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  • DNA Tests

    Reading some questions that have been put to FTDNA like: If I take a test with FTDNA and I take a test with Heritage DNA are they convertible to FTDNA answer :no, question why: are not both tests ending with the same results of I D ing a persons lineage?

  • #2
    "DNA Heritage’s lab did not use the same mtDNA panels that we do at Family Tree DNA. Therefore, Family Tree DNA cannot accept mtDNA test results from DNA Heritage."

    https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/...dna-transfers/

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    • #3
      The answer from the Family Tree DNA Learning Center is correct, but I wish it were a little bit more detailed

      If the entire mitochondrial DNA is tested the results are the same. However, such a test was introduced at $895 in 2005, and today (2015) it is $199. Cheaper tests that were testing only small portions of mtDNA, namely HVR1 & HVR2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervariable_region) were thus more popular.

      Heritage DNA named their test full, but it was not testing the entire mtDNA. The original website is gone, however a snapshot from 2010 is available at http://wayback.archive.org/web/20100....com/mtdna.asp. Oh, Heritage DNA named the regions that were being tested HVRI, HVRII and HVRIII... Approximately HVR1 ≈ HVRI and HVR2 ≈ HVRII + HVRIII.

      W.

      P.S. You may want to take a look at the comparison table http://www.isogg.org/wiki/MtDNA_test...mparison_chart, to see that full mtDNA testing is not that widespread.

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      • #4
        You did not id which test or tests you were asking about. If you have your raw data it may be possible to do limited comparisons,providing you can wade through the difference in terminology. If the subject of the DNA testing is available then retesting is the best option.

        The limited comparisons can mean that all the hidden statics used to declare confidence and genetic distance and time will not apply.

        Note it is very rare that "results of I D ing a persons lineage?" is the results of DNA tests. DNA tests all come with limits on accuracy and uncertainty of how two people are related.
        Last edited by stanjohn; 4 February 2015, 02:54 PM.

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        • #5
          Dumber

          A lot of this is as clear as mud, but let's see if I can explain whatever test I took, which was Y-DNA12, I asked to find my biological father's roots and the answer is I-M170- which is greek to me. so what was he, Japanese, Russian, Spanish-- What did I buy and why didn't they explain in English that this test does give you a definite answer as to who you are.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by anncortpoz View Post
            A lot of this is as clear as mud, but let's see if I can explain whatever test I took, which was Y-DNA12, I asked to find my biological father's roots and the answer is I-M170- which is greek to me. so what was he, Japanese, Russian, Spanish-- What did I buy and why didn't they explain in English that this test does give you a definite answer as to who you are.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_I-M170

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            • #7
              Originally posted by anncortpoz View Post
              A lot of this is as clear as mud, but let's see if I can explain whatever test I took, which was Y-DNA12, I asked to find my biological father's roots and the answer is I-M170- which is greek to me. so what was he, Japanese, Russian, Spanish-- What did I buy and why didn't they explain in English that this test does give you a definite answer as to who you are.
              Y-DNA12 is an extremely low level of precision. In fact, FTDNA does not offer it to new customers unless they order through a specific surname or geographical project.

              The truth is that to get a fairly definitive answer in the general case (e.g., a closed adoption), you need to:
              1) Order the Big Y (preferably when it is on sale at a discount);
              2) Get YFull's analysis of the raw data, which includes about 100 of FTDNA's standard 111 Y-STRs (markers);
              3) Scour FTDNA project spreadsheets to find your closest Y-STR matches who have known ethnic patrilineage, and ask them to order the Big Y and get YFull's analysis also;
              4) Count how many reliable "private" SNPs you each have (i.e., SNPs since your lineages diverged), and multiply the average by 140 (years per SNP) to get an estimate of your patrilineal TMRCA.

              The above is the general case. In specific cases, 67 markers (without a Big Y) may be enough to guess a surname!
              Last edited by lgmayka; 7 February 2015, 02:35 PM.

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              • #8
                I M170

                Originally posted by anncortpoz View Post
                A lot of this is as clear as mud, but let's see if I can explain whatever test I took, which was Y-DNA12, I asked to find my biological father's roots and the answer is I-M170- which is greek to me. so what was he, Japanese, Russian, Spanish-- What did I buy and why didn't they explain in English that this test does give you a definite answer as to who you are.
                I belong to Haplogroup I. Believe or not, Wikipedia actually has a pretty good description of this group. It is broken into two subgroups, I1 and I2. I1 is generally found at the highest frequencies in Scandinavian countries (in terms of modern populations) and I2, to which I belong, is found at the highest frequencies in the area of Bosnia and to a lesser extent in Germany (depending on which subgroup of I2 one belongs to). Eupedia also has a pretty decent page dedicated to I M170. That's a good place to start if you are new to this stuff. Of course, learning that one belongs to this haplogroup doesn't tell the whole story, because haplogroup assignment is based on the portion of a male's dna that is passed down from father to son without undergoing change (except for mutations).

                My assignment to I2 - a subgroup of I M170 - was predicted after I did the yDNA 12 marker str panel test and did not change after I paid for the "deep clade" test and upgraded to 67 markers, so even though the 12 marker test is not as precise as the others, assignment to a haplogroup based upon your 12 marker test is usually pretty accurate. My upgrades didn't really tell me anything about my haplogroup assignment that I didn't already know, except for an individual snp test that I ordered for about $30 after joining the Haplogroup I project and getting advice from administrators.
                Last edited by ekc123; 7 February 2015, 03:22 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by anncortpoz View Post
                  A lot of this is as clear as mud, but let's see if I can explain whatever test I took, which was Y-DNA12, I asked to find my biological father's roots and the answer is I-M170- which is greek to me. so what was he, Japanese, Russian, Spanish-- What did I buy and why didn't they explain in English that this test does give you a definite answer as to who you are.
                  If your father family had tested you may have some luck with, in my opinion appropriately named, the Family Finder test.

                  Even if they did not test yet, they may test some time in the future.

                  Family Finder test matches any not too distant relative that shares DNA with you, not only your father male line. So sometimes people might not be able to discriminate, whether a newly found cousin is related to them through their mother or father...

                  W.

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                  • #10
                    DNA

                    Talk about curves being thrown at a person, If I knew who my father was, would I really be asking WHO AM I?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by anncortpoz View Post
                      Talk about curves being thrown at a person, If I knew who my father was, would I really be asking WHO AM I?
                      It is not that complicated If you know your mother family, when you get a match in Family Finder, if it is not on your mother side, then it is on your father side.

                      W.

                      P.S. To help you with seeing from which side of your family a DNA match comes from, you may want to test some people from your mother family (closest are the best = your mother, her siblings etc.).

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