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  • Toki family in Aomori Japan

    I suppose I will post this here. My daughter in law is looking for her Biological family in Japan. I am helping her out digging around and trying to think out of the box on this.

    While we wait and hope there is something to be found in her US immigration file, we pursue the DNA testing as a back up "plan B".

    All we have is word of mouth, mother is (name removed) Toki and she lived in Aomori City, Japan. The adoption was around September 1983. A Navy family at Misawa adopted her from the mother, no orphanage.

    She tested on 23andme, 12 4th cousin matches and 114 distant cousins. She has been able to contact two 4th cousins or so in the US. She moved the results to GEDmatch and only had a few matches. She was able to contact a 3rd cousin or so in Japan. GEDmatch is really nice to use, however I was disappointed at the results.

    I wanted to post this here just in case anyone searches and finds the name. Toki is not a very common name in Japan.
    We believe it is her maiden name.

    So I want to ask if she should try FTDNA?

    Thanks Alan

  • #2
    Originally posted by 1alan1 View Post
    I suppose I will post this here. My daughter in law is looking for her Biological family in Japan. I am helping her out digging around and trying to think out of the box on this.

    While we wait and hope there is something to be found in her US immigration file, we pursue the DNA testing as a back up "plan B".

    All we have is word of mouth, mother is Seiko Toki and she lived in Aomori City, Japan. The adoption was around September 1983. A Navy family at Misawa adopted her from the mother, no orphanage.

    She tested on 23andme, 12 4th cousin matches and 114 distant cousins. She has been able to contact two 4th cousins or so in the US. She moved the results to GEDmatch and only had a few matches. She was able to contact a 3rd cousin or so in Japan. GEDmatch is really nice to use, however I was disappointed at the results.

    I wanted to post this here just in case anyone searches and finds the name. Toki is not a very common name in Japan.
    We believe it is her maiden name.

    So I want to ask if she should try FTDNA?

    Thanks Alan
    FTDNA has people too.

    Comment


    • #3
      She only had 51 matches on GEDmatch at 7 cM. Her top two were also on 23andme, but she was able to contact them through their email posted there.

      From my reading, it seems most people searching also post results on GEDmatch, but that doesn't appear to true from what we see. So I am thinking we need to try again maybe here at FTDNA.

      I just don't want to find a whole bunch of anonymous people that don't reply.

      Comment


      • #4
        You might want to contact the main office and inquire as to the number of tests that have been actually done for Japanese individuals. Tests sold and sent to Japan. If the percent is low the likelihood that she discover any matches is low.

        Comment


        • #5
          JAPANESE HERITAGE

          Isn't there a privacy issue here?

          I realise that you desperately seek this birth mother however am not sure if it is OK to publish her name in a public forum like this. Japanese are usually very private people and she may have expected her name to be kept private when she adopted out her baby. If this were a private adoption then perhaps expectations were very different.

          Aomori Prefecture in Tohoku is in the very Northern part of Honshu so if the mother lived there and adopted her child in Tokyo or other major city center, she may have left that area entirely by now. Another thing I suppose that you have considered- you said mother is Seiko Toki and she lived in Aomori City, Japan

          However SEIKO is usually a surname - and Toki may be her given name- not surname. As you may realise -Japanese names are written with the surname first in Japan ie: Tada Masahiko is Mr Tada and his christian name is Masahiko, so this mother may be TOKI SEIKO accordingly.

          Just a thought.
          Alexandrina Murray

          Comment


          • #6
            The issues is the adopting parents refuse to hand over any of her records from the adoption. If we had good information we could have found her a several years ago.

            The daughter in laws name is (name removed).

            I believe but not sure the mother remarried so Toki would be a maiden name now. Several of the stories we were told she was going to remarry.
            Yes she could be living anywhere. Also we only have word of mouth from the adopting parents that her name is (name removed), could also be (name removed). We were told she was born in Aomori City. We have no written documents other than a naturalization certificate.

            My hope is by some chance one day decides to search for her daughter and I want her name to pop up.

            Alan

            Comment


            • #7
              Japanese Adoption

              Your daughter in law can get a court order I suppose and insist that her adoptive parents hand over the information.

              Toki is not a surname in Japan definitely. It is a girls first name. The meaning is something like this.

              TOKI + KO if desired.
              An opportune time (take the chance- a time of opportunity)

              Her full christian name was arguably TOKIKO - KO being the diminutive suffix attached to TOKI.

              So her full name would have been Toki (Ko) SEIKO (Surname)

              She has every right to investigate the conditions by which she gained entry to the United States. She would have needed a full Visa and all paperwork would have been submitted to the State or Federal Govt at her time of entry. You need to follow this up with the Office concerned and investigate every step within her adoption process. Is there a record extant that she has had access to already?

              Please see the links below. Especially the second one.

