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  • #16
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    My children are all at college here in Ireland and while their is some reference to the Celts in their history classes they are not taught that they are descended from the Celts.
    http://www.yourirish.com/history/ancient/mesolithic/

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      My children are all at college here in Ireland and while their is some reference to the Celts in their history classes they are not taught that they are descended from the Celts.
      I'll have to ask my other son what he was taught about the original population as he has finished with school entirely and is currently living in Amsterdam. I doubt it was much different than the current, "We don't know."

      Naturally, there is reference to the Celts in Ireland. An afternoon at the National History Museum will tell you that without ever opening a book. There is also a Viking exhibit at the Museum and the Fishamble area makes it clear there was once a sizable Viking population. As I live in Dub, and on the sea, we are very aware of different peoples coming and going over the millennia, some of whom stayed and settled. The marks have been left on our names, faces and DNA.

      I would like to believe there are pockets of original tomb builder dna remaining, somewhere, that are less admixed than the rest of Ireland. Perhaps, in the west. Thus, my interest in the abstract you posted. Otherwise, I would suggest that the rest of us are fairly admixed (my own family in particular, as we have a high percentage of Scandinavian).

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      • #18
        Originally posted by suttonwho View Post
        I'll have to ask my other son what he was taught about the original population as he has finished with school entirely and is currently living in Amsterdam. I doubt it was much different than the current, "We don't know."

        Naturally, there is reference to the Celts in Ireland. An afternoon at the National History Museum will tell you that without ever opening a book. There is also a Viking exhibit at the Museum and the Fishamble area makes it clear there was once a sizable Viking population. As I live in Dub, and on the sea, we are very aware of different peoples coming and going over the millennia, some of whom stayed and settled. The marks have been left on our names, faces and DNA.

        I would like to believe there are pockets of original tomb builder dna remaining, somewhere, that are less admixed than the rest of Ireland. Perhaps, in the west. Thus, my interest in the abstract you posted. Otherwise, I would suggest that the rest of us are fairly admixed (my own family in particular, as we have a high percentage of Scandinavian).
        "Secrets of the Stones is about understanding our past our faith and our destiny. Ireland is unique in that it was the last place in Europe to be populated. However the discoveries from using cutting edge science is re-writing Irish History. Ireland has nearly 150,000 ancient monuments. In 1977 on the west coast of Ireland 30 kilos of human bones where found in tombs which where built nearly 6000 years ago making them the oldest tombs in Ireland and proving that Ireland was inhabited way before suggested."
        http://www.rte.ie/tv/secretsofthestones/

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        • #19
          I'm not sure if your reply was intended to be directed at me 1798. I am well aware of the widespread nature of monuments large and small. We picnic at one just up the road in a farmer's field. They are everywhere. Nor do I think the Vikings or Celts built them. As I have already mentioned, we do not know why they were built. The origins of the original population are still being studied and determined. Bravo, science.

          I thought you might get a laugh at this, 1798. I asked my youngest child what he knew about the Celts and if anyone in school had ever told him that is where the Irish came from. He said no, all he knew off the top of his head about them in Ireland was that they, "sat around and made jewelry." I lol'd.

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