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  • DNA Explained , GDPR

    https://dna-explained.com/2018/03/16...d-its-a-comin/

    Who keeps up with Roberta Estes blog? How is this going to affect us especially those of us who administer many kits?

  • #2
    I was aware of GDPR, before the topic came up here linked to the disappearance of the search feature. But I sleep well, as I convinced myself that my activities are covered by the scientific exemption

    In practical terms, together with other people involved in our family research, we will be insisting that dedicated e-mail addresses are used for FTDNA (and that they should not leak personal data; some are already OK, but for example some people have their birth year included in their e-mail address, while it might appear already anonymized - a misfeature of some social websites). However, we are uncertain how to present names. E.g. how to present Kelly Brown:
    1. K B,
    2. Ms K B or Mr K B (depending on sex),
    3. Kelly B,
    4. K Brown ?
    Probably 2, but what if there are many K Bs..., etc.

    Yes, I am aware that not everybody can sleep well. And I am not sure why ISOGG presentation stresses UK and Ireland so much. It applies to anybody handling European data.

    Many of the requirements are desirable business practices. After all, the issue was discussed at lengths before being approved. FTDNA had implemented some long time ago, for example:
    • removal of health related SNPs from Family Finder (FMS would be the only non-exempt test);
    • clear policy about being forgotten;
    • anonymization features are in place, sometimes they are optional, I am guessing they would be mandatory now;
    • no reselling or giving away of the customer data (this was actually one of the main original reason for the law).


    Also, she wrote many times about the case law. That is meaningful in England and in the US. A judge or jury in the continental Europe is not obliged by earlier rulings, they will interpret the law (GDPR) by themselves. Does that mean that different rulings by different courts are possible? Yes, but that is very rare, and when happens it is usually certain that one of them would be appealed. Not worth discussing details.

    Mr. W.

    P.S.
    FTDNA is nothing. Think about millions(?) of amateur and professional genealogists around the world that were and are collecting sensitive data about living people (copies of birth, baptism, marriage, professional etc. certificates). No exemption, as surely there is here "a risk to the rights and freedoms of the data subject"... And the only requirement is to have one living person from the EU on-file.
    Last edited by dna; 18th March 2018, 05:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dna View Post
      Think about millions(?) of amateur and professional genealogists around the world that were and are collecting sensitive data about living people (copies of birth, baptism, marriage, professional etc. certificates). No exemption, as surely there is here "a risk to the rights and freedoms of the data subject"... And the only requirement is to have one living person from the EU on-file.
      Maybe I missunderstand you, but is that not excempted.

      General Data Protection Regulation
      (18) This Regulation does not apply to the processing of personal data by a natural person in the course of a purely personal or household activity and thus with no connection to a professional or commercial activity.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JMAisHere View Post
        Maybe I misunderstand you, but is that not exempted.

        General Data Protection Regulation
        (18) This Regulation does not apply to the processing of personal data by a natural person in the course of a purely personal or household activity and thus with no connection to a professional or commercial activity.
        If you are a professional genealogist, then it is a commercial activity. No exemption based on (18).

        What about amateurs? The purpose of (18) is to introduce some sanity. Say, you would love to process personal data of your family (elderly parents, siblings, spouse, children) because you help them with something or you need their medical information, etc. You are protected. But, an amateur genealogist, like his professional counterpart, would naturally make sure that any genealogical facts (birth, baptism, marriage, etc.) are supported by documents. And thus, they would have copies of pertaining documents for living people (cousins, 2nd cousins,, their children, etc.). Where? I would say that nowadays not on paper, likely in a cloud. Not a household activity. Purely personal? Not anymore, because they share it on-line...

        Mr. W.

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        • #5
          Place data into the public domain

          The problem with most of the projects and data within the community is that individuals have not expressly consented and placed their results into the public domain. For projects with European members and data GDPR directly touches the information present that project.

          FTDNA is covering their butts by adjusting what is visible to clients and to non-clients due to GDPR based expectations. Those changes do not address the issue of higher level community access for additional analysis.

          I would recommend that projects transition to a community license for the participants data to remove GDPR concerns. Individuals would need to agree to this privacy change to remain in the project.

          For many years the R-U106 haplogroup project has had a statement in place that project members were placing their results into the public domain. We will be strengthening that statement and getting documented consent in place from users to allow the project to move forward with public data analysis efforts.

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          • #6
            wkauffman, are you referring just to projects such as Y surname projects and haplogroup projects?

            I research the public results on several of those projects because they are from some of my surname lines specifically a couple lines where either I am unable to find a male to test or one who is willing to test. I like to look at the results because at least I can get an idea of what I might see if I could get a male to test.

            It would be upsetting to me not to be able to see the results.

            I have cousins (who I have had tested) in three different surname projects and they are aware that they are in the projects but they have never given a specific permissions to be in the projects. I am the administrator of their kits and they have allowed me to do so.

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            • #7
              From Roberta Estes:

              https://dna-explained.com/2018/05/14...-so-much-gdpr/


              I copied from Ysearch yesterday because I have one male line which has those who had transferred from other companies.

              Copied one lines patriarch page from WFN today.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tenn4ever View Post
                From Roberta Estes:

                https://dna-explained.com/2018/05/14...-so-much-gdpr/


                I copied from Ysearch yesterday because I have one male line which has those who had transferred from other companies.

                Copied one lines patriarch page from WFN today.
                From another thread
                Originally posted by loobster View Post
                As I understand it - Geni created profiles on Geni for all the profiles on YSearch and Mitosearch - with the DNA Results attached to them - believe this was done before they announced profiles on Geni could be linked to FTDNA - which was announced on 6/30/2017 (https://www.geni.com/discussions/157595?msg=1092618 )

                per recent statement: https://www.geni.com/discussions/157595?msg=1216632 "The transfer of all the profiles from Ysearch and Mitosearch to Geni is a part of the plan to close down those sites."
                I cannot predict the future, but it looks like everyday life in Europe and everywhere else is not changing in ten days. And I am hoping that GDPR will be an incentive in the right direction, like airbags and seat belts laws.

                Please remember that GDPR changes nothing about what you can do with your own data, even if it is not good idea to do so.


                Mr. W.

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                • #9
                  Since some project administrators are still missing the e-mail updates, here is the link to the announcement FTDNA just made


                  Mr. W.

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