Is there another group we can join that might direct us on which tests need to be taken next? Or how we should proceed?
        Maybe join the Germany Y DNA project, too:

        https://my.familytreedna.com/group-j...p=Germany-YDNA

        I just joined "I2*, new ISOGG I2b and I2c Haplogroup Project", but I am listed as "ungrouped", so I'm not sure it's going to help any, but I'm emailing the group administrator to see if he has any ideas, but I thought I'd ask here, too.
        I haven't looked at the I2 project's data, but perhaps you are ungrouped for the time being until the project administrator gets around to grouping you.

        I don't know that we care whether the 5 of us care if we are related to each other, or how close, as none of us has a paper trail to fall back on, but I think we all would like to know where we came from in the Old World.
        Deep ancestry is usually associated with SNP testing rather than STR testing. Unfortunately, the I2 tree is rather sparse compared to say R1b:

        http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpI.html

        ... but if there's a discussion group or forum associated with the I2 project then I'd suggest joining that, too, in order to receive advice on a strategy for SNP testing.

        Comment


        • #5
          As a PS to the above, have you also looked for matches on other databases? For instance:

          www.ysearch.org

          ... Sorensen:

          http://www.smgf.org/pages/sorensondatabase.jspx

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gtc View Post
            ..

            Deep ancestry is usually associated with SNP testing rather than STR testing. Unfortunately, the I2 tree is rather sparse compared to say R1b:

            http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpI.html

            ... but if there's a discussion group or forum associated with the I2 project then I'd suggest joining that, too, in order to receive advice on a strategy for SNP testing.
            Your five could do the NatGeo Genographic 2.0 that samples Y SNP's more extensively than any other test as well as Mt and autosomal SNP's. The focus of 2.0 is deep ancestry rather than genealogy. Be part of the discovery process for I !

            Comment


            • #7
              this website says My "predicted haplogroup" is I2b1. The project coordinator says i belong in the project but there are many many last names in our project. Some have the same last name as me. Some don't. I have a whole page full of alleged "matches". If you would like details about my paper trail tree or my last name or my matches you can send me a private message. Who knows, you and i could be cousins. GOD help your soul . lol

              Comment


              • #8
                Oh, my gosh, I thought I had fixed my settings here. I don't get email notice that my queries have been answers! So sorry.

                I joined this group, but never heard back from anybody - it appears to be totally dead.
                I2*, ISOGG new I2b,

                So I joined this group and it is the answer, for me, anyway.
                I-M223 Y-Haplogroup Project FTDNA group: http://www.familytreedna.com/public/M223-Y-Clan/
                [/B]

                After joining, I contacted the administrator and ask him what to do next. He fit me in the page where i belong, and then told me the logical thing to do, or test to buy, or whatever. In my case, it was to join a Yahoo group, buy a SNP and watch what was going on. When the results come back, from all of us, not just me, there will probably be more subdivisions.

                On the family finder, I'm not sure I understand it, but I don't want to find any family. I want to find people who were family 100s or a 1000 years ago, or 2000 years ago. Or what tribe we were in the Bronze Age.

                Thanks for your help, though,

                Suzy

                Comment


                • #9
                  FamilyFinder offers your best bet. It tests autosomal DNA and will give you names of distant cousins and their ancestral names (and sometimes ancestral homes are included, either with the ancestral names or the gedcom). You may recognize ancestral names and begin to separate out those new cousins who belong to your father's or your mother's side of the family.

                  Truthfully, I can't imagine depending on either a Y DNA or mitochondrial DNA test soley to either find ancestors, living relatives or any hint of ones ethinic background. As an example: My Y DNA haplogroup is Middle Eastern. That only tells me about my direct paternal line. It tells me nothing about my other ancestors including my other male ancestors not included in that direct paternal line. The PopulationFinder component of FamilyFinder is far from perfect, but that does give you some idea of what your ethnic background might be. Most of us on here take our raw data and have it analyzed elsewhere and seem to be more satisfied with the ethnicities that come up, yet that raw data of the autosomal DNA we use comes from the FamilyFinder test.

                  Look at the "broad picture" you get from FamilyFinder first. You will get many more hints about your family background from that test than either the Y DNA test or the mitochondrial test. Concentrating on Y DNA alone, without comparing findings from an autosomal DNA test is pretty much like attempting to find a needle in a haystack.
                  Last edited by mixedkid; 11 September 2012, 12:21 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks, Mixed,

                    Would that advice still apply if one knew the pedigree of the female line back to the 12th century? And the general pedigree before that? My husband (it's his DNA we're talking about) is Low Dutch, and his ancestors were in New Amsterdam almost as soon as it colonized. In his mother's line, they only married other low Dutch until she married in 1945 to this outsider.

                    From what I understand, there are family pedigrees, of almost every family feeding into his maternal line, going back in time more than a few centuries before then.

                    It's only the paternal line he has no idea about.

                    I was thinking I wanted to pull that y part out of the mix and concentrate only on the paternal line...not true?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Looking at only the Y chromosome will only tell you about his direct paternal line -- and only about the DNA on the Y chromosome. It will tell you nothing about all of the autosomal DNA contributed by many generations of other males (or females) in his family. In fact, it will tell you nothing about the autosomal DNA contributed by males in his direct paternal line.

                      Y DNA analysis points towards a specific male line as far as paternity goes. It also gives an indication about the ancient origin of a specific male line. It can hint at ethnicity of that specific male line as well. But as far as genealogy goes, that's about it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Try This?

                        I too am I2b1 and have very few y-DNA matches. I belong to the East Anglia project and find it, at, least interesting. Typically, you have to be able to trace an ancestor back to that region to join, but you might ask the administrator for an exemption. Just a thought.

                        Jim

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