              Why would the adoptive parents lie . Are they Japanese?
              Is one parent Japanese? Is your daughter in law full Japanese or does she possibly have one Caucasian parent?
              It is unusual if Caucasian parents were permitted to adopt a child in Japan that was not an orphan. Perhaps the mother has had a Caucasian partner who fathered her child and she had to adopt her because of the shame attached to her family because of this. The Aomori people are very traditional.

              NOTE:
              To bring an adopted child to United States from Japan, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

              Japanese law does not define “orphan.” Japanese law defines a “child who requires attention” as:

              Born out of wedlock;
              Abandoned infant;
              Parent(s) deceased or disappeared;
              Parents are incapable of providing support; or
              Abused.


              There are two types of adoptions in Japan – regular and special. Regular adoptions do not sever the ties between the child and his/her birth family. As a result, these types of adoptions may not be eligible for a U.S. immigrant visa. Japan introduced “special” adoptions in an effort to make Japanese adoptions more compatible with inter-country adoptions and to give more protection to adopted children under six years of age.

              The regulations are here:
              https://adopt.com/japan/

              Immigration Requirements for Adopted Children

              A Japanese child adopted by an American citizen must obtain an immigrant visa before he or she can enter the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident. The type of Immigrant Visa the child should obtain will depend on many factors including, but not limited to, the circumstances of the adoption and whether the child will be "officially" adopted in Japan before immigrating or in the U.S. after arrival.

              The first step in the adoption process, even before you have located a child, is to file the I-600A Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the Department of Homeland Security (USCIS) office having jurisdiction over your place of residence. Once a parent has an approved I-600A, he or she may file an I-600 in person at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo to begin processing the Immigrant Visa. Learn how.

              For more information on International Adoption, please visit the State Department website at
              http://adoption.state.gov/

              The Embassy's Immigrant Visas web pages provide information on obtaining an Immigrant Visa for your new child at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo or our Consulate in Naha.


              Alexandrina Murray

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Alexandrina View Post
                Toki is not a surname in Japan definitely. It is a girls first name. The meaning is something like this.
                There is Surname Toki in Japan.

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toki_clan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow Alexandria that's a post! Thank you, let me go through this an see if I can answer the questions.

                  My son and daughter in law have requested a copy of her birth record from USCIS but have not received a reply since applying in March. I sent them a link a week ago to write their Congressman for help.

                  The parents were ex-military and adopted three girls there. The father went to prison for 3 years over an indecent with one of them. This is what I am dealing with. I met with them before and talked about this and they refuse to give any information, just the minimal storey just a sightly different version and no paper work. They blamed my son for starting trouble looking for her family.

                  The adoption took place in 1983, my understanding is major changes happened to the process around 1988 or so. She was supposedly adopted from the mother at the hospital. She does have a few pictures with an old lady about 55+ years old my guess, the adopted parents say its the mother.

                  The naturalization certificate has (name removed) as her middle names. So I think this might be correct.

                  Her 23andme came back 97.2% Japanese, that was the main reason I suggested to be tested.

                  I think we can find the mother, just going to be a long fight. I started looking about two years ago when I had time. Its been a learning process and a lot of floundering around.

                  Thanks again for the help.
                  Alan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    JAPANESE ADOPTION BY US MILITARY COUPLE

                    Originally posted by Parameswara View Post
                    There is Surname Toki in Japan.

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toki_clan
                    Thank you Parameswara. It is my understanding that this is an ancient Clan name like the Minamoto is, or the Taira etc. However I shall delve deeper and ask if anyone knows of surname TOKI these days.

                    1alan1

                    So the adoptive parents were not Japanese. Are you sure that the process was actually a legal one? It would be dreadful if the children were actually taken out of the country illegally.Were they all adopted at the same time ?

                    There is no reason whatsoever for adptv parents to withhold this information from an adult child, unless perhaps something scurrilous went on behind the scenes. This could be the case if the adoptive father was a pedophile, as he appears to be. (3 years in prison for raping a child)

                    He certainly was not a fit and proper person to be adopting 3 young female babies. A 55 year old cannot give birth to a child . Even a 50 year old. 45 is pushing it, and very unlikely in Japan where 2 children is the norm, born in mothers' 20-35 yrs age time-frame, on average. Japanese women hold their age very well so a 50 year old might look 10 or more years younger than a western woman. So the woman in the picture would probably not be the baby's mother.

                    If the adoptive parents were military you need to follow up with the Navy, or the Air Base at Misawa, and discuss how it was possible for Military personnel on a tour of duty to be able to adopt not one, but THREE babies in Japan then bring them back on board a US Navy vessel, which it appears they may have done. The Misawa Air-Base has a Facebook page, or you can phone or email as well.

                    https://www.facebook.com/35thFighterWing/

                    EMAIL
                    35thfighterwing@gmail.com

                    WEBSITE

                    http://www.misawa.af.mil/

                    You should mention that you have a 'Confidential' matter to discuss as they won't respond to such a delicate matter on the FB Page. Ask for Archives Officer or similar after speaking with a commander. Use a PMessage. Advise them that there is a possibility that the child/ children were taken from Japan illegally because no-one can locate adoption papers. Not even authorities.

