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  • Nanopore Genome Sequencing

    Came across interesting article on how they can track spread of coronavirus cases using something called nanopore genome sequencing.
    They get the RNA from the virus, and treat it with chemicals until it has multiplied many times to become rich in genetic material, from that they get DNA from it and then do a whole genome sequence on it in a relatively short timeframe.

    Then they compare sequence to others from databases and they can then determine where it may have originated from.

    No idea how they compare the samples - like CMs/autosomnal matches or just look for patterns, as don't believe there is such thing as a Mr or Mrs CovidVirus, who get together to produce a bambino virus who then has y/mt dna info from which to construct a family tree.

    Here's the link:
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-...id-19/12965730

  • #2
    Originally posted by Wahski View Post
    Came across interesting article on how they can track spread of coronavirus cases using something called nanopore genome sequencing.
    They get the RNA from the virus, and treat it with chemicals until it has multiplied many times to become rich in genetic material, from that they get DNA from it and then do a whole genome sequence on it in a relatively short timeframe.

    Then they compare sequence to others from databases and they can then determine where it may have originated from.

    No idea how they compare the samples - like CMs/autosomnal matches or just look for patterns, as don't believe there is such thing as a Mr or Mrs CovidVirus, who get together to produce a bambino virus who then has y/mt dna info from which to construct a family tree.

    Here's the link:
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-...id-19/12965730
    Is this a new technology? I think I have heard genome sequencing in a documentary video about origin of Covid19 virus in Wuhan China. Is this the one or another technology?

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    • #3
      Not sure if you have read the article yet, but here is a quote from it.

      The Oxford-developed nanopore technology has been around for nearly a decade, but until recently it was confined to only the most well-resourced research laboratories.

      There were concerns it was not as accurate as another method called Illumina, but it did have a much shorter turnaround time and, in a pandemic, that was appealing.

      The collaboration between The Garvan Institute, The Kirby Institute and NSW Health proved the benefits of using nanopore sequencing when the sample was treated a specific way beforehand and analysed properly.

      They proved the nanopore method did not sacrifice accuracy.

      "Traditionally, it has taken a long time to be able to sequence whole genomes. In this outbreak the technology was able to be used quite quickly, and that's been the advantage," Dr Bull said.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Wahski View Post
        Not sure if you have read the article yet, but here is a quote from it.
        Sorry I just read the article now. The concept is still a bit blurry to me. But if the results are accurate and can be generated quickly then this tech is of great advantage and use.

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