Go Back   Family Tree DNA Forums > General Interest > DNA and Genealogy for Beginners

DNA and Genealogy for Beginners Everything you wanted to know about DNA and Genealogy but didn't know where to ask. This board is open to customers and visitors.

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 4th May 2012, 04:57 PM
Swennilsson Swennilsson is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 80
AncestryDNA

Yesterday I received an email introducing the new autosomal dna test offered by Ancestry.com. So far it is unclear to me whether this new service from Ancestry.com does anything over and above what FTDNA's FamilyFinder does. Does anyone else have more information on this?
  #2  
Old 4th May 2012, 05:24 PM
Jomid59 Jomid59 is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Earth
Posts: 143
At $99 it's a lot cheaper than FF. Guess that is the buying power of having a large customer base.

Don't you just love advertisers watch the video, I like the way they slip in "with billions of records".

How it works:
"comprehensively looks at the entire genome at over 700,000 locations"

Entire genome? impressive!

The written word is truly wonderful.

Last edited by Jomid59; 4th May 2012 at 05:28 PM.
  #3  
Old 4th May 2012, 06:39 PM
katerennie4 katerennie4 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 295
I just hope FTDNA doesn't get pushed out of the business of DNA testing. I realize they are all businesses, but I just wish Ancestry would stick to records & let FTDNA do what they do best. Although, I am a very "share and share alike" person.
  #4  
Old 4th May 2012, 08:43 PM
MMaddi MMaddi is offline
yDNA: R-CTS2509; mtDNA: T2e
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 3,391
According to CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogy blogger, Ancestry.com's autosomal DNA test will not provide customers with the chromosome number and location of matching segments. See http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.co...-notes-on.html An update of her description of the test is at http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.co...estrycoms.html

This is a deal-breaker for any serious genetic genealogist. When you know the start and end points and the chromosome number you can triangulate with other matches. That makes it easier to possibly find common ancestors or at least in which line the common ancestor may be found.
  #5  
Old 4th May 2012, 09:49 PM
T E Peterman T E Peterman is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,577
I'm sure that some genealogists will be lured by the cheap price into the Ancestry system & that will be disappointing, both for them because so much will no doubt be missing, & for us, because we will lose the opportunity to match them.

I hope that Family Tree DNA offers an upgrade path to Ancestry customers.

Timothy Peterman
  #6  
Old 4th May 2012, 10:53 PM
teyoung teyoung is offline
R-A287, J2a1a1b
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by T E Peterman View Post
I hope that Family Tree DNA offers an upgrade path to Ancestry customers.
In addition to not providing segment detail, there is no raw data download.

They say they are considering these options, but I have my doubts. It spoils the simplicity.
  #7  
Old 4th May 2012, 10:59 PM
teyoung teyoung is offline
R-A287, J2a1a1b
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by T E Peterman View Post
lured by the cheap price
I forgot to add that the $99 price appears temporary. They are building up the database.
  #8  
Old 28th June 2012, 05:15 PM
kytx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
my AncestryDNA test & results

Late last year I got an e-mail message from ancestry.com to do a test for $10. I thought the price was extremely right and so did it (my first DNA test). My first (cheek-swab) samples didn't work, so then they sent me a kit for saliva samples, which did work. I finally got these results:

45% British Isles
38% Scandinavian
06% Eastern European (changed from "Middle Eastern")
06% Central European
05% Uncertain

I'm very new to all of this and so don't really know what to do with those results beyond saying, "Okay." I sure don't know where the 3/8 Scandinavian come from. All of my gg-grandparents were born in the USA and almost all of the gggs (except one from Ireland about 1805 and one from Prussia about 1820) and most that I know beyond that. Both sides had rumors of an "Indian squaw" ancestor, but I was mostly skeptical of that from what I had found via traditional genealogy. My paternal grandmother's mother or someone like that was said to have gotten "the Indian hair". In the paper trails I actually did come up with an alleged descendant of an Indian squaw, a woman named Elizabeth Spurlock, a bunch of generations back.

So anyway, there they are. I'm awaiting my FTDNA Y-DNA 37 test, just submitted this past Monday. My most distant known ("for certain") paternal ancestor is John Cannon (1712-1763), born in England and died in South Carolina.

[not sure what to put in my signature]
  #9  
Old 16th July 2012, 07:22 AM
DeeTyler DeeTyler is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 173
OK I ordered my kit the first week of June, they received it back on 6/14, and I just received my results this morning. I have had my results tested on the three major sites now, and have very few close connections. But I thought I'd post the results for comparison:

-------------------------------

FTDNA was the first company that I tested with ... here, I have the following results:

Population Finder: 66.82% Europe (Western European/Orcadian); 33.18% Middle East (Palestinian, Druze, Jewish)

Unfortunately, here I only have 11 Matches, which is the main reason that I decided to expand my tests to other companies:

1 Brother
1 1st Cousin
1 2nd-4th cousin
1 4th-Remote cousin
7 5th-Remote cousin

COMMENTS: Even though the number of matches are very small, I *DID* make a significant connection with the person shown as a 2nd-4th cousin, who also matches my brother and first cousin. (Also another significant connection with a person who matches my brother but not me). While I haven't found the records to prove the ancestry of my branch of our common surname, I have been able to trace the ancestry of my match back in Polish records and have a fairly good idea of the families and towns to focus on for mine. The matches may be few here, but they appear to be sound.

---------------------------

23 and me ... Relative Finder
158 total matches
Only 4 are 3rd to 5th or 6th cousin; the remaining are 3rd (or greater) to distant cousins.

