Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ancestry.com blog

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I think the likely reason Ancestry doesn't have an interest in having a chromosome browser is that they don't think a great many of their users can handle it. They may be right. Granted that shouldn't mean Ancestry shouldn't at least try. Having some sort of advanced tool in such a place on the site that the less informed won't feel overwhelmed but still have it there nonetheless would be ideal.

    Though most of the whining that was mentioned in this thread was more towards the recent cosmetic changes of Ancestry. I think another factor is some people see their screens differently than others. For example, some complain that the colors are hard to see. I don't have this vision problem but perhaps some of the older users have trouble with too much dark color in their backgrounds.

    I think this is a valid concern but is one that is hard to test for without having a specific group of users give feedback on it. It would have to be users with this type of problem since others won't be able to see the issue.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Jenny_Stephenson View Post
      Acceptable whining vs. silly whining:

      Change is inevitable, and people don't like having to think in new ways when user interfaces change, but some of the whining at AncestryDNA and 23andme is justifiable.

      The 23andme changeover to their new system is proving to be very clumsily managed-- with many people left dangling in the void-- still not transitioned to the new system and no timeline of when they might be transitioned , with vastly curtailed DNA comparison capabilities-- and a price increase of 50% for new kits.

      AncestryDNA users' most cherished desire is to have on onsite chromosome browser, and any other new bells and whistles receive scant praise if the chromosome browser issue is dead in the water. It's true that Ancestry.com has always said no chromosome browser, but in this day and age, why in the world adopt this research prohibitive stance? FTDNA managed to have an onsite chromosome browser without compromising users' privacy. Why can't Ancestry.com? Convincing matches to go that extra step and transfer to gedmatch to use the chromosome browser there is a tough sell. Inertia is the default.

      I think the frustration with AncestryDNA is this: it could be the near perfect Autosomal DNA testing site: huge atDNA database (which FTDNA does not have) + many matches who have extensive, public family trees (which neither 23andme nor FTDNA have); but for want of a nail--(chromosome browser)-- the kingdom was lost. AncestryDNA's usefulness to genealogical researchers will remain comparable to that of FTDNA and 23andme because of its shortsightedness.
      Thanks for a very reasonable and comprehensive critique of both 23andMe and AncestryDNA and why users may have legitimate complaints about them. That's a lot more useful than the post previous to yours in this thread that portrays anyone who complains about change as a whining Luddite!

      I've tested at all three companies, getting into the Family Finder database with an upload of my AncestryDNA raw data. So, I've experienced the pros and cons of each company. They all do have pros and cons.

      I have always regarded the analysis tools at 23andMe as the best of the three. Also, I have four 2nd cousins and three 3rd cousins who've tested at 23andMe, so I have the most ability to triangulate new matches there.

      However, it's become increasingly clear over the last two years that 23andMe cares very little about the research needs of genealogists and adoptees. With the doubling of their price and their taking away of useful genealogy/ancestry-oriented features in their "new experience" and various serious glitches associated with maintaining some customers in the "old experience" and new customers in the "new experience," I would advise genealogists and, especially, adoptees who only budget enough to test at one or two of the three companies to regard 23andMe as last on the list. Maybe when their database growth starts dwindling from their short-sighted slighting of genealogists and adoptees, they'll make some changes that benefit us. Until then, I can't recommend them, except to people who want to test at all three companies and who realize that they'll be frustrated by their experience at 23andMe.

      As far as AncestryDNA, I agree with you completely. Until they relent and give their customers a chromosome browser for better analysis through triangulation, they're letting down their customers.
      Last edited by MMaddi; 16 January 2016, 12:30 PM.

      Comment


      • #18
        I've used ancestry.com for about 6 years. I can still get a great deal done on the site with it changes. However, many of the changes make the workflow more inefficient and the quality of the new experience is still in the beta realm. The general design of the previous site was kinda "old" looking, but plenty of data was displayed in a logical and efficient manner.

        Then, they decided to make it more "mobile". The amount of whitespace around objects grew tremendously. Even without the extraneous sibling and parent vital dates that are inserted, I could see no more than half of the data I had been able to. The new "story" thing has many errors in it and is not something one can disable on a tree. There are valid complaints about it confusing visitors to one's tree. There's data there that is just plain wrong and never allowed by the tree owner.

        The mobile app is O.K., not great, but O.K. It is nice to show a quick overview, but not for serious records checking. The old website worked fine on an iPad. But now, many buttons no longer work and the suggestion is clear browser cache (which doesn't correct the issue) and install Chrome - a non-standard browser for iOS.

        The reasoning for killing FTM (which by many accounts is the most popular and regarded application of its type) is because "the desktop market is dying". Well, for serious genealogists, having a desktop app when you don't always have cloud access is essential. Also, FTM allows you to sync your online tree to your local computer. The sync process actually downloads all the records (census, etc.) so you now have a personal copy.

        Killing FTM will now make this process much harder. The 3rd-party API thing is just appeasement. Why kill a product until you have firm commitments in place to either create the successor or allow others to replace it?

        The chromosome browser thing (or lack thereof) is crazy. At least they could make it available in with a small subscription fee or something. Asking matches (who may not be technical at all) to migrate to gedmatch.com is mostly a non-starter. At least if you had a browser, you could look yourself.

        23andMe has totally ruined their website. They've added some reports (which are static) and completely screwed up the one part that (should) get more valuable over time. They are suffering from mobile-itis, too. The website is less than beta quality at this point.

        So, folks are starting to share less, privatizing their trees, deleting DNA results, no longer contributing to surveys, and ceasing to renew subscriptions. I've encountered this, personally.

        I am glad that FTDNA maintains its integrity by not succumbing to the dollar signs that such databases could garner to big-data entities. Hopefully, they will get increased business due to the changes in mission from the others.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
          I have always regarded the analysis tools at 23andMe as the best of the three. Also, I have four 2nd cousins and three 3rd cousins who've tested at 23andMe, so I have the most ability to triangulate new matches there.

          However, it's become increasingly clear over the last two years that 23andMe cares very little about the research needs of genealogists and adoptees. With the doubling of their price and their taking away of useful genealogy/ancestry-oriented features in their "new experience" and various serious glitches associated with maintaining some customers in the "old experience" and new customers in the "new experience," I would advise genealogists and, especially, adoptees who only budget enough to test at one or two of the three companies to regard 23andMe as last on the list. Maybe when their database growth starts dwindling from their short-sighted slighting of genealogists and adoptees, they'll make some changes that benefit us. Until then, I can't recommend them, except to people who want to test at all three companies and who realize that they'll be frustrated by their experience at 23andMe.

          As far as AncestryDNA, I agree with you completely. Until they relent and give their customers a chromosome browser for better analysis through triangulation, they're letting down their customers.
          I agree - 23andMe had the best tools (I have eight kits there). And, as an adoptee, I would regard them as last of the three to consider.

          Comment

          Working...
          X