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Old 9th April 2018, 07:37 PM
josh w. josh w. is offline
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Originally Posted by ALASMI View Post
Understanding the timing and character of the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa is critical for inferring the colonization and admixture processes that underpin global population history. It has been argued that dispersal out of Africa had an early phase, particularly ~130–90 thousand years ago (ka), that reached only the East Mediterranean Levant, and a later phase, ~60–50 ka, that extended across the diverse environments of Eurasia to Sahul. However, recent findings from East Asia and Sahul challenge this model. Here we show that H. sapiens was in the Arabian Peninsula before 85 ka. We describe the Al Wusta-1 (AW-1) intermediate phalanx from the site of Al Wusta in the Nefud desert, Saudi Arabia. AW-1 is the oldest directly dated fossil of our species outside Africa and the Levant. The palaeoenvironmental context of Al Wusta demonstrates that H. sapiens using Middle Palaeolithic stone tools dispersed into Arabia during a phase of increased precipitation driven by orbital forcing, in association with a primarily African fauna. A Bayesian model incorporating independent chronometric age estimates indicates a chronology for Al Wusta of ~95–86 ka, which we correlate with a humid episode in the later part of Marine Isotope Stage 5 known from various regional records. Al Wusta shows that early dispersals were more spatially and temporally extensive than previously thought. Early H. sapiens dispersals out of Africa were not limited to winter rainfall-fed Levantine Mediterranean woodlands immediately adjacent to Africa, but extended deep into the semi-arid grasslands of Arabia, facilitated by periods of enhanced monsoonal rainfall.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s415...7-c57bc9392b75

Yes, the record of that period is not well understood. Modern humans have been in the Levant (Skhul-Israel) for over a 100,000 years. Arabic remains of that period would not be a surprise. The question is whether they left a legacy up to the present.
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Old 9th April 2018, 08:43 PM
dna dna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALASMI View Post
Understanding the timing and character of the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa is critical for inferring the colonization and admixture processes that underpin global population history. It has been argued that dispersal out of Africa had an early phase, particularly ~130–90 thousand years ago (ka), that reached only the East Mediterranean Levant, and a later phase, ~60–50 ka, that extended across the diverse environments of Eurasia to Sahul. However, recent findings from East Asia and Sahul challenge this model. Here we show that H. sapiens was in the Arabian Peninsula before 85 ka. We describe the Al Wusta-1 (AW-1) intermediate phalanx from the site of Al Wusta in the Nefud desert, Saudi Arabia. AW-1 is the oldest directly dated fossil of our species outside Africa and the Levant. The palaeoenvironmental context of Al Wusta demonstrates that H. sapiens using Middle Palaeolithic stone tools dispersed into Arabia during a phase of increased precipitation driven by orbital forcing, in association with a primarily African fauna. A Bayesian model incorporating independent chronometric age estimates indicates a chronology for Al Wusta of ~95–86 ka, which we correlate with a humid episode in the later part of Marine Isotope Stage 5 known from various regional records. Al Wusta shows that early dispersals were more spatially and temporally extensive than previously thought. Early H. sapiens dispersals out of Africa were not limited to winter rainfall-fed Levantine Mediterranean woodlands immediately adjacent to Africa, but extended deep into the semi-arid grasslands of Arabia, facilitated by periods of enhanced monsoonal rainfall.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-018-0518-2
Tonight, I came to the forum with a very different purpose, but spent over an hour reading upon this interesting discovery. Thank you ALASMI !

Although my library does not subscribe to Nature Ecology & Evolution, I have read reviews that were published simultaneously and browsed through 100+ pages of the supplementary material.

Three things are clear
  • no DNA whatsoever is possible,
  • the authors took great care to prove the age of the found finger bones,
  • and that the finger bones are Homo sapiens.


I guess we might never learn the true nature of ancient migrations, since the further we move in time either there are no fossils or the fossils found are more and more mineralized. The latter means that even with new discoveries we might not be able to determine whether a particular population contributed to ancestry of modern humans or that population vanished without leaving behind any genetic footprint. And even more so in determining cultural or economical legacy of that population. (OK, I do not know much about the Arabian Peninsula. However, I am assuming that ancient populations there could potentially be like European populations that suddenly vanished due to some disease or a natural disaster, or gradually vanished with a climate change like Norse Greenlanders did.)


Mr. W.
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