Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

R1b-Z156

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • R1b-Z156

    I looked up the internet two years ago to find out about this SNP. I read that Z156 is a defective gene in the bladder. I don't know how accurate this is. I thought that it may be linked to the Beaker period as traces of alcohol was found in the "Bell Beakers". The TMRCA for Z156 is around the time of the Beakers. Perhaps someone else has other ideas.

  • #2
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    I looked up the internet two years ago to find out about this SNP. I read that Z156 is a defective gene in the bladder. I don't know how accurate this is. I thought that it may be linked to the Beaker period as traces of alcohol was found in the "Bell Beakers". The TMRCA for Z156 is around the time of the Beakers. Perhaps someone else has other ideas.
    Would too much alcohol harm a person's bladder and be the cause of a defect in it? When did humans start drinking alcohol?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      I looked up the internet two years ago to find out about this SNP. I read that Z156 is a defective gene in the bladder.
      That must be another Z156. The academic world does not yet even know about citizen-discovered SNPs like Z156--academics certainly haven't run medical studies on it.

      More importantly, Y chromosome SNPs are almost never medically significant, simply because the Y chromosome has very few functional genes at all--it is mostly an on/off (or rather male/female) switch.

      Comment


      • #4
        Except for reproductive genes, of course.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
          That must be another Z156. The academic world does not yet even know about citizen-discovered SNPs like Z156--academics certainly haven't run medical studies on it.

          More importantly, Y chromosome SNPs are almost never medically significant, simply because the Y chromosome has very few functional genes at all--it is mostly an on/off (or rather male/female) switch.
          There must be a reason for these permanent YDNA mutations. The scientists just haven't discovered it yet and they don't even seem to be interested in them.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
            That must be another Z156. The academic world does not yet even know about citizen-discovered SNPs like Z156--academics certainly haven't run medical studies on it.

            More importantly, Y chromosome SNPs are almost never medically significant, simply because the Y chromosome has very few functional genes at all--it is mostly an on/off (or rather male/female) switch.

            http://www.medicinenet.com/script/ma...rticlekey=8902

            "It has often been said that little is known about specific genes that might be Y-linked (holandric) in their inheritance. A number of genes are known to be Y-linked including:

            ASMTY (which stands for acetylserotonin methyltransferase),
            TSPY (testis-specific protein),
            IL3RAY (interleukin-3 receptor),
            SRY (sex-determining region),
            TDF (testis determining factor),
            ZFY (zinc finger protein), PRKY (protein kinase, Y-linked),
            AMGL (amelogenin),
            CSF2RY (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, alpha subunit on the Y chromosome),
            ANT3Y (adenine nucleotide translocator-3 on the Y),
            AZF2 (azoospermia factor 2),
            BPY2 (basic protein on the Y chromosome),
            AZF1 (azoospermia factor 1),
            DAZ (deleted in azoospermia),
            RBM1 (RNA binding motif protein, Y chromosome, family 1, member A1),
            RBM2 (RNA binding motif protein 2) and
            UTY (ubiquitously transcribed TPR gene on Y chromosome)."

            Comment


            • #7
              When did humans start drinking alcohol?


              Considering how many animal species enjoy naturally fermented fruits I would suggest that humans have been "drinking" alcohol since we first ate fermented fruits lying on the ground.

              Thee serpent hidden in that apple!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jomid59 View Post
                When did humans start drinking alcohol?


                Considering how many animal species enjoy naturally fermented fruits I would suggest that humans have been "drinking" alcohol since we first ate fermented fruits lying on the ground.

                Thee serpent hidden in that apple!
                When did humans start making alcohol? In the Neolithic!!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_beer
                  "As almost any cereal containing certain sugars can undergo spontaneous fermentation due to wild yeasts in the air, it is possible that beer-like beverages were independently developed throughout the world soon after a tribe or culture had domesticated cereal. Chemical tests of ancient pottery jars reveal that beer was produced about 3,500 BC in what is today Iran, and was one of the first-known biological engineering tasks where the biological process of fermentation is used. Also recent archaeological findings showing that Chinese villagers were brewing fermented alcoholic drinks as far back as 7000 BC on small and individual scale, with the production process and methods similar to that of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia."

                  The Bell Beaker people certainly liked their beer.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X