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I want to do the "Big Y," but...

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  • #16
    I ordered Big Y today - yeah!

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    • #17
      Blackson,

      Testing the Big Y or Full Genomes' Y is more economical than testing individual SNP's @ $39/SNP and can yield private or familial SNP's that could aid in IDing your father, eventually.

      With no matches beyond the 25 STR level, it is unlikely further testing of your Y will yield a match to a surname, but your extensive Y dataset could attract some interest that could lead to a match, eventually.

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      • #18
        I don't know about the comment that the Big Y giving you private and familial SNP's that can help find your father. In my opinion there is not enough coverage to help surname projects much less using it to find a father. In FTDNA's defense I don't think they are marketing it in this way but more to advanced users who want to learn more about their Y Chromosome. You've already done the tests most useful in finding a father the Y-DNA test and Family Finder. Most everyone that has taken the Big Y test have taken the STR Y-DNA tests so you're not fishing in a different pond so I can't see recommending a nearly $600 test for finding your father when the tests you have already taken would suffice.

        My closest Big Y match shares 57 of 59 Novel Variants so he is only off by 2 from me. They don't let you compare STR's and STR's are not included in this test but I looked my "match" up on his surname project and he only matches me 50/67 in STR's. So not even close to being related and is probably "related" a couple thousand years ago or more and I only have 2 Novel Variants off from him (R-Z2). So this test doesn't appear to be helpful for surname projects which was my hope. Maybe in a few years they will come up with the technology to give us a Full Y or nearly Full Y with all the STRs and then we might have something but this test is not much use for projects for branching etc. unless you want more information on what haplogroup a lineage belongs to.

        If you are interested in more information on your Y Chromosome for curiosity sake and academic reasons it is a good test but otherwise I would just wait patiently for close matches in the tests you've already taken. Be sure to upload you Y-DNA results to Y-Search and ancestry.com (ancestry's Y-DNA database goes away Sep. 5th) and also SMGF to see if you get any close matches with those that didn't test at FTDNA.

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        • #19
          SMGF went out of existence a few years ago when all the records, and I believe all the samples, were sent to Ancestry. That's part of the reason why the proposed destruction of the samples and the removal of the STR results by Ancestry is so egregious.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by vinnie View Post
            SMGF went out of existence a few years ago when all the records, and I believe all the samples, were sent to Ancestry. That's part of the reason why the proposed destruction of the samples and the removal of the STR results by Ancestry is so egregious.
            The DNA samples from SMGF are not affected. I checked this with an Ancestry employee who was formerly with SMGF.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by travers View Post
              In my opinion there is not enough coverage to help surname projects much less using it to find a father.
              The Big Y yields roughly one SNP per 150 years of patrilineal history. That may or may not be helpful for genealogical work.

              Moreover, professional analysis by YFull or FullGenomes (for about $50) can glean over 400 Y-STRs from the BAM file (raw-raw data) of the Big Y. Unfortunately, we don't have mutation rates for most of those, but they still may be useful for genealogical purposes.
              Originally posted by travers View Post
              My closest Big Y match shares 57 of 59 Novel Variants so he is only off by 2 from me. They don't let you compare STR's and STR's are not included in this test but I looked my "match" up on his surname project and he only matches me 50/67 in STR's.
              That is certainly unusual, to say the least. Have you asked for your BAM file and submitted it to YFull for professional analysis?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
                The Big Y yields roughly one SNP per 150 years of patrilineal history. That may or may not be helpful for genealogical work.

                Moreover, professional analysis by YFull or FullGenomes (for about $50) can glean over 400 Y-STRs from the BAM file (raw-raw data) of the Big Y. Unfortunately, we don't have mutation rates for most of those, but they still may be useful for genealogical purposes.

                That is certainly unusual, to say the least. Have you asked for your BAM file and submitted it to YFull for professional analysis?
                No, I haven't done any further analysis on my results. Thank you for the one SNP per 150 stat I was wondering what the average should be. All my Big Y matches are not even close on STRs to me which makes me wonder if I have an accurate Novel Variant list and if they are missing quite a few.

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                • #23
                  Just correcting myself. I didn't realize the Big Y matching is based on "Known SNP" difference not shared or unshared Novel Variants. So it's just based off of known SNPs that are part of the most current haplotree I take it. I have 105 Novel Variants, and out of my "matches" the closest shares only 59 of these. Some of my Novel Variants are medium confidence so I don't know if these are counted or not.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by travers View Post
                    So it's just based off of known SNPs that are part of the most current haplotree I take it.
                    Not just SNPs on the current haplotree -- there are many Known SNPs in BigY that haven't been placed on the tree (yet), and those are included in Big Y matching too.

                    Elise

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