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New Book "Genetic Genealogy in Practice" - Has Anybody Seen It?

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  • New Book "Genetic Genealogy in Practice" - Has Anybody Seen It?

    Does anyone have any experience of Genetic Genealogy in Practice? It it basic, intermediate, or advanced? I wouldn't want to order it and then discover that it was beginners level. Amazon doesn't even carry it, so I can't read reviews.

  • #2
    Here's the announcement from May of the impending publication of the book - http://thegeneticgenealogist.com/201...and-apply-dna/. One of the authors is Blaine Bettinger, one of the best genetic genealogy bloggers around.

    There are more details about the book, by its co-author Debbie Parker Wayne, at http://debsdelvings.blogspot.com/201...genealogy.html. Here's her outline of the book's contents.

    Topics covered include:

    an introduction to biology basics and DNA inheritance patterns, only as much as needed for genetic genealogy
    ethics and standards (the Genealogical Proof Standard as applied to DNA and Genetic Genealogy Standards)
    Y-DNA STR and SNP tests, test result analysis, and application to genealogical problems
    mtDNA tests, test result analysis, and application to genealogical problems
    atDNA tests, test result analysis, and application to genealogical problems
    X-DNA test result analysis, and application to genealogical problems
    useful tools for analysis (tool usage and access information, not transitory step-by-step guides)
    incorporating multiple types of DNA into a family study
    supporting or refuting a paper trail with DNA
    incorporating DNA into a written conclusion
    exercises testing understanding of the concepts covered and application of those associated techniques to answer real genealogical problems
    an answer key to give the reader immediate feedback on the exercises
    a glossary explaining the terminology in plain language
    a list of references for additional study

    It's available in the National Genealogical Society online bookstore, at https://netforumpro.com/eweb/shoppin...7-a0f2f7d1e7cb.
    Last edited by MMaddi; 6 October 2016, 02:33 PM.

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    • #3
      I wonder how the above book compares to The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy by Blaine T. Bettinger, that Amazon will start selling in 10 days, but is already listed as a number 1 bestseller in Amazon genealogy category...

      Mr W

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      • #4
        I saw that book when I was searching for the other. I'm wondering which of the two is more advanced, or if they cover exactly the same material, one as a "text book" and the other as a "work book". It's not clear, to me anyway.

        I know there are books that go into the basics of genetics and then state what each test does. But I already know that. I'm looking for something that will tell me the best procedures for evaluating results in order to find unknown ancestors several generations back (like unknown 3rd great-grandparents) where there isn't any adoption involved.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
          I know there are books that go into the basics of genetics and then state what each test does. But I already know that. I'm looking for something that will tell me the best procedures for evaluating results in order to find unknown ancestors several generations back (like unknown 3rd great-grandparents) where there isn't any adoption involved.
          That would be nice, but I would be surprised if anyone could write such a book.

          In one of my cases, I was able to go from a brickwall with a third-great grandmother for whom I didn't even know her maiden name to her great-grandparents (before 1700). All I got from the experts is why I couldn't do that. Obviously the current autosomal matching methodology is far from perfect, but I do not believe any expert will express that view in a book.

          Jack

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          • #6
            Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
            That would be nice, but I would be surprised if anyone could write such a book.[----]
            Indeed, I was surprised to see those two books.

            In my opinion, not only the field moves too fast for a paper book to be able to offer anything but fundamentals, but also tests and tools vary between testing companies, so a useful text would be more of a user manual with screenshots, than a book.

            Mr W

            P.S.
            Yes, there is lots of generally useful knowledge, but it is not necessarily easy to understand for uninitiated.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
              That would be nice, but I would be surprised if anyone could write such a book.
              Really?

              I've thought about it before, but I wanted to focus on finding my birth father first. Now I'm ready to make a book my next project.

              Matt.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mkdexter View Post
                Really?

                I've thought about it before, but I wanted to focus on finding my birth father first. Now I'm ready to make a book my next project.

                Matt.
                Matt, what is your best success story on finding a distant ancestor with DNA?

                Thanks,

                Jack

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
                  I saw that book when I was searching for the other. I'm wondering which of the two is more advanced, or if they cover exactly the same material, one as a "text book" and the other as a "work book". It's not clear, to me anyway.

