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The next Ice Age.

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  • The next Ice Age.

    The next Ice Age could already have begun. The scientists say that we are due another one in the future. The majority of the people who live in that region that will be affected will not survive. Millions of people could not move south into other countries without wrecking their economies so the borders would be closed. I believe that this happened during the last Ice Age also. Any region could absorb some refugees.

  • #2
    Technically we could call the entire Pleistocene an "ice age" given permanent polar ice caps (Antarctica, Greenland) and nearly periodic advances of ice sheets.

    It has been shown that Earth's orbit drives the periodicity of glacial advances during the Pleistocene, though not all temporal variations or magnitude of glaciation can be accounted for by the orbit.

    Human modification of the atmosphere (adding CO2) will certainly prevent the advance of any ice sheets for very many millennia, and will almost certainly lead to a significant reduction of the current ice caps.

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    • #3
      I'll add that anthropologists today sometimes concentrate on climate changes to understand our deep ancestors' movements. For example, during the height of the last glaciation the lowered sea levels were a determining factor in the peopling of the Americas, and the retreat of ice sheets in Europe allowed modern humans to move north.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by S9 H9 View Post
        I'll add that anthropologists today sometimes concentrate on climate changes to understand our deep ancestors' movements. For example, during the height of the last glaciation the lowered sea levels were a determining factor in the peopling of the Americas, and the retreat of ice sheets in Europe allowed modern humans to move north.
        I would like to know the autosomal dna of the people who lived in northern Europe before the Ice-Age and survived it.I think that is important for all of us who live in western Europe. It is something that is not discussed here or on any forum. It is as if they were all wiped out and I don't believe that is the case.

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        • #5
          the next Ice Age

          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
          I would like to know the autosomal dna of the people who lived in northern Europe before the Ice-Age and survived it.I think that is important for all of us who live in western Europe. It is something that is not discussed here or on any forum. It is as if they were all wiped out and I don't believe that is the case.
          I don't think so either! But there is no evidence of anyone in northern Europe (or very little). The great flood demolished northern Europe and left little evidence other than the Eastern shore of Scotland and its massive debris heaps. The absence of R1b Y DNA, is a mystery, but there is little Y DNA of any kind available from 9K BC to 6K BC. That does make one wonder?

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          • #6
            If they lived, they have vanished living no descendants.

            It is like Norse people in Greenland who vanished with the onset of the Little Ice Age, except that the ice sheet in Central and Northern Europe obliterated almost all the traces of anything living.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dna View Post
              If they lived, they have vanished living no descendants.

              It is like Norse people in Greenland who vanished with the onset of the Little Ice Age, except that the ice sheet in Central and Northern Europe obliterated almost all the traces of anything living.
              So you are able to make mistakes too, maith thu.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                So you are able to make mistakes too, maith thu.
                Mandatory viewing The The Impotence of Proofreading by Taylor Mali!

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                • #9
                  The time period of modern humans into northern Europe do not predate the last glacial maximum, if by "north" we mean higher in latitude than the Alps, at least from any paper of which I am aware. At the time of the last glacial maximum we moderns apparently hung out in the Balkan area and around the Black Sea, and then followed the rivers up to the north as the ice melted.

                  There is evidence of Neanderthals of course living in Europe before the last glacial maximum. And much earlier (during an interglacial period during the Pleistocene) H. heidelbergensis left remains and evidence in northern Europe.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by S9 H9 View Post
                    The time period of modern humans into northern Europe do not predate the last glacial maximum, if by "north" we mean higher in latitude than the Alps, at least from any paper of which I am aware. At the time of the last glacial maximum we moderns apparently hung out in the Balkan area and around the Black Sea, and then followed the rivers up to the north as the ice melted.

                    There is evidence of Neanderthals of course living in Europe before the last glacial maximum. And much earlier (during an interglacial period during the Pleistocene) H. heidelbergensis left remains and evidence in northern Europe.
                    Are you saying that there were no modern humans living in northern Europe before 25,000 ybp? The LGM is supposed to have lasted from 25,000-13,000 ybp.

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                    • #11
                      The last glacial maximum was a bit over 20,000 years ago. I am not aware of any modern human remains (either bones, or tools, etc.) from Northern Europe that predate this. If you know of any paper that gives evidence otherwise I'd be interested in reading it.

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                      • #12
                        Where were the Cro-Magnon, Aurignacian, Magdalenian & Gravettian sites located? I think the answer is France & these were from before the LGM, but I'm not sure how far to the north in France they were.

                        Timothy Peterman

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by S9 H9 View Post
                          The last glacial maximum was a bit over 20,000 years ago. I am not aware of any modern human remains (either bones, or tools, etc.) from Northern Europe that predate this. If you know of any paper that gives evidence otherwise I'd be interested in reading it.

                          http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancie...hic-era-001548
                          "The Venus figurines is a term given to a collection of prehistoric statuettes of women made during the Paleolithic Period, mostly found in Europe, but with finds as far as Siberia. To date, more than 200 of the figurines have been found, all of whom are portrayed with similar physical attributes, including curvaceous bodies with large breasts, bottoms, abdomen, hips, and thighs, and usually tapered at the top and bottom. The heads are often of relatively small size and devoid of detail, and most are missing hands and feet. Some appear to represent pregnant women, while others show no such signs. There have been many different interpretations of the figurines, but none based on any kind of solid evidence. Like many prehistoric artifacts, the cultural meaning may never be known. The Paleolithic period lasted from around 30,000 BC to 10,000 BC and is characterised by the emergence of human creativity. Man-made artifacts from this period show the very earliest signs of workmanship, from small personal adornments and cave paintings to the prevalent Venus figurines, which represent the earliest known works of figurative art. The figurines were carved from all manner of different materials, ranging from soft stone (such as steatite, calcite, or limestone) to bone, ivory, or clay. The latter type are among the earliest ceramic works yet discovered. The oldest statuette was uncovered in 2008 in Germany. The "Venus of Hohle Fels”, as the figure has since been called, was carved from a mammoth’s tusk and dates to at least 35,000 years old. "

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                          • #14
                            I had forgotten about the Venus, and it is a good example (along with other items from the cave) of early art. Unfortunately we don't know who made these items, or from where they originated.

                            It has been proposed before that one path for modern humans to move up (from the Black Sea area) into Northern Europe was along the Danube, and Schelklingen, Germany isn't that far from the Danube.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by S9 H9 View Post
                              [----] Germany isn't that far from the Danube.
                              658-687 kilometres of Danube are in today's Germany

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