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  #11  
Old 26th April 2013, 05:08 PM
Steven Akins Steven Akins is offline
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Originally Posted by bob armstrong View Post
Sadly, most of the Victorian's theories were erroneous, Steve. The Siward & Fairbairn conjectures fell into that trap. Unfortunately, once info is put on the internet it is taken as gospel. Luckily the Medieval cartularies, pipe rolls etc have enough clues in them to allow a more sensible assesment to be made.
Bob
Yes, I strongly suspect that Black's conjecture that my surname and it's variant spellings are variants of Aitken (visa vi: Adkin, Atkin) is incorrect, as my own family line and those of other Akinses, Aikens, etc. never spelled their surname with a -t- or a -d- in it, unless it was dropped so long ago that they have no evidence of it ever having been included in the spelling of the surname. What we do find is that very often the name was spelled as Eakin, and I suspect that may be an Anglicization of the Gaelic name Eachin. Eakins and Akins are both pronounced the same ("A-kinz") with a hard-A.

Of course if George F. Black put it in his book, everyone thinks it is gospel, even though the man was not infallible and is bound to have made mistakes occassionally.
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  #12  
Old 26th April 2013, 09:27 PM
bob armstrong bob armstrong is offline
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The 'kin' ending on some names can be a sign of Flemish origins, Steve. One classic example is Freskin, a Fleming, noted in many Scottish Medieval docs as 'Freskin the Fleming'.
Jenkins is another name that is a member of the R-P312** group. To most of us in Britain, it would seem to indicate a Welsh/Brythonic Celt origin, but the 'kin' ending was brought to Wales by Flemish settlers. Most Jenkins may well be of Welsh stock, but had their original Welsh-spelt surname corrupted into the form we now are familiar with. From memory, I think the Welsh had a similar name called 'Siencyn', similar to Jenkin.
Bob

Last edited by bob armstrong; 26th April 2013 at 09:36 PM.
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  #13  
Old 26th April 2013, 09:55 PM
Steven Akins Steven Akins is offline
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Originally Posted by bob armstrong View Post
The 'kin' ending on some names can be a sign of Flemish origins, Steve. One classic example is Freskin, a Fleming, noted in many Scottish Medieval docs as 'Freskin the Fleming'.
Jenkins is another name that is a member of the R-P312** group. To most of us in Britain, it would seem to indicate a Welsh/Brythonic Celt origin, but the 'kin' ending was brought to Wales by Flemish settlers. Most Jenkins may well be of Welsh stock, but had their original Welsh-spelt surname corrupted into the form we now are familiar with. From memory, I think the Welsh had a similar name called 'Siencyn', similar to Jenkin.
Bob
My recent DNA results confirming my haplotype are R-U106 have me wondering if my Akins ancestors might have been of Flemish origin, and if the surname might actually be derived from the name of the town of Aachen, which lies just inside Germany near the Flemish border. R-U106 appears to be most heavily concentrated in the Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands).

An early Scottish record which contains the first known appearance of my surname in Scotland is found in A Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London, which entry bears the date November 20, 1405, and reads:

Quote:
"Warrant to the Chancellor, - On the petition of John Hadyngton and John of Akyne, Scottish merchants, showing how they during the late truce were on their voyage to Scotland when a barge and a balyngere of war with Laurence Tuttebury of Hulle and his people made them prisoners on 5th September last, with goods worth 500 marks, and kept them in Hull for eight weeks"
Black mentions this entry in his Surnames of Scotland, but dismisses the "of" indication of the name being geographical in origin as a clerical error, since he knew of no place in Scotland by that name; although there is a strait called Kyle Akin that separates the Isle of Skye from the mainland and is the location of Dun Akin castle, both of which are said to have been named after King Hakon of Norway who invaded in 1263 AD.

Last edited by Steven Akins; 26th April 2013 at 10:04 PM.
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  #14  
Old 26th April 2013, 10:25 PM
bob armstrong bob armstrong is offline
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It's unfortunate that many overlook Flemings as being potential progenitors for their surname, Steve. Many who claim Norman ancestry are unaware that Normandy was home to many Flemings following numerous floods in Flanders. Also, William the Conqueror & some of his family wed Flemish girls which also encouraged Flemings into Normandy.
Places like the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy were difficult for the Normans/French to cultivate, but the Flemings were skilled at 'scrabble farming', & were often encouraged to farm the region.
Many of the Scottish nobles had Flemish roots: Douglas & Bruce being prime examples.
You rightly pointed out place names in Belgium. It is important as I've found several Norman towns & villages had similarly-written equivalents in Flanders.
Bob
PS Another Scottish 'kin' name is Erskine
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  #15  
Old 26th April 2013, 10:51 PM
bob armstrong bob armstrong is offline
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I should also mention that Flemings were utilised in the Scottish wool trade. Thousands of sheep were exported from the Border counties via Berwick to Bruges.
Bob
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  #16  
Old 27th April 2013, 06:38 AM
Steven Akins Steven Akins is offline
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Originally Posted by bob armstrong View Post
I should also mention that Flemings were utilised in the Scottish wool trade. Thousands of sheep were exported from the Border counties via Berwick to Bruges.
Bob
Some very good articles on the subject of Flemish Scots at:

http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/Co...spx?r=546&2175

and

http://moultray.wordpress.com/2010/0...e-in-scotland/
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  #17  
Old 27th April 2013, 06:57 AM
bob armstrong bob armstrong is offline
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I'm familiar with those sites, Steve. They are excellent. Many of the chamberlains of Scotland were Flemings, and they were powerful men. The Flemish tradition of nobilitas saw them tending to marry their own, if possible. From my reading of Medieval works, I suspect nepotism was a strong trait for the Flanders-linked folk!
Cheers,
Bob
PS Achene, Namur, Flanders does seem a possible home for your ancestors

Last edited by bob armstrong; 27th April 2013 at 07:02 AM.
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  #18  
Old 27th April 2013, 08:45 AM
Steven Akins Steven Akins is offline
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Originally Posted by bob armstrong View Post
I'm familiar with those sites, Steve. They are excellent. Many of the chamberlains of Scotland were Flemings, and they were powerful men. The Flemish tradition of nobilitas saw them tending to marry their own, if possible. From my reading of Medieval works, I suspect nepotism was a strong trait for the Flanders-linked folk!
Cheers,
Bob
PS Achene, Namur, Flanders does seem a possible home for your ancestors
Achene, Belgium? That is a place I've never heard of before. It's certainly one of a growing number of potential etymological origins for my surname that needs to be sorted through.

One thing is for sure, having Scottish ancestry isn't a cut and dried proposition - there is an enormous wealth of diversity that goes into the making of the Scottish ethnos beyond just the Gaels, Picts, Britons, Angles and Vikings, much of which was probably not contemplated and had probably been forgotten by the time my Presbyterian Scots-Irish ancestors had firmly established themselves on American soil by the mid 1700's.
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  #19  
Old 28th December 2017, 06:19 AM
GeraldineA GeraldineA is offline
 
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Flemings

Hey,Steven kins those articles are really great. Thank you.
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