Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Y-DNA records database stats

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Y-DNA records database stats

    I've been watching the number of Y-DNA records increase on the home page, and was able to get an idea of throughput rate, as follows:

    1,436 records added from May 4th to May 20th.

    Average number of Y-DNA records added per day:

    From May 4th to 12th: 38.25 per day
    From May 4th to 15th: 57.09 per day
    From May 4th to 20th: 89.75 per day

    The average per day is increasing, so that's a good thing.

    (Just trying to pass the time)

    Paul

  • #2
    Update:

    From May 4th to 12th: 38.25 per day
    From May 4th to 15th: 57.09 per day
    From May 4th to 20th: 89.75 per day
    From May 4th to 25th: 128.38 per day

    Comment


    • #3
      Keep in mind that those statistics almost certainly include any Genographic participants who "forward" their data into FTDNA's regular database.

      Comment


      • #4
        good point.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes the database keeps growing but I'm still stuck at two 22/25 matches with a couple of Brit guys.
          Not a great result for a R1b

          C'mon I WANT TO MATCH SOMEONE!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Me too!

            F.E.C., I'm in the same situation... I'm also R1b, well, R1b1c so far, and only have a 22/25 with a Brit. Seems to be common.... But then, since I was born in Romania and not many tested from there, it will take a long time until I might get a "better" match.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Dan,

              since I don't have any match in Romania, I can't see on my RAO page how many DNA samples from your country they tested, though I can guess they're not many.
              On the contrary I can see that 842 people of Italian descent got tested (plus almost 100 from Sicily,which apparently is not considered as part of Italy by a lot of people ) and I understand that a good portion of them is R1b, still I have no match from my own country even at 11/12. I find it a bit frustrating.

              However, you are Romanian; maybe you're one of those rare R1b individuals whose ancestor overwintered in SE Europe 12.000 years ago (?)

              Comment


              • #8
                DNA - a hope to solving mysteries

                Originally posted by F.E.C.
                Hi Dan,

                since I don't have any match in Romania, I can't see on my RAO page how many DNA samples from your country they tested, though I can guess they're not many. On the contrary I can see that 842 people of Italian descent got tested (plus almost 100 from Sicily,which apparently is not considered as part of Italy by a lot of people ) and I understand that a good portion of them is R1b, still I have no match from my own country even at 11/12. I find it a bit frustrating.

                However, you are Romanian; maybe you're one of those rare R1b individuals whose ancestor overwintered in SE Europe 12.000 years ago (?)
                Hi F.E.C.,

                Well, the beauty of this ongoing project is to finally shed some light on all kinds of mysteries. The very formation of the Romanian people is one such mystery, never ellucidated to a satisfactory level (although many Romanians would probably like to disagree on this).

                The official version over there is that after the kingdom of Dacia was destroyed and annexed to the Roman Empire in 107 AD the Roman troops brought colonists who spoke a Latinized language and over the next centuries they spoke "vulgar Latin", which became the basis of modern Romanian language, a Romance language by structure and grammar, in spite of many Slavic (but not only) words in vocabulary by late 19th century. Modernity made the language remove some of the old Slavic words, due to the importation of Anglo-French new words, which themselves have Anglo-Saxon-Latin roots. It has been argued that after 271 AD, when the Roman Empire withdrew its administration and army from Dacia (more or less Romania today), the Latinized people continued to survive waves of Goths, Huns, Gepids, Avars, Slavs, Bulgars, Hungarians, Pechenegs, Kumans, Tartars and utltimately Ottoman Turks. Simply put, this is the "Daco-Roman continuity theory."

                An oposing theory claims that Romanians/Vlachs first formed in the Balkans, citing similarities with the Albanian language and the close ties with the Bulgarian and Byzantine Orthodox churches, through which they became Christians. By the 13th century they are found pushing north of the Danube, spreading in a radial fashion, from the Carpathian mountains to hills and then valleys. The Hungarians claim that only after the 18th century the Romanians formed a relative majority in Transylvania, growing to become an absolute majority shortly after. When the Goths were given Dacia in 271 AD, about 1 million of them settled there. Nevertheless, the Huns pushed them out later and the Goths spread south all the way to Balkans, Italy, Spain and Northern Africa.

                But even if one accepts the continuity theory, who were the Latin speaking colonists? They were without any doubt drawn from all the corners of the Roman Empire, as soldiers and then "veterans" landed after performing service and duties to the Emperor. Genetically speaking, those people had to have mixed backgrounds. One could have been born in Britain, another in Italy, yet another in Syria or Egypt (archaeology found all kinds of pagan deities and places of origin for these settlers, prior to Christianity). I suspect a genetical map of Romania would one day provide quite an interesting view. And I believe the whole area of the Roman Empire might yieald similar results. Populations shifted, were deported for strategic reasons, entered into the army, moved with the troops, got settled somewhere else, inter-married with locals, etc. An ancient melting pot! I assume there must be even a lot of Jewish blood in this mixture, because Jerusalem was destroyed around 70 AD (just 37 years before Dacia was conquered and settled), the Jews being expelled and scattered all over the map of the Roman Empire.

