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Explanation of changes in My Origins v. 3

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  • Explanation of changes in My Origins v. 3

    There is much grumbling about the changes between My Origins v.2 and V.3. Many of us have felt rather uprooted by the changes. Could FamilyTreeDNA please explain the rationale that turns formerly British Isles origins into Central Europeans, and many other such changes. Many of us in the US trace our ancestral roots back to the countries from which our ancestors migrated to America, and the new version 3 seems to go back to a point where, for example, the Anglo Saxons were living in Germany. Where could I find more information?

  • #2
    I read at some other site (not sure where) that FTDNA will release a myOrigins Methodology Whitepaper about myOrigins 3.0, one would hope in the near future. This should be true, as they did it for myOrigins 2.0. I found a link to the whitepaper for myOrigins 1.0 in 2014 saved at the Web Archive (courtesy of Debbie Kennett's blog), and also a 2017 update (perhaps for myOrigins 2.0?) which you could check for an example of what to expect. The 2017 update does not include as much information as the 2014 version, but does show an increased list of reference populations. We can expect a myOrigins 3.0 Methodology Whitepaper to update the reference populations accordingly, and perhaps describe the rationale for the new population clusters.
    Last edited by KATM; 11 October 2020, 04:39 PM.

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    • #3
      In the email I got saying my updated information was ready, there was a link to a family tree dna blog which had an article talking about the new my origins 3, and in the section on reference populations it gave an example of lumping people in together if all four of their grandparents were born in the same place. I'm not sure if that indicates that FTDNA built their algorithm that way, but I certainly hope not because all four grandparents really doesn't get it: what if one of them was born to expatriate parents?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jeff H View Post
        There is much grumbling about the changes between My Origins v.2 and V.3. Many of us have felt rather uprooted by the changes. Could FamilyTreeDNA please explain the rationale that turns formerly British Isles origins into Central Europeans, and many other such changes. Many of us in the US trace our ancestral roots back to the countries from which our ancestors migrated to America, and the new version 3 seems to go back to a point where, for example, the Anglo Saxons were living in Germany. Where could I find more information?
        Along with those who grumble there are many who are very happy.

        Have your read all of the information here: https://learn.familytreedna.com/fami...tion-clusters/ and the FAQs here: https://learn.familytreedna.com/auto...ked-questions/

        Did you know "myOrigins results are your personal genetic ancestry that reflects the last 100 to 2,000 years (about four to 80 generations). They may also reflect one population that mixed with another in ancient times and became fixed in one of your populations." I don't know where my ancestors live 2,000 years ago. Do you?

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        • #5
          I'm not happy with the description of myOrigins (any version) as representing "your personal genetic ancestry that reflects the last 100 to 2,000 years (about four to 80 generations)". That's just bogus. What it represents is the degree to which your DNA is similar to that of various statistically-derived "reference groups" made up of modern, and probably almost entirely still living people who claim ancestry from a particular place and who are, within a reference group, more or less similar to each other. We have no way of knowing how long the ancestors of these reference people lived in any particular area, nor even if, for the most part, those ancestors actually lived in the same place 100 to 2,000 years ago. The only way we are going to know the genetic make-up of the population of, say, France 500 years ago, is to dig up a very large sample of datable bones, sequence their DNA, and also check for isotope markers to be sure they really are the bones of people who grew up in the same area where their bones were found.

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          • #6
            Let's add this article to the collection, to keep info in one place. The official ftdna blog:

            https://blog.familytreedna.com/myorigins-3-is-here/

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