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  • #61
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    Unfortunate that Professor Bradley is not currently focused on ancient DNA in human remains.
    Why? You could write to him and tell him that you think that you have 12% autosomal Irish dna.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      Why?
      Why is Professor Bradley is not focused on ancient DNA in human remains?
      I'm not sure, maybe it has something to do with funding. He may not be interested in ancient DNA in humans anymore, only domesticated animals.


      Thanks for highlighting out that you missed the point I made in my post: http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...7&postcount=60

      I was genuinely stating that it is unfortunate that he is not focused on ancient DNA in human remains. Hopefully someone else will pick up the research interest...so that we can discuss ACTUAL results.

      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      You could write to him and tell him that you think that you have 12% autosomal Irish dna.
      I could write to him and state this.
      He may turn around and ask me why I have written to tell him this.
      My response would be that an acquittance of mine, from Ireland, thought it would re-spark his interest in ancient Irish DNA.

      I'm sure he'd drop everything and get back to analysing ancient human remains

      Are you sure you don't want to write to him?
      A request might carry more weight if it comes from someone who is 100% Irish.
      Last edited by N21163; 17 June 2014, 06:18 PM.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by N21163 View Post

        Are you sure you don't want to write to him?
        A request might carry more weight if it comes from someone who is 100% Irish.
        Prof Bradley knows the dna of the Irish. I don't need to write to him again.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
          Prof Bradley knows the dna of the Irish. I don't need to write to him again.
          LOL...I'll wait for updated results to be published

          I wonder if he's done any more collaborative work with George Busby...hmm will look into that.

          Bringing the conversation back to my original point, the 2004 article is outdated.

          Hopefully there will be some updated ancient Irish DNA will be reported in the near future to encourage discussion.

          Not that I don't enjoy our moments of banter
          Last edited by N21163; 18 June 2014, 03:04 AM.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by N21163 View Post
            LOL...I'll wait for updated results to be published

            I wonder if he's done any more collaborative work with George Busby...hmm will look into that.

            Bringing the conversation back to my original point, the 2004 article is outdated.

            Hopefully there will be some updated ancient Irish DNA will be reported in the near future to encourage discussion.

            Not that I don't enjoy our moments of banter
            I would like to see a study that links Irish dna subgroups with the Halstatt and La Tene areas in Austria and Switzerland.

            "The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Central European culture from the 8th to 6th centuries BC (European Early Iron Age), developing out of the Urnfield culture of the 12th century BC (Late Bronze Age) and followed in much of Central Europe by the La Tène culture. It is commonly associated with Proto-Celtic and Celtic populations in the Western Hallstatt zone and with (pre-)Illyrians in the eastern Hallstatt zone."

            "The La Tène culture was a European Iron Age culture named after the archaeological site of La Tène on the north side of Neuenburgersee in Switzerland, where a rich cache of artifacts was discovered by Hansli Kopp in 1857.

            La Tène culture developed and flourished during the late Iron Age (from 450 BCE to the Roman conquest in the 1st century BCE) in Belgium, eastern France, Switzerland, Austria, Southern Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania. To the north extended the contemporary Jastorf culture of Northern Germany.[1]

            La Tène culture developed out of the early Iron Age Hallstatt culture without any definite cultural break, under the impetus of considerable Mediterranean influence from the Culture of Golasecca,[2] the Greeks in pre-Roman Gaul and later Etruscan civilizations.[3] Barry Cunliffe notes localization of La Tène culture during the 5th century when there arose "two zones of power and innovation: a Marne – Moselle zone in the west with trading links to the Po Valley via the central Alpine passes and the Golasecca culture, and a Bohemian zone in the east with separate links to the Adriatic via the eastern Alpine routes and the Venetic culture".[4] A shift of settlement centres took place in the 4th century."

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            • #66
              Why the need to connect the Irish to Hallstatt and/or La Tene?

              There were Celts before and beyond Hallstatt and La Tene. Those were Iron Age cultures and thus relatively late. People were speaking Celtic for over a thousand years before the Hallstatt culture began, and, of course, Hallstatt came before La Tene.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Stevo View Post
                Why the need to connect the Irish to Hallstatt and/or La Tene?