                  I know there are books that go into the basics of genetics and then state what each test does. But I already know that. I'm looking for something that will tell me the best procedures for evaluating results in order to find unknown ancestors several generations back (like unknown 3rd great-grandparents) where there isn't any adoption involved.
                  I heard an interview with the authors just last week. The Family Tree book is more of a introductory book.

                  The Genetic Practice book is a beginner/intermediate book, intended more for folks either deeply interested in genealogy or for professionals needing to add this to their scope of practice.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
                    Matt, what is your best success story on finding a distant ancestor with DNA?

                    Thanks,

                    Jack
                    My Deal ancestry brick wall. Johannes Hans Diehl 1645 - 1698.

                    also
                    Johannes Gohn 1718 - 1769.

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                    • #11
                      How exactly did you do it? I have my old brick wall of Enoch Hampton married Lucretia Duncan in Clark Co., KY on 6 Apr 1831. The parents of both of them are unknown, so I have 4 unknowns. Duncan DNA results seem to be a complete mix and Hampton results are contradictory.

                      Only a couple of distant Hampton matches here, but at Ancestry quite a few close matches, mostly descended from Enoch himself however. But among the close matches, my mother has

                      2 matches descended from one son of David Hampton m. Sarah (Wilson?). David lived Clark Co., left a Bible and a will. No Enoch. (the son whose descendants my mother matches was born too late to be Enoch's father).

                      2 close matches (plus a more distant one), in common with each other, descended a particular Bryan family in TN, descended from John Bryan m. Frances Battle. Another David Hampton in Clark Co., KY was married Mary Bryan, a daughter of this John Bryan and I have a fairly close match descended from this David Hampton. No Enoch in his very detailed will.

                      1 fairly close match descended from Ephraim Hampton, whose son, Oliver Hampton married Elizabeth Bryan (cousin of the above Mary). Oliver lived in Jefferson Co., KY. Only Oliver Hampton's ancestry can be traced. And my mother has a large number (for someone with only one grandparent who was in America before 1842 and had British ancestry) of matches descended from Oliver's mother's ancestors (Harris and Claiborne)plus a quite a few from his maternal grandmother's McMahan kin.

                      The 2 Davids in Clark Co. have unknown ancestry as does the wife of the one. There's not enough age difference for them to be father and son though.

                      The two Bryan girls were granddaughters of Morgan Bryan and Martha Strode and Mom has at least 25 matches at Ancestry descended from this couple. ( She had about 90 with Ancestry's first set of matching criteria and that was what drew my attention to this in the first place). And she has a dozen matches descended from Martha Strode's brothers plus some from further back in the Strode line.

                      It seems like Morgan Bryan and Martha Strode are probably my ancestors, but whether through David Hampton m. Mary Bryan or Oliver Hampton m. Elizabeth Bryan, I don't know. But the closer matches are to David Hampton m. Sarah Wilson. Perhaps those people are matching on Hampton DNA and the others are matching on Bryan. But how can I be sure of anything???

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mkdexter View Post
                        My Deal ancestry brick wall. Johannes Hans Diehl 1645 - 1698.

                        also
                        Johannes Gohn 1718 - 1769.
                        Thanks Matt. Am I correct in assuming that the Diehl deal was with Y-DNA. Was the Johannes Gohn breakthrough done with autosomal DNA?

                        Jack

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                        • #13
                          By the way, I ordered Genetic Genealogy in Practice, but it's out of stock at present.

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                          • #14
                            Both were autosomal.

                            Y DNA has not been helpful for me. I found my birth father with autosomal as well. Because of the lack of good YDNA matches and no patterns or similar sounding names, I thought my YDNA markers must be a little off or something so I tested my grandson and found out we were only one marker off out of 111. Then when I found my birth father I thought maybe there will be a difference there like 2 off or something but no, my father and I are exactly the same, 111/111. So it happens there were just not enough men tested that are connected to my YDNA ancestry.

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                            • #15
                              I helped my friend confirm his birth father with DNA tests as well. We found a link via a 3rd cousin (autosomal), then with some leg work he found a possible first cousin so we tested him both autosomal and Y, and he matched confirmating both the paternal side in common and the cousin relation. Both my friend and this man have nothing but Bumpass or similar names in their Y test match lists, yet their last name is not Bumpass. The point being that YDNA is not always helpful in determining the closer.

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