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  • Comparing to your competitors..

    So my FTDNA originally came back 97% British Isles and 3% Scandinavian, Which fit with what I would have guessed. Then after the recent " enhancements " to the site I am showing the same except about 38% Central European. I guess they are counting Irish as Gaul or something ? So my Identical Twin Brother takes the test with Ancestry DNA and comes back closer to what I was with the first round of MYFTDNA.. 95% British Isles and about 5% Scandinavian. Plus they break out the British Isles at about 58% Irish and British at about 37%.( Again , just what I would have guessed ). This is something MYFTDNA can or does not do because they say those from the Isles are too close to distinguish from one another...I am beginning to wish I would have used Ancestry DNA. They are also showing more DNA matches, evidently because their data base is larger.
    Tom Allport
    FTDNA Customer
    Last edited by Tom Allport; 22 May 2017, 10:09 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Tom Allport View Post
    So my FTDNA originally came back 97% British Isles and 3% Scandinavian, Which fit with what I would have guessed. Then after the recent " enhancements " to the site I am showing the same except about 38% Central European. I guess they are counting Irish as Gaul or something ? So my Identical Twin Brother takes the test with Ancestry DNA and comes back closer to what I was with the first round of MYFTDNA.. 95% British Isles and about 5% Scandinavian. Plus they break out the British Isles at about 58% Irish and British at about 37%.( Again , just what I would have guessed ). This is something MYFTDNA can or does not do because they say those from the Isles are too close to distinguish from one another...I am beginning to wish I would have used Ancestry DNA. They are also showing more DNA matches, evidently because their data base is larger.
    You probably don't want to spend the extra money for a $20 transfer, but it would be interesting to know what your brother's analysis would be here given that his Ancestry results and your v1 MO results are so similar.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would say that for the three main companies (FTDNA, 23andMe, Ancestry.com), the ethnicity/biogeographical analysis is not the main focus for them. But, unfortunately, it is a very good marketing tool to draw more customers.

      23andMe is primarily interested in customers who want to know what DNA can tell them about their risks for health and disease (they sell aggregate information of their customers for research); Ancestry is primarily interested in customers who will pay for a subscription to access records and family trees of other customers for genealogy (they may be setting up to offer health results as well to their DNA testers); and FTDNA is interested in customers who want to buy DNA tests to find relatives for genealogy. These ethnicity analyses are offered and advertised to draw more customers in for each business.

      It is unfortunate because these kinds of analyses are 1) still in their infancy, and 2) not explained well to the customer. Genetic genealogy bloggers have been writing assorted articles about the flaws and weaknesses of these analyses for some time now, including:

      So, as Judy Russell says in her article, "it's not soup yet. And it may never be." Basically, caveat emptor, buyer beware; especially if ethnicity analysis is your only reason for doing such testing.
      KATM
      mtDNA: K1a3 / YDNA: R-FGC46379
      Last edited by KATM; 23 May 2017, 02:24 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Transfer

        Originally posted by vinnie View Post
        You probably don't want to spend the extra money for a $20 transfer, but it would be interesting to know what your brother's analysis would be here given that his Ancestry results and your v1 MO results are so similar.
        Please tell me what is involved in Transfer ?> How do you go about it ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by KATM View Post
          I would say that for the three main companies (FTDNA, 23andMe, Ancestry.com), the ethnicity/biogeographical analysis is not the main focus for them. But, unfortunately, it is a very good marketing tool to draw more customers.

          23andMe is primarily interested in customers who want to know what DNA can tell them about their risks for health and disease (they sell aggregate information of their customers for research); Ancestry is primarily interested in customers who will pay for a subscription to access records and family trees of other customers for genealogy (they may be setting up to offer health results as well to their DNA testers); and FTDNA is interested in customers who want to buy DNA tests to find relatives for genealogy. These ethnicity analyses are offered and advertised to draw more customers in for each business.

          It is unfortunate because these kinds of analyses are 1) still in their infancy, and 2) not explained well to the customer. Genetic genealogy bloggers have been writing assorted articles about the flaws and weaknesses of these analyses for some time now, including:

          So, as Judy Russell says in her article, "it's not soup yet. And it may never be." Basically, caveat emptor, buyer beware; especially if ethnicity analysis is your only reason for doing such testing.
          Originally posted by vinnie View Post
          You probably don't want to spend the extra money for a $20 transfer, but it would be interesting to know what your brother's analysis would be here given that his Ancestry results and your v1 MO results are so similar.

          Comment


          • #6
            What is VI MO ? And how do you discern what GED match is saying ? I uploaded into it but cannot understand the results ?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tom Allport View Post
              Please tell me what is involved in Transfer ?> How do you go about it ?
              Transfer is free, but "After transferring, you can unlock all Family Finder features, which include the Chromosome Browser, myOrigins, and ancientOrigins for only $19. "

              Note: I believe they have a system in place that prevents identical results being transferred, they allow only one tested result per person.
              In case of identical twin, one may have to contact them before proceeding as it may flag file as already in database.

              https://www.familytreedna.com/autosomal-transfer

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tom Allport View Post
                What is VI MO ? And how do you discern what GED match is saying ? I uploaded into it but cannot understand the results ?
                By "v1 MO," it means version 1 of the myOrigins tool. You can no longer see what the prediction was for version 1, since version 2 is now operational. This is the usual procedure for upgrades of ethnicity breakdown tools, whether at FTDNA or 23andMe (I'm not sure, but suppose that Ancestry.com's DNA tool would be the same).

                GEDmatch.com has an FAQ page; check the "Learn More" section at the left after you've logged in. There are also links in that section for:
                • Using GEDmatch
                • GEDmatch Forums
                • GEDmatch Wiki

                Also, try
                I hope those may answer your questions.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am feeling a little bit like you, Tom.

                  I recently had my full-blood brother (but not a twin) tested, and he does not get the same "my Origins" breakdown as me.

                  We are both showing as just under 70% Eurpean (the rest is Ashkenazi/middle-eastern stuff - known and expected).

                  But his "European" includes 20% Scandinavian and 38% West and Central Europe; mine is ALL British Isles. I used to have Scandinavian, in Version 1, but it disappeared in Version 2. His test now has it!

                  I am also disappointed about the relative sizes of the databases. For my own tests, which were done years ago, Ancestry was not around at that time, but I wonder if I should have turned to them for recent tests of other family members.

                  I also wonder if Ancestry will ever allow reciprocal transfer of data.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have several groups of siblings tested, and there are several cases of siblings who have populations that their other sibling(s) don't, or they don't have what their siblings have (within the same population cluster, or in others). This was true in myOrigins vers. 1 and 2, although in different amounts and for different groups. It depends on what DNA they inherited from the same parent, which can vary a lot.

                    It's very unlikely that Ancestry would ever accept transfers. For one thing, they don't need to, and for another, FTDNA files would likely be incompatible. Ancestry is not likely to go to the trouble that FTDNA did, to devise a way to accept initially incompatible files. Ancestry's and 23andMe's earlier versions used to have many more SNPs tested which were the same as FTDNA's, but both companies changed in their recent chip versions to test more health-oriented SNPs. FTDNA does not test or report health results.

                    ISOGG.org has a nice table, "Autosomal DNA testing comparison chart," which you might find informative.

                    Comment

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