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Where are you from and why you took (or want to take) a genetic test?

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  • Where are you from and why you took (or want to take) a genetic test?

    While we wait for our samples to be completed, we can talk a little of us.

    I'm from Costa Rica and i didn't meet any of my grandfathers so five years ago i wanted to make a family tree. For five years until now i have been making my personal family tree. In all this period i scratch very deep, many branches go back 400 or more years (even 700 years in some spaniards ancesters that i have) in the past.

    But some of these brances were from indigenous or african slaves people, in that point the branch ends for obviusly reasons. So i starting to search about genetics and i find that in many cases phenotype is not related exactly with genotype. (people who look very white but have a lot of indigenous blood for example) I'm here because i want to discover how much i'm of each of these etnies. It's a way to rescue my personal history and the history of many of my ancesters.

  • #2
    Costa Rica?

    Originally posted by CostaRicaAdmix View Post
    While we wait for our samples to be completed, we can talk a little of us.

    I'm from Costa Rica and i didn't meet any of my grandfathers so five years ago i wanted to make a family tree. For five years until now i have been making my personal family tree. In all this period i scratch very deep, many branches go back 400 or more years (even 700 years in some spaniards ancesters that i have) in the past.

    But some of these brances were from indigenous or african slaves people, in that point the branch ends for obviusly reasons. So i starting to search about genetics and i find that in many cases phenotype is not related exactly with genotype. (people who look very white but have a lot of indigenous blood for example) I'm here because i want to discover how much i'm of each of these etnies. It's a way to rescue my personal history and the history of many of my ancesters.

    Comment


    • #3
      costa rican admixtures

      This is for CostaRicanadmix:

      Sorry my attempt to reply with a quote didn't work. I'm a vanilla Celt but my children are indigenous Ticos. One of them is in a batch that FT may never get around to finishing so we don't know what current testing will show - but by all sorts of traditional, classical genetic tests as well as very, very early mtDNA testing(when Eve had only 7 sisters) they exhibited either unknown alleles or ones statistically associated with native American populations. So we eagerly wait ...

      Meanwhile I'm surprised by the African Admixture you found. Traditionally that is supposed to be found almost exclusively along the Caribbean coast. Some of the St. Vincent Caribs came down along the coast from the north (visit Tortuguero - simply the greatest place on earth!)and look up "garifuna". But mostly the African admix is from farther south, check "slavery limon" to find accounts of the slaves, many of which came up from Panama. The indigenous people on the northeast slope of Talamanca would have been in a position to get some mix.

      To sum up - do not miss a stay in Tortuguero (take DEET).

      If you want to know more about the population characteristics of the indigenous Ticos there are a number of papers by anthropological geneticists (I used to be one myself). Try using various population designations in your searches e.g., "cabacar haplotypes" or "bribri mtDNA" - that sort of thing. (You only have about 8 or so names to work with) Be imaginative.

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      • #4
        edited to add ...

        I didn't mean to imply that there was no slavery or african admixture in central areas of Costa Rica. Just relatively little compared to other places. Good discussion of CR slavery here. 17th cent - some slaves imported. 18th century: "As whites took black women as their concubines, they freed the children that were born from this union. The same thing started to happen with the "zambos" or the children of the unions between Indians and Blacks. Some analysts have suggested that this tendency to free slaves was due in part to the desire of the owners to free themselves of the economic burden that slaves had become in a poor country such as Costa Rica. "

        Guanacaste? Entirely it's own story with it's own history. Nicaragua really. Not annexed by CR until independence. If you are from there the African admix would not be surprising and it would be great if you were to find out you were somewhat Chorotega. BTW the frequencies of various alleles really do vary between indigenous groups in Costa Rica. As do surnames. Be sure to look up the surname frequencies in the various groups. They are sometimes very limited and therefore a good clue.

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        • #5
          Hi, i'm from San Jose. All costaricans, with atleast a colonial ancester, have african admixture. Usually porcentages vary from 1 % to 10-11% but it could be more.

          I dont have any chorotega blood in me and majority of the population of the central valley is "Discconected" of the guanacaste people. They have a complete different origin.

          In a census of the xviii century, the 25 % of the population of Costa Rica was determined like "mulatos" because they have african blood. We cant deny our african admixture.

          I saw a few mistakes in the link you shared with me. But it's ok ...

          Sadly i dont know much about indigenous groups of Costa Rica but i should study more about them because of course they were my ancesters too.

          __________________________________________________ ___

          "The general population of Costa Rica has sometimes been considered to be the product of an amalgamation
          of groups of diverse origin. To determine the magnitude of accumulated admixture since Spanish colonization,
          11 classic genetic markers were analyzed in a total of 2196 individuals originating from five distinct regions of
          the country. A maximum likelihood approach was used. The proportions of genes of European, Amerindian and
          African ancestry were found to be 61%, 30% and 9% of the total population, respectively. Variation was observed at
          a regional level, with an increased European influence in the North (66%) and Central (65%) regions. Meanwhile
          an increase in Amerindian ancestry was found in the South (38%), and a higher incidence in the contribution of
          African genes was detected in the coastal regions (13% in the Atlantic and 14% in the North Pacific)"
          source: http://kerwa.ucr.ac.cr/handle/10669/...e-attribute=en

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