Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Does surname in Y-DNA 67 matches indicate father's surname

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Does surname in Y-DNA 67 matches indicate father's surname

    Hello,
    New to this forum and genetic genealogy but not traditional research. I am helping a friend find his biological father. His Y-DNA 67 test came back with 3 matches, all with the same surname. Apologies if the answer to this is obvious but need to ask! Does this indicate that there is a likelihood that this surname is the biological father's surname.
    Thank you all for your help.
    Carol

  • #2
    There is a likelihood, but not certainty. Sometimes the close matches turn out all to have the same surname (or a spelling variant), at other times they bear many different surnames (suggesting that the STR signature predates the era when stable surnames became fashionable). "Likelihood" is a very apt word for this situation. With only 3 matches, the sample size is still very small. The Y DNA evidence gives you clues, and perhaps a direction for further research, but not proof.

    Comment


    • #3
      What is the genetic distance of the matches?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
        What is the genetic distance of the matches?
        Yes, the surname of the matches may indicate the name of the paternal line.

        It most often does, so the paper trail should be examined, and the autosomal test should be taken by your friend.


        Let me share with you an example of my uncle, to indicate that it is not always straightforward. His 54 matches at 67 markers are most likely from other branches, and the separation happened more than 1600 years ago. At least Big Y tells us that for those who took that test (and we extend that to those who share their last names). For the remaining ones, we can see no relationship in the last 300 years.


        Additionally, contrary to a popular opinion, men kept changing their surnames, even to the family name of their brides. It was not a common process, but it was not an exceptional one either. Consequently, there is a small chance that the name you are seeing among the matches is not the surname that is being sought.


        Good luck!


        Mr. W.

        Comment


        • #5
          Genetic Distance info

          Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
          What is the genetic distance of the matches?
          Thank you to all who replied.
          To answer your question, there are three matches - I'll call them A, B, and C. At 12 markers, matches A & B are 0 genetic distance and match C is not listed.
          At 25 markers, A and B are GD 1 and C is GD 2.
          At 37 markers, A and B are GD 1 and C is GD 3.
          At 67 markers, A is GD 2, B is GD 3, and C is GD 4.
          Thanks for any help in deciphering. My friend has done Ancestry and 23andMe DNA tests and his one close match is also adopted

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CBokas View Post
            Thank you to all who replied.
            To answer your question, there are three matches - I'll call them A, B, and C. At 12 markers, matches A & B are 0 genetic distance and match C is not listed.
            At 25 markers, A and B are GD 1 and C is GD 2.
            At 37 markers, A and B are GD 1 and C is GD 3.
            At 67 markers, A is GD 2, B is GD 3, and C is GD 4.
            Thanks for any help in deciphering. My friend has done Ancestry and 23andMe DNA tests and his one close match is also adopted
            It would be hard to say if this is the father's surname or not. BUT, I would definitely keep that surname in mind when using the data from the autosomal matches. Hopefully your friend gets more closer matches and you can then start formulating a theoretical tree for them and the puzzle pieces might start coming together.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CBokas View Post
              Hello,
              New to this forum and genetic genealogy but not traditional research. I am helping a friend find his biological father. His Y-DNA 67 test came back with 3 matches, all with the same surname. Apologies if the answer to this is obvious but need to ask! Does this indicate that there is a likelihood that this surname is the biological father's surname.
              Thank you all for your help.
              Carol
              Agree with other contributor's comments and would add that if the ancestry on the Y line suggests Scandinavian ancestors or another culture which used patronymics where every generation uses a different surname this will effect your ability to discern your ancestral surname because it won't exist as most people understand it. Even when these Scandinavian males went to other places in Europe they took different names again once freed from the patronymic naming systems they emigrated from.
              I am from an I1 subclade and I have almost 95% of matches at 37 level in different surnames and at 67 level I have 23 out of 24 people all with different surnames. So for us it's totally normal. Anyone's guess what my paternal ancestor's name was based on my matches at any level.

              Comment

              Working...
              X