                    There MUST be records regarding Misawa crew held in archives. The files of the parents as military must hold info if they adopted in Japan and brought child / children/ Babies no less ! - home on a US Navy vessel. Passports would be needed for a start.

                    The Japanese passport office may help too. Akiko would be eligible for Japanese citizenship, not that she would want it as a US citizen she could not hold both. However that does not stop her requesting her Japanese one and demanding from US Military records all documents they hold pertaining to her and her adoption ( or illegal removal ?) . These documents may have a lot of information that you will not get in any other way. Her real name for starters; Akiko Toki may have been falsified by her American family.

                    Akiko needs to also be pro-active and if perchance she WAS taken illegally from Japan, then the Japanese Government may have a record of missing children .

                    I traveled to Japan annually mostly from 1975 to 1993 then less often thereafter, however was there again last year. I visited Yokata Air Base in 1983 & 1985 I think. Those bases are very strictly run. I cannot imagine Crew being allowed to adopt babies and bring them on board aircraft..nor Navy ships. Babies would simply not be allowed. Perhaps the adoptive mother flew home with them .

                    Hope some of this is helpful.

                    Alexandrina Murray.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks again Alexandria for the long post.

                      I am pretty sure it was legal adoptions at that time. The three girls supposedly are all from different places, not related. Just call each other sisters. Their family is 3 biological and 3 adopted.

                      She is naturalized US citizen, I have a copy of the certificate. So that would have required a load of information. My wife immigrated to the US in the same year and she had a inch thick folder of paperwork.

                      If the adopted parents were pressed to turn over her file they would simply say they lost it.
                      This whole deal is about "control" not what is morally right. If they hold the paperwork she will have to keep coming back to them asking for it.

                      I have contacted several people at Misawa. Base chapel says they don't keep any records, military usually destroy them or give them back later. I contacted the Mormon Church and they would not help either. I contacted ISSJ and they say they do not see any of the names in their records. I have searched Facebook trying to contact people and all dead ends, mainly no response.

                      Basically I am searching multiple paths at the same time.
                      I told my son to write his congressman to help get her records. She did the DNA testing to try that way. I have wrote everyone I can think of that might have any information, and made a few random posts, hoping that her mother might look for her one day out of curiosity.

                      Thanks again...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Still searching...
                        I got a story about my daughter in law run in the Japan Times. The writer said they did not receive any replies to the story.

                        She tested with Ancestry and the test just entered processing two days ago.

                        The adopted mother now says the photo of the daughter in law at age 2 sitting on her mothers lap, is actually a her great aunt. Sounds more feasible since they do not look similar at all.

                        The adopted mother has agreed to hand over some paperwork. But she said there is no Koseki or anything about her family. The daughter in law tried to tell her she found cousins, but got cut off ...She said you do not have any living relatives.

                        Just update to the story.

                        Does anyone know any stats about adoptions in Japan?
                        Like average age of mothers giving up children?
                        Most common reason why?

                        thanks Alan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1alan1 View Post
                          Still searching...
                          I got a story about my daughter in law run in the Japan Times. The writer said they did not receive any replies to the story.

                          She tested with Ancestry and the test just entered processing two days ago.

                          The adopted mother now says the photo of the daughter in law at age 2 sitting on her mothers lap, is actually a her great aunt. Sounds more feasible since they do not look similar at all.

                          The adopted mother has agreed to hand over some paperwork. But she said there is no Koseki or anything about her family. The daughter in law tried to tell her she found cousins, but got cut off ...She said you do not have any living relatives.

                          Just update to the story.

                          Does anyone know any stats about adoptions in Japan?
                          Like average age of mothers giving up children?
                          Most common reason why?

                          thanks Alan
                          maybe the cousin matches are related to her on bio dad's side and not bio mom's

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            test results

                            Got ancestry results back today, 1 4th cousin, 55 distant cousins.

                            Transferred the file to FTDNA, got 3 5th cousins! AARRGG!

                            23andme about 1 or 2 3rd cousins, about 12 4th cousins. total 129 matches.

                            Of course GEDmatch has people from all the testing places, she has 14 good matches there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              some things to ponder

                              This is for anyone how has cultural knowledge of Japanese and or are Japanese who might be able to kind help build a profile.

                              What would be the top reasons for a mother to give up their baby in Japan?

                              What kind of age estimate be for Japanese mother to give up a child?

                              Would at some point the bio- mother or possible siblings look for her?

                              Also any general info that is a custom or tradition etc that would come into play I might need to know. I don't have a lot of information to go on, so if I can kind of have a general idea it helps to narrow my search a bit.

                              Thanks.

                              Comment

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