                There were Celts before and beyond Hallstatt and La Tene. Those were Iron Age cultures and thus relatively late. People were speaking Celtic for over a thousand years before the Hallstatt culture began, and, of course, Hallstatt came before La Tene.
                I think it is important to prove or disprove that there was a migration to Ireland from these areas around 500BC.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                  I think it is important to prove or disprove that there was a migration to Ireland from these areas around 500BC.
                  Oh, but just where did they originally come from? And let me give you something to consider. For instance, genetically by SNP markers I am L21+, M222+ and S660+ which is predominantly northwestern Irish but also is distributed to a lesser degree in the Hebrides and in western Scotland, too, and another fellow in my same genetic group and I have something in common, his family tracing back in the north of Ireland for 1,000 years or more. And get ready for this, but after he and I took the Big Y test it turned out that we both have an African Aborigine SNP marker, really ancient and far upstream. But yeah, me with milky white skin and green eyes, I can now claim to be of African origin!

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                    And get ready for this, but after he and I took the Big Y test it turned out that we both have an African Aborigine SNP marker, really ancient and far upstream. But yeah, me with milky white skin and green eyes, I can now claim to be of African origin!
                    I'm not sure I quite understand your position on this.

                    What does "An African Aborigine SNP marker really ancient and far upstream" mean?

                    You do understand that having one SNP far upstream does not have any bearing on your ethnicity now.

                    If that were the case, every person who completes the Big Y test might as well say they are African, as each person would have "ancient SNP markers far upstream" of some kind.

                    In addition, this one ancient SNP would make up an infinitesimal amount of your overall ancestry and would not support a claim of African ancestry.

                    On a side note to 1798 (just in case you feel the need to chime in)...no my 12% autosomal Irish DNA does not make me Irish. I never claimed to be Irish, I stated I had some Irish ancestry.

                    Arran

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                      I think it is important to prove or disprove that there was a migration to Ireland from these areas around 500BC.
                      I agree, it would be good to know.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by N21163 View Post
                        I'm not sure I quite understand your position on this.

                        What does "An African Aborigine SNP marker really ancient and far upstream" mean?

                        You do understand that having one SNP far upstream does not have any bearing on your ethnicity now.

                        Arran
                        Yes, I understand your question, thank you, and I do not see myself as having any sort of African ethnicity today. But currently I am working with several genetic experts and, after my taking the Big Y test and giving them the Big Y BAM file, one of them then said that I and another fellow of quite similar genetics have an apparently ancient African Aborigine SNP marker, far upstream. Oh, that was unexpected!

                        Yet I was motivated to respond to the query of 1798, who was interested in the migrants to Ireland of about 500 BC, and so I responded that I myself apparently have a genetic SNP marker that could be tens of thousands of years old, far older than just 500 BC.

                        I was one of the early adopters of the Big Y test and so I got preliminary results, including some ancient SNP test results. And the story goes that FTDNA is no longer providing such ancient history, so reports of such ancient African Aborigine SNP markers might no longer be available. But that is not to say that there could be those of the Hebrides, Ireland and Scotland who could also have the same SNP marker.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                          Oh, but just where did they originally come from? And let me give you something to consider. For instance, genetically by SNP markers I am L21+, M222+ and S660+ which is predominantly northwestern Irish but also is distributed to a lesser degree in the Hebrides and in western Scotland, too, and another fellow in my same genetic group and I have something in common, his family tracing back in the north of Ireland for 1,000 years or more. And get ready for this, but after he and I took the Big Y test it turned out that we both have an African Aborigine SNP marker, really ancient and far upstream. But yeah, me with milky white skin and green eyes, I can now claim to be of African origin!
                          We are all from Africa within the last 200,000 years. That's what the scientists say so they must be right!!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by N21163 View Post
                            I agree, it would be good to know.
                            It would be good to know the dna of the real Celts.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                              But yeah, me with milky white skin and green eyes, I can now claim to be of African origin!
                              So you are claiming African origin?

                              Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                              Yes, I understand your question, thank you, and I do not see myself as having any sort of African ethnicity today.
                              Or not claiming African origin?

                              Originally posted by Tourist View Post
                              But currently I am working with several genetic experts and, after my taking the Big Y test and giving them the Big Y BAM file, one of them then said that I and another fellow of quite similar genetics have an apparently ancient African Aborigine SNP marker, far upstream. Oh, that was unexpected!

                              Yet I was motivated to respond to the query of 1798, who was interested in the migrants to Ireland of about 500 BC, and so I responded that I myself apparently have a genetic SNP marker that could be tens of thousands of years old, far older than just 500 BC.

                              I was one of the early adopters of the Big Y test and so I got preliminary results, including some ancient SNP test results. And the story goes that FTDNA is no longer providing such ancient history, so reports of such ancient African Aborigine SNP markers might no longer be available. But that is not to say that there could be those of the Hebrides, Ireland and Scotland who could also have the same SNP marker.
                              What "ancient African Aborigine" SNP are you referring to?

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                                It would be good to know the dna of the real Celts.
                                The "real" Celts?

                                Who are the imitation Celts then?

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