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  • The Redlegs

    http://www.turtlebunbury.com/history...ow/redlegs.htm
    "Cromwell’s Puritan Republican regime now had control of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. And for those who opposed the regime, transportation to the colonies became a very real prospect. Between 1652 and 1657, approximately 50,000 men and women were rounded up by soldiers, shipped to Bristol, and "sold" (ie: placed into indentured servitude, be they willing or otherwise). Some were Scottish, some were English, but between 8,000 and 12,000 men appear to have been Irish, arrested in the wake of the conquest of Ireland and initially imprisoned in a series of holding pens in ports along the south coast of Ireland, as well as Belfast. From Bristol, they were taken across the stormy Atlantic to work on the sugar cane plantations, with circa 8,000 arriving into Barbados and the rest bound for other British colonies like Montserrat."

  • #2
    Wonder how many wound up in Virginia?

    Timothy Peterman

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    • #3
      Interesting that you found it but for someone with Irish background - over 1,000 years on my father's mother's side - this is hardly news or unknown.

      That and compared to what Africans got sent out as - sub humans - the Irish were much better off.
      Last edited by James78; 25 April 2015, 05:30 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by T E Peterman View Post
        Wonder how many wound up in Virginia?

        Timothy Peterman
        Don't forget the Carolina's. My understanding of Barbadian history is that about that time, the large slave owning plantations were squeezing out the smaller family farms which used indentured servants. By the 1660s, those small farm owners were in a rush to settle elsewhere. Cape Fear in South Carolina was one settlement that was tried and failed. My 8th great grandfather (at least two ways), Richard Eivens, either passed through Barbados in the mid-1600s or I think was actually born there in the late 1630s, fathered by an exile from Great Britain. After trying Cape Fear, Eivens and a group of others from Barbados settled in the Perquimans Precinct in North Carolina circa 1670.

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        • #5
          Here's a short 10 minute video on a project about the Irish who were exiled as slaves to the Caribbean, by Dr. Maurice Gleeson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzEQCmQdBhw. He is involved in the iCARA project (Irish Caribbean Ancestry - Reconnecting through dnA) at FTDNA, http://www.familytreedna.com/public/IrishCaribbeanY/

          Here is a longer presentation (over 1 hour), also by Dr. Gleeson, titled "Ireland and the Slave Trade." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxCK...U&spfreload=10

          He also provides the above presentation and its slides, along with other presentations he's given, at http://dnaandfamilytreeresearch.blog...downloads.html
          Last edited by KATM; 25 April 2015, 09:26 PM. Reason: spelled out iCARA abbreviation

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          • #6
            Originally posted by James78 View Post
            Interesting that you found it but for someone with Irish background - over 1,000 years on my father's mother's side - this is hardly news or unknown.

            That and compared to what Africans got sent out as - sub humans - the Irish were much better off.
            I have been studying Irish history for 40 years or more.

            Were they really?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 1798 View Post
              I have been studying Irish history for 40 years or more.

              Were they really?
              Yes, I guess they were better off. Or were they chased by the Ku Klux Klan? Did the Irish people suffer from apartheid policy or other racist laws?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by E19463 View Post
                Yes, I guess they were better off. Or were they chased by the Ku Klux Klan? Did the Irish people suffer from apartheid policy or other racist laws?
                It just shows how little you know about Irish history.

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