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Old 12th November 2016, 07:48 AM
Standisher Standisher is offline
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Location: Lancashire
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Is FTDNA "British" the same as "Celtic"

I had an updated 37 marker test, autosomal and family finder undertaken last year. I had the following results.

69% British and Irish
13% Scandinavian
16% Western and Central European
2% Middle Eastern

Can someone tell me what weight I should put on the "British and Irish". Does "British" mean Anglo-Saxon and Irish "Celtic" or is the term more of a catchall. British and Irish feels too broad a term.

I also wonder what the 16% Western European could mean. Could anyone advise.
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Old 12th November 2016, 09:09 AM
clintonslayton76 clintonslayton76 is offline
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Basis for explanations

Most origin estimates are based on markers found in current population testers and compared to "ancient" results. British and Irish simply reflects findings in the Isles, while Western and Central European are continental results. The Scandinavian countries have some specific concentrations. An Asian prediction could mean either "oriental" or AmerIndian.

This is about as close as FTDNA can get with their algorithms, based on autosomal DNA, and maximally confusing is that your YDNA cannot generate such estimates, except that certain haplotypes are associated with certain locations. R and I are considered European, but J is estimated to be "Mediterranean," E and A are "African," as examples. But cultural or physical predictions cannot result from YDNA, since it remains constant for 1000s or years. Autosomal DNA is inconstant, every mixture is "new."

Since these origins cannot always reflect the myriad of migration theories among scientists, they are interesting but not solid AIM markers to be taken too seriously. The same findings may be reported much differently by another service.
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Old 20th November 2016, 10:59 PM
kevinduffy kevinduffy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Standisher View Post
I had an updated 37 marker test, autosomal and family finder undertaken last year. I had the following results.

69% British and Irish
13% Scandinavian
16% Western and Central European
2% Middle Eastern

Can someone tell me what weight I should put on the "British and Irish". Does "British" mean Anglo-Saxon and Irish "Celtic" or is the term more of a catchall. British and Irish feels too broad a term.

I also wonder what the 16% Western European could mean. Could anyone advise.
In this context, "British" likely refers to pre-Anglo-Saxon which is often interpreted as Celtic. Western and Central European likely refers to Germanic or Anglo-Saxon.
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