COMMENTS: No responses from the closest matches, which is unfortunate. Those matches who either have public profiles or who have responded to me appear to link to my Eastern European ancestors. Some more distant relatives have Colonial surnames and locations in common, but these connections are much more distant.

--------------------------

AncestryDNA - 149 matches total, ALL shown as 5th-8th cousins

47% Central European (46 matches)
17% Finnish/Volga-Ural (13 matches)
13% Persian/Turkish/Caucasus (5 matches)
9% Southern European (26 matches)
12% Eastern European (36 matches)
2% Uncertain

COMMENTS: Initial reaction is that the genetic breakdown appears to be off. I am 50% Sicilian on my maternal side and I can't figure out how this ancestry is reflected in those numbers. Compare to Eurogenes results in my signature. However, the number of matches that I have comes close to the number of matches at 23andme (which indicates that Ancestry's database is growing fast), and the addition of being able to see family trees will make it easier to see common connections. At first glance I am impressed, though I wish like most that there was a way to download the data and examine it more closely.

-----------------

OVERALL IMPRESSION: The main problem I have is the lack of response from matches. Where I have received responses from FTDNA, I have been able to see surname or geographical connections with the closer relatives. However, the more distant relatives are more difficult to ascertain. With a non-paternity event in our family tree, probably somewhere in the 18th or 19th century, many of these distant connections are a mystery. Being able to see the family trees more easily at AncestryDNA might help me piece that mystery together more easily - but because they don't share the genetic data it is hard to determine where the match occurs.
  #10  
Old 16th July 2012, 02:10 PM
MFWare MFWare is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern Louisiana
Posts: 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeeTyler View Post
...

AncestryDNA - 149 matches total, ALL shown as 5th-8th cousins

47% Central European (46 matches)
17% Finnish/Volga-Ural (13 matches)
13% Persian/Turkish/Caucasus (5 matches)
9% Southern European (26 matches)
12% Eastern European (36 matches)
2% Uncertain

COMMENTS: Initial reaction is that the genetic breakdown appears to be off. I am 50% Sicilian on my maternal side and I can't figure out how this ancestry is reflected in those numbers. Compare to Eurogenes results in my signature. However, the number of matches that I have comes close to the number of matches at 23andme (which indicates that Ancestry's database is growing fast), and the addition of being able to see family trees will make it easier to see common connections. At first glance I am impressed, though I wish like most that there was a way to download the data and examine it more closely.

-----------------

OVERALL IMPRESSION: The main problem I have is the lack of response from matches. Where I have received responses from FTDNA, I have been able to see surname or geographical connections with the closer relatives. However, the more distant relatives are more difficult to ascertain. With a non-paternity event in our family tree, probably somewhere in the 18th or 19th century, many of these distant connections are a mystery. Being able to see the family trees more easily at AncestryDNA might help me piece that mystery together more easily - but because they don't share the genetic data it is hard to determine where the match occurs.
You appear to be confirming my greatest fear about Ancestry's AncestryDNA-branded autosomal DNA test. That is, your results question its accuracy.

My first experience with genealogical DNA was with 23andMe. I have no reason to question its accuracy. For what you receive, it is the least expensive. However, I am frustrated by the refusal of some of closest matches to share their genomes. However, many 23andMe customers also test with FT-DNA and post both results on GEDmatch.com. Their 23andMe and FT-DNA results are as identical as can be expected. 23andMe identified my paternal haplogroup as R1b1b2a and my maternal haplogroup as L1c2b1. Using 23andMe's raw data, this result was confirmed using the James Lick mtDNA website.

I tested with African Ancestors. As 23andMe had already found to that my paternal haplogroup was European, it was pointless to test for my paternal haplogroup. AA identified my uninterrupted maternal roots to originate with the Tikar of Cameroon. AA does not maintain a growing list of current mtDNA matches. It also does not maintain an accessible DNA record of its customers online. That said, AA's results are consistent with 23andMe's results.

I tested with Ancestry. Ancestry identified my paternal haplogroup as R1b, a haplogroup determination with far less specificity than 23andMe's results. It identified my maternal haplogroup as X, a result that is diametrically opposite the results of 23andMe and African Ancestors. X is most densely represented among Native Americans in Eastern Canada and the US and Canadian Great Lakes. Other members of the DNA-Tested African Descendants group on Facebook report similar experiences with Ancestry's mtDNA test. Ancestry wrongly identifies subclades of the L haplogroup as X.

It is found in Northern Africa albeit infrequently. It is not found at all in Sub-Saharan West Africa. Ancestry identified a number of matches to my Y-DNA. However, the closet MRCA is separated from me by 9 generations. To my mtDNA, it found seven matches.

I have also taken the AncestryDNA autosomal DNA test. I await the results. Until I receive the results, I urge everyone who is considering it to hold off. I am willing to act as the guinea pig.

I am also currrently awaiting the results of my FT-DNA Comprehensive Genome with the Y-DNA upgrade from 67 to 111 markers. My tests are in Batch 472. The first results will be ready on August 24 and the rest by September 7.

Early posters to this thread took for granted that Ancestry conducts accurate DNA tests. I became interested in its tests because I am a subscriber to its website and the prospect of attaching DNA results to my family tree was attractive. After I made the decision to test with them, however, I learned of the problems with the company's accuracy.

Whether the accuracy problems lie with Ancestry's sampling, sequencing, or analysis, I do not know. Whatever the cause, Ancestry needs to get its act together.
Closed Thread

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:51 PM.


Family Tree DNA - World Headquarters

1445 North Loop West, Suite 820
Houston, Texas 77008, USA

Phone: (713) 868-1438 | Fax: (832) 201-7147
Copyright 2001-2010 Genealogy by Genetics, Ltd.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.