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  • #16
    Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
    Maybe the WHGs prefered hunting and gathering to farming? They may have seen hunting and gathering as part of their culture and were reluctant to abandon the ways of their ancestors. What evidence is there that P312 and U106 were Neolithic expansions?
    The TMRCA for the group that I belong to at yfull is 4,900 ybp. Some experts claim that yfull's estimates are 20% wrong. The estimate for my group should then be 5,880 which is Neolithic in western Europe.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      The TMRCA for the group that I belong to at yfull is 4,900 ybp. Some experts claim that yfull's estimates are 20% wrong. The estimate for my group should then be 5,880 which is Neolithic in western Europe.
      It doesn't mean that they were in Europe 5,880 years ago. They could just as easily have been in Asia or somewhere else.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
        It doesn't mean that they were in Europe 5,880 years ago. They could just as easily have been in Asia or somewhere else.
        They could have but where are the branches of my group that survived in Asia? I don't see them.

        The subgroup that I belong to is found mostly in Ireland and Scotland.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
          They could have but where are the branches of my group that survived in Asia? I don't see them.

          The subgroup that I belong to is found mostly in Ireland and Scotland.
          They were likely replaced by other populations in Asia and elsewhere. As far as I am aware, there is no evidence that R1b was in western Europe before the Bronze Age.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
            They could have but where are the branches of my group that survived in Asia? I don't see them.

            The subgroup that I belong to is found mostly in Ireland and Scotland.
            If I remember correctly, you belong to U106 which is not commonly found in Ireland or Scotland but is commonly found in Germanic areas of Europe.

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            • #21
              What do I know about it? Virtually nothing. Having said the, what about R1a-L664? They are reported to have arrived in NW Europe during the Neolithic. That was before Indo-European language groups arrived. Maybe they were instrumental in bringing Corded Ware into Europe?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                What do I know about it? Virtually nothing. Having said the, what about R1a-L664? They are reported to have arrived in NW Europe during the Neolithic. That was before Indo-European language groups arrived. Maybe they were instrumental in bringing Corded Ware into Europe?
                Who said that R1a-L664 arrived in NW Europe during the Neolithic?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
                  Who said that R1a-L664 arrived in NW Europe during the Neolithic?
                  Gee, I don't know anymore. But suffice it to say, I don't have the brains to come up with an idea like that, ha ha. Pushing it a bit further, though, if they moved into NW Europe during the Neolithic, then they (R-L664) did not arrive on horseback. They would've been engaged in "slash and burn" agriculture, most likely.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
                    If I remember correctly, you belong to U106 which is not commonly found in Ireland or Scotland but is commonly found in Germanic areas of Europe.
                    Each subclade has it own origin and that should be the goal of every tester. S5520 is found mostly in Ireland and Scotland. Estimated age according to yfull should be 4,900 minus 144.41 as it is one SNP downstream of Z156. The SNP S5520 was found in my Chromo2 test.

                    Yfull shows an average of 144.41 years per SNP plus 60 for the average age of the Big Y testers. If you click on info beside your terminal SNP at yfull you will see this.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                      Gee, I don't know anymore. But suffice it to say, I don't have the brains to come up with an idea like that, ha ha. Pushing it a bit further, though, if they moved into NW Europe during the Neolithic, then they (R-L664) did not arrive on horseback. They would've been engaged in "slash and burn" agriculture, most likely.
                      Oppenheimer stated in his book that R1a had reached western Europe in the Neolithic and he was right. The CWC ancient remains are the proof.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                        Gee, I don't know anymore. But suffice it to say, I don't have the brains to come up with an idea like that, ha ha. Pushing it a bit further, though, if they moved into NW Europe during the Neolithic, then they (R-L664) did not arrive on horseback. They would've been engaged in "slash and burn" agriculture, most likely.
                        What evidence is there that they moved into NW Europe during the Neolithic?

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                          Each subclade has it own origin and that should be the goal of every tester. S5520 is found mostly in Ireland and Scotland. Estimated age according to yfull should be 4,900 minus 144.41 as it is one SNP downstream of Z156. The SNP S5520 was found in my Chromo2 test.

                          Yfull shows an average of 144.41 years per SNP plus 60 for the average age of the Big Y testers. If you click on info beside your terminal SNP at yfull you will see this.
                          It probably arrived in Scotland and Ireland within the last 1500 years and was likely brought by the Anglo-Saxos, Vikings and/or Normans. I would not be surprised if it was brought to Ireland during the Ulster Plantation of the 1600s. Is it more common in Ulster than in other parts of Ireland?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                            Oppenheimer stated in his book that R1a had reached western Europe in the Neolithic and he was right. The CWC ancient remains are the proof.
                            Actually, CWC ranges from the late Neolithic to the early Bronze Age.

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                            • #29
                              R1a-L664 vs. the rest of R1a. The bulk of European R1a, largely the Slavs, are associated with the Indo-European language groups of the Bronze Age, etc. R1a-L664 split off from the rest at a very early date. They are found in NW Europe today, but the route and timing seems somewhat vague. The typical map showing routes into western Europe of the various subclades of R1a show L664 going up the Danube valley into NW Europe. But I think they may (also) have taken a broader path, such as from Russia into the northern Plain and even into Finland, using rudimentary "slash and burn" agriculture. I am R-L664 myself. So I am interested in this subject. My line came from Norway. And there is a member of my tiny sub-subclade from Finland. (See R1a project y-DNA results chart.)
                              Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 29 September 2015, 01:12 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
                                It probably arrived in Scotland and Ireland within the last 1500 years and was likely brought by the Anglo-Saxos, Vikings and/or Normans. I would not be surprised if it was brought to Ireland during the Ulster Plantation of the 1600s. Is it more common in Ulster than in other parts of Ireland?
                                I think that you are descended from Saxons. Did your ancestors arrive from East Anglia with Cromwell's army?

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