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Most Common Surnames

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  • #31
    OK, I Googled Col. Wade and got some poop. Thomas Wade 1722-1786. He was Colonel of the NC Militia. He married Mary Jane Boggan. I didn't see anything in the information given that looks like he's related to my ancestress Charity. So I won't jump to conclusions unless I see other info, etc.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
      OK, I Googled Col. Wade and got some poop. Thomas Wade 1722-1786. He was Colonel of the NC Militia. He married Mary Jane Boggan. I didn't see anything in the information given that looks like he's related to my ancestress Charity. So I won't jump to conclusions unless I see other info, etc.
      I don't like just talking to myself all the time. But no one in my family is interested in our lineage. My only immediate family member, my sister, thinks I ought to recognize my NPE German son as really mine. And My cousins don't like me. So that's the end of that.

      As for Charity, about 1760-1831, she still seems somewhat connected to Thomas Wade, even if not biologically. They knew one another back then. They may have gone to the same (Presbyterian?) church in Anson County, NC. The female names of Lydia and Jane are not accounted for. That is, they pop up unexpectedly within a couple of generations downstream. They could be in honor of the Thomas Wade family, etc etc.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
        As for Charity, about 1760-1831, she still seems somewhat connected to Thomas Wade, even if not biologically. They knew one another back then. They may have gone to the same (Presbyterian?) church in Anson County, NC. The female names of Lydia and Jane are not accounted for. That is, they pop up unexpectedly within a couple of generations downstream. They could be in honor of the Thomas Wade family, etc etc.
        Nov 9th
        Thomas Wade married Mary/Sarah Jane Boggan, apparently using Jane as her everyday name. She was the daughter of Sir(?) Walter Boggan and Lydia O'Rorie Moore. All 3 of them were born in Ireland (Castle Finn, Donegal). If I have a connection with my direct maternal line, it would have to be via one of Jane's brothers, as she was the only daughter.

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        • #34
          I have never done any research on the English Hamptons or the Wade family they married into, since I know from my cousin's Y-DNA test that we belong to the Scottish lineage. I just wish I knew if I have enough DNA evidence to be considered proof that my 4th great-grandfather was Oliver Hampton. I asked the question in another thread here a few months ago and everyone ignored my post. I'm thinking of posting at 23andMe to see if I get any response there.

          I just learned that my 2nd great-grandfather, James W. Hampton, published a book of poetry around 1900. I think it must have been very poor poetry. I've contacted libraries and historical societies and no one has a copy. There isn't a single reference to such a book on the web. The newspaper articles that refer to it never mention its title. I'd love to get my hands on a copy just in case it was prefaced with a biographical sketch mentioning his grandparents!

          My genealogy program has been discontinued so I'm trying to move 15 years of work to a new program.

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          • #35
            Just wondering

            Have you attempted to contact the Shoals Republican newspaper in Indiana to see if they had any kind of archive containing old newspapers which might contain more information about his book?

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            • #36
              My mother turned out to be an enemy of my family tree stuff. I was an unwanted pregancy, and she took life-long revenge. My paternal grandfather wrote copious verse/poetry. But where is it now? Many old photos have completely disappeared. Old newspapers from the 1930s are not there. Info about her side of the family were squelched. When we moved down to Florida and my dad deserted us, we kids were completely isolated from relatives. She refused to talk about our family tree, although I was very interested. So now I'm relying on Ancestry and FTDNA to clarify.

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              • #37
                Hey, I just noticed that I too now have that most common names strip at the top of my matches. It shows 5 each of Brown, Smith, and Pike. That doesn't look very helpful.

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                • #38
                  Most Common Surnames

                  Well, like everything else I'm sure I'll start using it and this is likely to be tinkered with. I'd like to know the criteria though.

                  I now have 40 pages of matches and I'm sure there are some which I haven't even looked at, so potentially this might be useful. However, the names we have are most likely the ones we know the most about whereas the mystery names remain just that - mysteries, possibly because of a name change or a spelling variation. I have confirmed a connection between my Burleton and my cousin's Burliston which go back in 1700 to Burlington.

                  I would like an explanation of the numbers. Apparently my two most common names are Smith at 5 and Jones at 4. Neither appear in my tree so obviously this is across my matches' listed names. However, a quick search of Smith shows 63 matches with Smith in their list.

                  Sorting by surname, I can see that this is it. I have five matches surnamed Smith and four surnamed Jones.

