Go Back   Family Tree DNA Forums > General Interest > Scientific Papers

Scientific Papers For talk of scientific papers on population genetics, archaeology, and anthropology related to DNA and personal ancestry testing.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 9th February 2018, 06:45 PM
josh w. josh w. is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,536
Quote:
Originally Posted by loobster View Post
Both links gave me "This site can't be reached", its server IP address could not be found.
Same here. If correct, the results would be consistent with Richards view.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 9th February 2018, 08:42 PM
khazaria khazaria is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 474
Some news has come in very recently that the mtDNA haplogroups J1c7a and H11a2a2 that are occasionally found among Ashkenazic Jews, but not in significant frequencies, have Balto-Slavic origins.

Samuel Andrews researched the distribution of H11a2a2. It peaks in frequency in Poland.

As for J1c7a, it's the haplogroup of a person buried in the Kowalewko cemetery in Poland during the Iron Age, according to the data in this study:
"A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age"
by Ireneusz Stolarek, et al.
in Scientific Reports 8 (February 6, 2018): article number 2455
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20705-6
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10th February 2018, 11:46 AM
josh w. josh w. is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,536
Quote:
Originally Posted by khazaria View Post
Some news has come in very recently that the mtDNA haplogroups J1c7a and H11a2a2 that are occasionally found among Ashkenazic Jews, but not in significant frequencies, have Balto-Slavic origins.

Samuel Andrews researched the distribution of H11a2a2. It peaks in frequency in Poland.

As for J1c7a, it's the haplogroup of a person buried in the Kowalewko cemetery in Poland during the Iron Age, according to the data in this study:
"A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age"
by Ireneusz Stolarek, et al.
in Scientific Reports 8 (February 6, 2018): article number 2455
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20705-6
Thanks. I am J1c14 which is downstream of J1c7. It is found in both Scandinavia and the southern Baltics. I had wondered about how it reached the Baltics. It looks like it was from central Europe related to Neolithic migration.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 AM.


Family Tree DNA - World Headquarters

1445 North Loop West, Suite 820
Houston, Texas 77008, USA

Phone: (713) 868-1438 | Fax: (832) 201-7147
Copyright 2001-2010 Genealogy by Genetics, Ltd.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.