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How I found my birthfather

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  • #31
    Originally posted by gtc View Post
    Not categorically true for every case. Hypothetically, an mtDNA match may find a previously unknown sibling who may know who the searched for biological father is.
    I was talking about CuriousAdoptee's situation. Do you believe they should spend money on an mtDNA test to find their father's identity?

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    • #32
      Sorry to burst your bubble. MTDNA does work for both sexes.
      If you are ready to panic, my cousin did not have his DNA tested and we still match. (he is also deceased)
      Our latest perfect match is with a male that had a rare surname and from a small town in Northern California. It can't be me and they had a baby son as I lived in Indiana. I knew his girlfriend on earlier visits and this was before she become pregnant. Please explain to me why some guy would match my DNA without a reason. I won't use their names but ask FTDNA or people that match me to look at my first perfect MTDNA match for 9/2016.
      I have a new match with a gal? Katja so it would be the secone match.
      Last edited by darroll; 12 September 2016, 03:29 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by darroll View Post
        Sorry to burst your bubble. MTDNA does work for both sexes.
        If you are ready to panic, my cousin did not have his DNA tested and we still match. (he is also deceased)
        Our latest perfect match is with a male that had a rare surname and from a small town in Northern California. It can't be me and they had a baby son as I lived in Indiana. I knew his girlfriend on earlier visits and this was before she become pregnant. Please explain to me why some guy would match my DNA without a reason. I won't use their names but ask FTDNA or people that match me to look at my first perfect MTDNA match for 9/2016.
        I have a new match with a gal? Katja so it would be the secone match.
        I am well aware how mitochodrial DNA is and how it works. Males and females receive it from their mother, only females pass it on to the next generation. You seem confused on how it is inherited and in what situations using it for DNA testing can be helpful, in this case it is the opposite side of the tree that they are searching to find. The rest of your post I read 3 times and couldn't understand it at all so I can't answer, I will leave this thread be as it's getting off topic.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by mattn View Post
          I am well aware how mitochodrial DNA is and how it works. Males and females receive it from their mother, only females pass it on to the next generation. You seem confused on how it is inherited and in what situations using it for DNA testing can be helpful, in this case it is the opposite side of the tree that they are searching to find. The rest of your post I read 3 times and couldn't understand it at all so I can't answer, I will leave this thread be as it's getting off topic.
          This is the reason that I stay with FTDNA. MTDNA is a great tool but politically incorrect. They want to keep it complicated so people will spend more money.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by gtc View Post
            Not categorically true for every case. Hypothetically, an mtDNA match may find a previously unknown sibling who may know who the searched for biological father is.
            It sounds like daroll may have found a paternal relative, but they happened to share the same female ancestor to donated their X. MTDNA didn't exactly reveal the relative directly, it was just an oblique angle at the same targets.

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            • #36
              MtDNA can be done on both sexes and will show that a brother and sister match, or that they match their mother's brothers and sisters. However if you go back a generation on the mother's line only her daughters will match with her mother's mother and that lady's children. So my brother, who matches me, can match our mother's brothers and sisters and to those nephews and nieces who are born to our mother's sisters. Any nephew and niece born to an uncle would have the uncle's wife's mtDNA.

              If a person has their grandfather's mtDNA tested they could use that to match to their grandfather's mother's family up to a point. That point being that they would match the sisters and brothers of the great grandmother, but none of the descendants of the grandfather's uncles.

              So mtDNA can be used to trace male relatives but under very specific and limiting restrictions.

              And it can't be used to trace a male's line in the case of the OP since she doesn't have a sample of the father's mtDNA. Her mtDNA is present in her childrens' genetic makeup not their father's.
              Last edited by keigh; 14 September 2016, 01:52 PM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by keigh View Post
                MtDNA can be done on both sexes and will show that a brother and sister match, or that they match their mother's brothers and sisters. However if you go back a generation on the mother's line only her daughters will match with her mother's mother and that lady's children. So my brother, who matches me, can match our mother's brothers and sisters and to those nephews and nieces who are born to our mother's sisters. Any nephew and niece born to an uncle would have the uncle's wife's mtDNA.

                If a person has their grandfather's mtDNA tested they could use that to match to their grandfather's mother's family up to a point. That point being that they would match the sisters and brothers of the great grandmother, but none of the descendants of the grandfather's uncles.

                So mtDNA can be used to trace male relatives but under very specific and limiting restrictions.

                And it can't be used to trace a male's line in the case of the OP since she doesn't have a sample of the father's mtDNA. Her mtDNA is present in her childrens' genetic makeup not their father's.
                Thanks.
                I also found that one match seems to mutate with just one generation. (My Uncle had one mutation, he was my Mothers lost brother)

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