                Regarding the number of people who tested in Romania, I saw somewhere 207 tests for the Y-DNA side. Not too many, because it is not cheap for them to shell out a few hundred dollars, plus they might not even know about it. The matches that I have so far are not surprising given the extent of the Roman Empire, except perhaps a 22/25 match that could be somewhat stepping out of that pattern, but it is still inconclusive, since it deals with probabilities and no paper trail.
                Last edited by 29149; 26 June 2006, 12:05 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  RAO matches

                  Originally posted by F.E.C.
                  Hi Dan,

                  since I don't have any match in Romania, I can't see on my RAO page how many DNA samples from your country they tested, though I can guess they're not many.
                  On the contrary I can see that 842 people of Italian descent got tested (plus almost 100 from Sicily,which apparently is not considered as part of Italy by a lot of people ) and I understand that a good portion of them is R1b, still I have no match from my own country even at 11/12. I find it a bit frustrating.

                  However, you are Romanian; maybe you're one of those rare R1b individuals whose ancestor overwintered in SE Europe 12.000 years ago (?)
                  I forgot to mention to you that I don't have on my RAO page any single DNA sample from Romania.

                  Only on the mtDNA I have Romania mentioned once (here things are more interesting as I have four high-res matches pointing to some Most Common Ancestors in Greece about 600-800 years ago: three high-res matches to Greece and one to Sicily; there's an obvious Greek connection here!)

                  I am waiting on some SNP tests and somehow expect to be R1b1c7 (all I know for the time being is that I am R1b1c) because that would bring me closer to "only" 4,000 years ago...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dan Draghici
                    Hi F.E.C.,



                    But even if one accepts the continuity theory, who were the Latin speaking colonists? They were without any doubt drawn from all the corners of the Roman Empire, as soldiers and then "veterans" landed after performing service and duties to the Emperor. Genetically speaking, those people had to have mixed backgrounds. One could have been born in Britain, another in Italy, yet another in Syria or Egypt (archaeology found all kinds of pagan deities and places of origin for these settlers, prior to Christianity). I suspect a genetical map of Romania would one day provide quite an interesting view. And I believe the whole area of the Roman Empire might yieald similar results. Populations shifted, were deported for strategic reasons, entered into the army, moved with the troops, got settled somewhere else, inter-married with locals, etc. An ancient melting pot! I assume there must be even a lot of Jewish blood in this mixture, because Jerusalem was destroyed around 70 AD (just 37 years before Dacia was conquered and settled), the Jews being expelled and scattered all over the map of the Roman Empire.
                    .

                    NICE TRY
                    but no prize
                    rome was founded like most of the city states by the first exodus out of eygpt by the rulers the sons of zarah. who were hebrew. . then the babylonians migrated there.
                    the gods of the city states were based on the sons of Jacob. thats why temple tools had them on their faces much to the shigrin of modern day jews who forget.
                    rome conquered hebrew people and we are supprized the genes are hebrew.
                    much to the contrary most of rome and greece where hebrew while northern europe were keltoi again hebrew. gaul was settled by the sons of geale who was in the desert with moses.lol

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jim Denning
                      NICE TRY
                      but no prize
                      rome was founded like most of the city states by the first exodus out of eygpt by the rulers the sons of zarah. who were hebrew. . then the babylonians migrated there.
                      the gods of the city states were based on the sons of Jacob. thats why temple tools had them on their faces much to the shigrin of modern day jews who forget.
                      rome conquered hebrew people and we are supprized the genes are hebrew.
                      much to the contrary most of rome and greece where hebrew while northern europe were keltoi again hebrew. gaul was settled by the sons of geale who was in the desert with moses.lol
                      this belongs in dna and geneaology forum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Supposed to be that some Sarmation tribes moved into the general Romanian area. Have one RAO 2-step 12 marker match in Romania, also one 1-step 12 marker match each for Croatia & Armenia ...(Haplogroup G & G2).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ragnar
                          Supposed to be that some Sarmation tribes moved into the general Romanian area. Have one RAO 2-step 12 marker match in Romania, also one 1-step 12 marker match each for Croatia & Armenia ...(Haplogroup G & G2).
                          Hi ragnar,

                          Everything is possible, but 1-2 step mutations from 12 markers gives very little insight. Even at 25 markers it is still a chance, unless it is a perfect match.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X