                  I don't like to be negative, but I must admit I don't see any point at all in this. FtDNA is a site which allows pseudonyms - or used to, maybe this has changed. Smith and Jones are going to be common pseudonym choices, surely? Not to mention the married name issue which has already been pointed out.

                  But maybe this is just phase one to test the position on the page and to test the rollout before it is applied to the more useful fields?

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                  • #39
                    Burlington ^ may refer to New Jersey. Both Quakers and settlers (including Presbyterians) from Long Island and elsewhere in New England moved there in the late 1600s and early 1700s when it was opened up. Jones is a typical Welsh surname, although probably not limited to Wales. As for Pike in my names, at least 3 of those are from Newfoundland (Canada). So I don't think Pike is a clue for my direct maternal line. And so it goes...

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                    • #40
                      I just noticed it showed up on my 2 accounts as well. However, I know it is not correct as I have over 1000 matches with a lot of Cohen's and my tope matches say "5 Smiths, 7 Friedman's (interesting as I have no Friedman's in my surnames that I know if) and 7 Grossman's ( Very interesting as my great- uncle married a Grossman from the same small shtetl that my family is from so maybe we are actually related by blood). But I know that I have many Brown's and Brookers and Barkers, etc listed in surnames so I wonder if it is just not picking them up?

                      My mom's list also has Friedman listed but in a higher amount than mine and she has Cohen which makes sense since my ggrandmother's family were "ha Cohen's"- and it is a common name. She also has the name Kaplan which we do not have in our tree.

                      I am curious what other Jewish folks have listed as their top surnames ? I imagine Cohen is a top contender but besides that....?

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                      • #41
                        Most Common Surnames

                        I have now noticed that if I select a match and view 'In Common Withs', the names at the top change so it only applies to the specific selection. If it applied to my match's ancestor surnames rather than my match's own surnames, this could be rather useful.

                        I believe there was talk of populating the surname list from the family trees. If this is done, and this name count was applied to those names, it could be useful as a hint to a common name between the matches which could then be researched to find a link to my own tree. Hopefully this is where FtDNA are eventually going with this feature?

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                        • #42
                          On this Veterans Day I might mention some glorious/glamorous military names show up in surname lists given by some of my FF matches. I forget some of them, but I do recall Patton and Wainwright.
                          Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 12 November 2014, 01:11 AM.

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                          • #43
                            I had better hide the above military-related post before the left-wingers come after me. Now that I've (temporarily?) settled on a Covington ancestral line for my direct maternal ancestress, I poked a bit more into Sarah Newman (c.1720-c.1760), her mother. It's basically a brick wall there in colonial eastern shore Maryland. But I've (temporarily?) settled on a Virginia origin, and not the other Newman in the wider area. A possible grandmother of Sarah was Mary Bull from England; that is if she married John Newman of Buckinghamshire.
                            Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 14 November 2014, 03:47 PM.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                              I had better hide the above military-related post before the left-wingers come after me. Now that I've (temporarily?) settled on a Covington ancestral line for my direct maternal ancestress, I poked a bit more into Sarah Newman (c.1720-c.1760), her mother. It's basically a brick wall there in colonial eastern shore Maryland. But I've (temporarily?) settled on a Virginia origin, and not the other Newman in the wider area. A possible grandmother of Sarah was Mary Bull from England; that is if she married John Newman of Buckinghamshire.
                              I'll wrap my two cents worth up by making a correction. Firstly, I still don't know for sure if I'm on the right track with the Covington line. But in case it's the right line, for my direct maternal line, I'll share a discovery. Sarah Newman apparently is really Sarah Newnam. I haven't found her father, but she has a sister on record, born 1718, as marrying William Calvin. From what I can glean from online, that Calvin tribe is at least partly Huguenot, via Ireland. I don't know about the Newnam line, except I saw online a Newnam in London around the same time frame.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by larzus View Post
                                I have now noticed that if I select a match and view 'In Common Withs', the names at the top change so it only applies to the specific selection. If it applied to my match's ancestor surnames rather than my match's own surnames, this could be rather useful.

                                I believe there was talk of populating the surname list from the family trees. If this is done, and this name count was applied to those names, it could be useful as a hint to a common name between the matches which could then be researched to find a link to my own tree. Hopefully this is where FtDNA are eventually going with this feature?
                                Since I'm still only getting the surnames of matches rather than names of people on my tree, I'm still wondering where FTDNA is going with this feature? Can anyone tell us what's it's point or purpose??? Last time I tried to figure out what was going on with it, the site placed a call to "Houston, we have a problem."

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