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The Irish, more like northern Spain then Brits.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    I guess the results and analysis will speak for themselves, whether they are useful or not,

    The Irish DNA Project newsletter stated the aims of the project in their October 2011 newsletter:

    http://www.familyhistory.ie/docs/DNA/DNA_01.pdf

    "(1) to further our knowledge of the population history of Ireland and its connections with other populations in Europe and (2) to help us understand how genes influence health in Ireland through the creation of a resource for use as ‘healthy’ controls in researching how genes influence common diseases in Ireland, including (though, not confined to) diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Through the collection and scientific analysis of this type of data it may be possible to identify genetic risk factors for disease and with this information, improve the nature of future treatments, including drug design or indeed lifestyle decisions on how to prevent the development of disease in the first place."

    Since there are multiple aims to this project their may also be multiple layers of analysis, released at different intervals.

    Time will tell.
    I think that is the real reason for the study.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    I don't think that we will learn anything from this project that we don't already know. They should have spent the money on ancient tests. This project is not about helping Irish people find their ancient roots.
    I guess the results and analysis will speak for themselves, whether they are useful or not,

    The Irish DNA Project newsletter stated the aims of the project in their October 2011 newsletter:

    http://www.familyhistory.ie/docs/DNA/DNA_01.pdf

    "(1) to further our knowledge of the population history of Ireland and its connections with other populations in Europe and (2) to help us understand how genes influence health in Ireland through the creation of a resource for use as ‘healthy’ controls in researching how genes influence common diseases in Ireland, including (though, not confined to) diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Through the collection and scientific analysis of this type of data it may be possible to identify genetic risk factors for disease and with this information, improve the nature of future treatments, including drug design or indeed lifestyle decisions on how to prevent the development of disease in the first place."

    Since there are multiple aims to this project their may also be multiple layers of analysis, released at different intervals.

    Time will tell.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    No.
    If you read my previous post you would see that I stated I was curious:

    "It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used."

    Mere curiosity, to see if the Irish DNA Atlas will report the same level as the National Genographic Project, R1b, R1a, I1, I2, T, U, etc etc or would they attempt to report on subclades further down the respective trees.

    I would be curious about such level of analysis in most countries.

    The ISOGG page for the Irish DNA Atlas project stated the following:

    "The genetic analysis will consider genetic variation across all of our chromosomes, although the researchers also intend to study specific lineages as described by the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA."

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    I have not cross-referenced this with Irish DNA Atlas sources to see if this type of analysis is still going ahead, or whether the project will stick with autosomal analysis only.
    I don't think that we will learn anything from this project that we don't already know. They should have spent the money on ancient tests. This project is not about helping Irish people find their ancient roots.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    So you think that the small number of people taking part are going to have different YDNA and MTDNA groups to those already tested.
    No.
    If you read my previous post you would see that I stated I was curious:

    "It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used."

    Mere curiosity, to see if the Irish DNA Atlas will report the same level as the National Genographic Project, R1b, R1a, I1, I2, T, U, etc etc or would they attempt to report on subclades further down the respective trees.

    I would be curious about such level of analysis in most countries.

    The ISOGG page for the Irish DNA Atlas project stated the following:

    "The genetic analysis will consider genetic variation across all of our chromosomes, although the researchers also intend to study specific lineages as described by the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA."

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    I have not cross-referenced this with Irish DNA Atlas sources to see if this type of analysis is still going ahead, or whether the project will stick with autosomal analysis only.

    Leave a comment:


  • hazel_ion
    replied
    Originally posted by dna View Post
    Please remember that you might have mtDNA ancestry related to Romans from 2000 years ago. And their empire included Northern Africa.

    The fact that the general population does not have their autosomal DNA footprint, does not mean that there could not be some mtDNA or Y chromosome lines dating back to Romans presence in Britain.

    W. (Mr.)
    I am open to all possibilities

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    As of January 2015 the Irish DNA Atlas Project has entered the analysis phase:

    http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/20...-analysis.html

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    They're hopeful to publish initial findings in early 2016.

    It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used.
    So you think that the small number of people taking part are going to have different YDNA and MTDNA groups to those already tested.

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by hazel_ion View Post
    Thanks, I will be watching for it.

    If it is true and they can prove people migrated north from spain it could explain why some of us with African mtDNA subgroups ended up in England/Ireland.

    I show northern african DNA in the GEDmatch admix tools and have L3e2a mtDNA. My female line is from England in the 1500's. I have not been able to go back further. There is no record of a "slave" and the subgroup I have is showing up all over the world in very small groups.
    Please remember that you might have mtDNA ancestry related to Romans from 2000 years ago. And their empire included Northern Africa.

    The fact that the general population does not have their autosomal DNA footprint, does not mean that there could not be some mtDNA or Y chromosome lines dating back to Romans presence in Britain.

    W. (Mr.)

    Leave a comment:


  • hazel_ion
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    As of January 2015 the Irish DNA Atlas Project has entered the analysis phase:

    http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/20...-analysis.html

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    They're hopeful to publish initial findings in early 2016.

    It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used.



    Thanks, I will be watching for it.

    If it is true and they can prove people migrated north from spain it could explain why some of us with African mtDNA subgroups ended up in England/Ireland.

    I show northern african DNA in the GEDmatch admix tools and have L3e2a mtDNA. My female line is from England in the 1500's. I have not been able to go back further. There is no record of a "slave" and the subgroup I have is showing up all over the world in very small groups.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    The Irish dna project is about autosomal dna.
    Are you under some impression I wasn't aware of that?

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    As of January 2015 the Irish DNA Atlas Project has entered the analysis phase:

    http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/20...-analysis.html

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    They're hopeful to publish initial findings in early 2016.

    It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used.
    The Irish dna project is about autosomal dna.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    That is proof of the Iberian invasion in the BA.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    As of January 2015 the Irish DNA Atlas Project has entered the analysis phase:

    http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/20...-analysis.html

    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Irish_DNA_Atlas_Project

    They're hopeful to publish initial findings in early 2016.

    It will be interesting to see what level their analysis reports to i.e. subclade levels for y-DNA and mtDNA as well as the autosomal groupings that will be used.

    Leave a comment:


  • hazel_ion
    started a topic The Irish, more like northern Spain then Brits.

    The Irish, more like northern Spain then Brits.

    http://www.sott.net/article/263587-D...iously-thought
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