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serial killer caught with help from genealogy DNA database

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  • #16
    Originally posted by John McCoy View Post
    This thread is now firmly in the realm of speculation. I believe several different stories may have been conflated, and some important facts and legal procedures have been omitted. Please check your sources with all the care you would use for your own genealogy.
    Gee. Inaccurate or contrived news stories, gossip, tall tales, and so-called genealogy. We might forgive those of our forebears who might have had less than perfect recall of family history when asked. But doing this purposefully gives journalism and genealogy a bad name.

    What's the difference? Think about it.

    As was said once before in an old TV program, "Just the facts, ma'am, just the facts."

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    • #17
      https://dna-explained.com/2018/04/30...iller-and-dna/

      A post from Roberta Estes re the Golden Gate Killer

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Biblioteque View Post
        https://dna-explained.com/2018/04/30...iller-and-dna/

        A post from Roberta Estes re the Golden Gate Killer
        Based on the Roberta Estes blog entry, going forward, some GEDCOM users might consider:
        • using just XX, or YY, or even only ZZ initials at GEDCOM;
        • using an anonymous e-mail address (that is something like zz@outlook.com) that is not being used anywhere else.


        That is not spelled out in her blog, but it can be inferred that investigators found a match
        1. either to a kit with a real name
        2. or with an e-mail address they could resolve to a real person.
        Cooperation from a family member is not eluded to (or did I miss that?).


        Mr. W.


        P.S.
        It is interesting to see that they had uploaded to GEDCOM the results from the second sample. This is where my knowledge stops. Why did police do that?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Frederator View Post
          I don't understand the panic. The report made it clear that they only used Gedmatch to arrive at clues to the perp's identity--confirmation had to be done by direct sampling of the suspect. It's not like they're going to try to convict the guy based on a Gedmatch profile. In court, this use of DNA will be subject to the same lab and chain of custody protocols that have been used since the technology was invented.
          EXACTLY. This is an astute observation.

          It matters not by what means the "suspect" was discovered to have become a "suspect". Even if and when tried in court the defense were to get a judge to disallow ALL of the DNA methodology of how the "suspect" was discovered, now that the prosecution knows who he is, there is now a ton of other evidence against him. He is a serial rapist and murderer. That other evidence is what will ultimately convict him.

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          • #20
            At Gedmatch, I had a group of 4 siblings on my match list. They have just disappeared from my match list.......

            Uhmm.....
            Last edited by Biblioteque; 1st May 2018, 08:56 AM.

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            • #21
              https://www.buzzfeed.com/peteraldhou...lZ#.etyR3JwX02

              Re this thread, I found this posted to the blog of Roberta Estes. Of course, we cannot believe everything we read, so this may, or may not, be correct information.
              Last edited by Biblioteque; 1st May 2018, 05:25 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Biblioteque View Post
                https://www.buzzfeed.com/peteraldhou...lZ#.etyR3JwX02

                Re this thread, I found this posted to the blog of Roberta Estes. Of course, we cannot believe everything we read, so this may, or may not, be correct information.
                "the investigators were able to run it on a “microarray”"
                Hmm, if forensic labs added DNA microarrays to their standard equipment (in addition to whatever they have for CODIS), there may be interesting times ahead.


                Mr. W.

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                • #23
                  IF the information in the buzzfeed link is correct, perhaps this is a reason for Gedmatch suspending uploads from FtDNA a couple of years ago.

                  Back then the Gedmatch kit number for a kit from FamilyTreeDNA was the FtDNA kit number with a letter in front (F I think it was).

                  Uploads from FamilyTreeDNA resumed once the numbering system was changed to a randomly generated number with T in front.

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                  • #24
                    Yes, and some of the kits from FTDNA were prefixed with N, those of us who originated with National Geographic.
                    Last edited by Biblioteque; 2nd May 2018, 06:06 AM.

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                    • #25
                      A while back there was something, I think on PBS, about the difficulty researchers have in getting African Americans to participate in DNA health research. There's a strong belief, justified or not, that the samples will be used by police to pin some crime on them or their relatives.

                      This may be unwarranted but when you live your entire life concerned about things like being pulled over for DWB, it's hardly unreasonable.

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                      • #26
                        GEDmatch is in the process of converting all members in their old system to their new system. One day I went from over 1,000 matches to less than 10. A few days later they were all back.

                        It may be the "The sky is falling, the sky is falling" syndrome or maybe they know there is a criminal in their line.

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                        • #27
                          https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/251081.pdf

                          This is an illuminating read re the legal process in some states, including California, published by the US Dept of Justice, and retrieved from the blog of Roberta Estes.

                          When justice is served, it is a good day for all victims.

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                          • #28
                            I didn't read the entire thread so I'm sorry if this has been addressed already. First of all, I guessed it was Gedmatch before it was confirmed. However, does Gedmatch only allow transfers of legitimate tests or can you re-create a DNA match? The story I read said police created a profile based on the DNA they found at the crime scenes.

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                            • #29
                              Technically, any lab that uses an appropriate "chip" should be able to generate SNP data that can be formatted in a way that GEDmatch can read.

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                              • #30
                                https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europ...p+news+stories

                                And, dna used in case in France.

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